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Anthologies: The Children's Hour vs Young Folks' Library vs ?

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While I'm at library booksales, I sometimes see volumes from these anthologies (sample pictures below):

 

The Children's Hour:

http://thesmallhousehalfwayupinthenextblock.com/ebay/2008-06-11/books.html

 

Young Folks Library:

http://www.amazon.com/Young-Folks-Library-Volumes-Set/dp/B005IAV9W0

 

They seem similar - selections of poetry, fiction, non-fiction. The vintage ones are lovely, with the color illustrations and hard covers. I have a soft spot for vintage texts, but shelf space and money constrain me from buying every text that comes my way. :tongue_smilie:

 

Does anyone have one or the other (or both), and want to comment on them?

Or, would you recommend another collection? For example, I've seen Collier's "The Junior Classics" too, but not as often.

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I have most of the Through Golden Windows and a few volumes of the Bookshelf for Boys and Girls.

 

There are repetitions, but some may have reprints of something you may want elsewhere. For example I realized there were a good number of myths and Famous Stories Retold in the Bookshelf ones.

 

Don't be afraid to select only one volume. You don't have to get a set.

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I have most of the Through Golden Windows and a few volumes of the Bookshelf for Boys and Girls.

..

Don't be afraid to select only one volume. You don't have to get a set.

 

Thanks, stripe! I hadn't seen the 'Through Golden Windows' set before, and I had forgotten about the Bookshelf set.

 

About buying only one volume, my initial reaction was that you are more self-disciplined than I. :D

 

But I also wonder: do your future plans for the books affect your buying strategy? For me, I think it would be nice to pass along a set to my dc, but recently I've been wondering if/how much they would be appreciated, given that eReaders are taking over.

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But I also wonder: do your future plans for the books affect your buying strategy? For me, I think it would be nice to pass along a set to my dc, but recently I've been wondering if/how much they would be appreciated, given that eReaders are taking over.

Sorry I didn't respond before now!

 

Well, I came across the Bookshelf books at a library book sale. I grabbed the ones that were there. I just bought them because books were priced by the bag, so I figured, why not? I did nothing with them, and then I figured out they had some useful things in them. I considered buying others online but didn't think it was worth it.

 

With Through Golden Windows, I think I read about them online and tracked down a set with most volumes online, not very expensively. I recently found another volume at a library book sale. Again, they're not bad, but I wouldn't set out to buy them. I don't think my kids are so crazy about them that they care if they inherit them. ;)

 

The other set I have is Childcraft. I was at a library book sale that had a complete set, and I, for some reason, only bought two. Then later I kicked myself and bought a set inexpensively online (slightly different year). I think I found one volume --Mathemagic, which is probably my and one kid's favorite -- at a booksale. I have added in a few annual editions from online purchases. One kid likes the volumes about how things are made, Mathemagic, and we read some of the fairy tale volumes. They are somewhat useful to have around at home, but not really amazing.

 

I wonder, are the other anthologies, such as My Book House, dramatically different or better?

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Now I want that Golden Windows set, which I was unaware of previously -- thanks, Stripe!! :tongue_smilie:

 

Gaaa! You people kill me with these threads on these wonderful vintage collections! Seriously, this is my one area of weakness that could verge into addiction if I keep reading about these wonderful collections!! :tongue_smilie:

 

 

Okay, a little more seriously... I have the entire 10-volume Collier's Young Folks' Shelf of Books (c. 1962), and love it. The reader level is best for grades 6-9. These have fabulous selections for Classical homeschoolers -- fairy tales around the world (vol. 1-2); myths and hero legends (vol. 3 and 4); history (v. 8) classic poems (vol. 10).

 

I also have most of the old Ginn Basic Readers for gr. 3-6. These are great for those ages -- while some of the selections are hokey/dated 1950s "Dick & Jane" type stories, but there are also a lot of folktales, myths, excerpts, and adaptations of classics, all at that grade's reading level. The Golden Windows set that Stripe mentioned looks like it overlaps in types of selections with the Ginn Basic Readers.

 

I also have one volume of The Children's Hour (#11); I think I was given it by someone else, and we never quite got around to using it, but the one we have seems to be most excerpts from Newberry and other young adult works; best for grades 4-6, I'd guess. In a past thread, someone else recommend the My Book House series, which looks like it would be for grades 4-8.

 

 

Happy (vintage) reading! Warmest regards, Lori D.

Edited by Lori D.

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I'm guilty too....

 

I found a subset of the 6 Collier books on ebay this morning for $8 with free shipping and took the plunge.

 

I'll try to post how they compare!

 

I am not sure the Through Golden Windows books are that great. I bought a set for somewhere around $15 or $20, and found one at a booksale recently ($1), no clue why they are so expensive online. They are somewhat cute, though. There are some illustrations by Ezra Jack Keats and Lois Lenski. But I like Keats' collages more!

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I have been picking up a volume here and there from some of these sets. I have just recently become very comfortable with owning single volumes. I realized I don't like some of the titles and have no reason to store them for the sake of having a complete set.

 

Yesterday I bought a Young Folks Treasury, called The Animal World by Theodore Wood. It is a 1917 copy but I'm museum quality shape. I LOVE it. I see that Google has a copy.

 

I'm on the look out lately, for science and math read alouds, and sometimes these sets include them.

 

I'm in a serious "less is more" mind frame the past couple weeks. Okay, all of this stuff is GOOD, but I"m so buried in the good that the GREAT is getting neglected. I'm having to toss more and more good things aside.

 

It was just in these past couple weeks I've totally embraced only choosing selectively from these sets, even if I'm offered the whole set for free.

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I grew up with Through Golden Windows. My siblings and I loved them to pieces, literally! We read them over and over. I got a set for myself long before I had my son, and have given sets as gifts. Lots of info in them on science, history, tons of poetry, and excerpts of good books, along with fairy tales, folk tales, and the like. The pictures aren't that great, but I find the info in them good.

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:seeya:

Hi guys!

I'm super sick right now, but my husband stepped out so he can't nag me to get into bed! :D

This is my all time favorite subject... I'm happy to say I don't have either set, which means there's still plenty out there to find. :tongue_smilie:

I'll post what I have in a minute. :auto:

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In my opinion My Book House is the best, but only because I grew up with that set. I spent many hours of my childhood looking at and reading those books. I had and have now the blue set from the 30s. I have a newer version started too... I think I need to let those go to make room.

 

I have two versions of Collier's Junior Classics, one from 1912 the other 1953.The 1912 set has fewer but better quality artwork.

 

Another one that I've started is Book Trails from 1928. I haven't looked through them too much, but they're sturdy and are chock-full of beautiful art work. http://www.etsy.com/listing/9323406/vintage-book-trails-book-1928-storybook

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I have most of the Through Golden Windows and a few volumes of the Bookshelf for Boys and Girls.

 

There are repetitions, but some may have reprints of something you may want elsewhere. For example I realized there were a good number of myths and Famous Stories Retold in the Bookshelf ones.

 

Don't be afraid to select only one volume. You don't have to get a set.

 

I had never heard of these until last week. They were on the $.25 shelf at the library book store! I bought what they had, maybe 5 or 6 books. I'm so glad to read a good review of the set.

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But I also wonder: do your future plans for the books affect your buying strategy? For me, I think it would be nice to pass along a set to my dc, but recently I've been wondering if/how much they would be appreciated, given that eReaders are taking over.

 

eReaders. Boo! :tongue_smilie:

 

The emergence of eReaders has actually accelerated my purchases of all books, especially vintage selections. I will be passing on these books to my kids so they can share the magic with their kids.

 

In my opinion My Book House is the best, but only because I grew up with that set. I spent many hours of my childhood looking at and reading those books. I had and have now the blue set from the 30s. I have a newer version started too... I think I need to let those go to make room.

 

Oh, thank heavens! :lol: I already own this version of My Book House. It was a gift for my DD one year and it is spectacular! (It looks so pretty on her shelf too. :D) Whenever we take a trip and I tell the kids they can choose only a book or two to pack, they invariably pick a volume or two of this set. I just ordered the Through Golden Windows set for my DS5's upcoming birthday. You people are trouble. :tongue_smilie:

 

I was petrified of your recommendations. My debit card probably headed for the hills when I read your pp that you'd post with ideas. :lol:

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Now I want that Golden Windows set, which I was unaware of previously -- thanks, Stripe!! :tongue_smilie:

 

Gaaa! You people kill me with these threads on these wonderful vintage collections! Seriously, this is my one area of weakness that could verge into addiction if I keep reading about these wonderful collections!! :tongue_smilie:

 

 

Okay, a little more seriously... I have the entire 10-volume Collier's Young Folks' Shelf of Books (c. 1962), and love it. The reader level is best for grades 6-9. These have fabulous selections for Classical homeschoolers -- fairy tales around the world (vol. 1-2); myths and hero legends (vol. 3 and 4); history (v. 8) classic poems (vol. 10).

 

I also have most of the old Ginn Basic Readers for gr. 3-6. These are great for those ages -- while some of the selections are hokey/dated 1950s "Dick & Jane" type stories, but there are also a lot of folktales, myths, excerpts, and adaptations of classics, all at that grade's reading level. The Golden Windows set that Stripe mentioned looks like it overlaps in types of selections with the Ginn Basic Readers.

 

I also have one volume of The Children's Hour (#11); I think I was given it by someone else, and we never quite got around to using it, but the one we have seems to be most excerpts from Newberry and other young adult works; best for grades 4-6, I'd guess. In a past thread, someone else recommend the My Book House series, which looks like it would be for grades 4-8.

 

 

Happy (vintage) reading! Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

My daughters learned to read with those books (and Dick and Jane)! I've held on to my vintage early reader books. It's okay if the girls don't want to use them with their own kids, I get all warm and fuzzy looking at them. Happy memories. :001_wub:

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My Book House series, which looks like it would be for grades 4-8.

 

These are more like pre-K through 12. They build up nicely. They range from nursery rhymes and fairy tales to Shakespeare and other such challenging content. The later volumes are too much for me when I'm tired. :tongue_smilie:

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I have been picking up a volume here and there from some of these sets. I have just recently become very comfortable with owning single volumes. I realized I don't like some of the titles and have no reason to store them for the sake of having a complete set.

 

Yesterday I bought a Young Folks Treasury, called The Animal World by Theodore Wood. It is a 1917 copy but I'm museum quality shape. I LOVE it. I see that Google has a copy.

 

I'm on the look out lately, for science and math read alouds, and sometimes these sets include them.

 

I'm in a serious "less is more" mind frame the past couple weeks. Okay, all of this stuff is GOOD, but I"m so buried in the good that the GREAT is getting neglected. I'm having to toss more and more good things aside.

 

It was just in these past couple weeks I've totally embraced only choosing selectively from these sets, even if I'm offered the whole set for free.

 

ARE YOU INSANE WOMAN??!! :tongue_smilie:

 

I recently scored on this 1911 set Book of Knowledge. It has some science. This link tells which subjects are covered. They are amazing!!

http://www.hstreasures.com/bookofknowledge.html

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eReaders. Boo! :tongue_smilie:

 

The emergence of eReaders has actually accelerated my purchases of all books, especially vintage selections. I will be passing on these books to my kids so they can share the magic with their kids.

 

 

 

Oh, thank heavens! :lol: I already own this version of My Book House. It was a gift for my DD one year and it is spectacular! (It looks so pretty on her shelf too. :D) Whenever we take a trip and I tell the kids they can choose only a book or two to pack, they invariably pick a volume or two of this set. I just ordered the Through Golden Windows set for my DS5's upcoming birthday. You people are trouble. :tongue_smilie:

 

I was petrified of your recommendations. My debit card probably headed for the hills when I read your pp that you'd post with ideas. :lol:

 

 

 

I know what you mean, I want a set of My Book House! So much money tho....money I don't have!

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I know what you mean, I want a set of My Book House! So much money tho....money I don't have!

 

I've found almost every vintage set I own at the library book stores in my town. Do you have something like that? For sets I usually pay $1-$2 each.

 

My Book House is worth the hunt! :001_smile:

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ARE YOU INSANE WOMAN??!! :tongue_smilie:

 

I recently scored on this 1911 set Book of Knowledge. It has some science. This link tells which subjects are covered. They are amazing!!

http://www.hstreasures.com/bookofknowledge.html

 

Encyclopedias are a whole other topic!

 

I'm happy and grateful for this 1917 set of ebooks, but would much prefer it in print. http://freehomeschoolinglibrar.blogspot.com/2007/12/world-book-encyclopedia-and.html

 

Many of the articles have lesson plans after them and are still relevant like "Bees".

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Much of The Children's Hour is available online -- for those who choose not to buy the original, or might want to tuck a spare copy in their purses. :)

 

There's also A Guide to Good Reading by Linscott, which has a list of all the titles along with some essays written for the parents. Very interesting in itself.

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Encyclopedias are a whole other topic!

 

I'm happy and grateful for this 1917 set of ebooks, but would much prefer it in print. http://freehomeschoolinglibrar.blogspot.com/2007/12/world-book-encyclopedia-and.html

 

Many of the articles have lesson plans after them and are still relevant like "Bees".

 

Yeah, I keep telling myself NO MORE ENCYCLOPEDIAS!!! But I don't listen. :D

My latest score is The Annals of America. http://www.amazon.com/Annals-America-22-Set/dp/0852299605

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Much of The Children's Hour is available online -- for those who choose not to buy the original, or might want to tuck a spare copy in their purses. :)

 

There's also A Guide to Good Reading by Linscott, which has a list of all the titles along with some essays written for the parents. Very interesting in itself.

 

Thanks!

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Stripe - thanks for replying to my question! This forum moves so fast that threads get buried, so I was pleasantly surprised to see this thread revive. :001_smile: I also enjoy reading about PPs' finds (though I have to strongly refrain from opening another tab and searching eBay). :tongue_smilie:

 

I'll share what I have, with a couple of notes. I haven't read all the books yet (Hunter, I do know what you mean about so much being good that it drowns out the great).

 

Young Folks' Library, 1902 (missing #13 - Sea Stories)

Vol 1 - The Story Teller

Vol 2 - The Merry Maker

Vol 3 - A Book of Famous Fairy Tales

Vol 4 - Tales of Fantasy

Vol 5 - A Book of Famous Myths and Legends

Vol 6 - The Animal Story Book

Vol 7 - Stories of School and College Days

Vol 8 - The Book of Adventure

Vol 9 - A Book of Famous Explorers

Vol 10 - A Book of Brave Deeds

Vol 11 - Wonders of Earth, Sea and Sky

Vol 12 - A Book of Famous Travel

Vol 14 - A Book of Natural History

Vol 15 - Historic Scenes in Fiction

Vol 16 - Famous Battles By Land and Sea

Vol 17 - Men Who Have Risen

Vol 18 - Book of Patriotism

Vol 19 - Leaders of Men, or History Told In Biographies

Vol 20 - A Book of Famous Poems

 

Young Folks' Library, 1919 (missing #3)

Vol 1 - Childhood favorites and Fairy Stories

Vol 2 - Classic Tales and Everyday Stories

Vol 4 - Modern Tales and Animal Stories

Vol 5 - The Animal World

Vol 6 - Travels and Adventure

Vol 7 -Heroes and Patriots

Vol 8 - Science, Invention and Plant Life

Vol 9 - Men and Women of Achievement

Vol 10 - Ideal Home Life

Vol 11 - Golden Hours with the Poets

Vol 12 - Music and Art

 

My Book House, 1971 (my summary of each title in parentheses)

Vol 1 - In the Nursery (nursery rhymes and poems, international)

Vol 2 - Story Time (simple stories with a repetitive refrain)

Vol 3 - Up One Pair of Stairs (Fairy tales from other countries)

Vol 4 - Through the Gate (Longer fairy stories)

Vol 5 - Over the Hills (Travel and exploration themed stories)

Vol 6 - Through Fairy Halls (More dramatic stories, e.g. Midsummer Night's Dream)

Vol 7- The Magic Garden (Fairy stories across different cultures by theme)

Vol 8 - Flying Sails (Stories of real adventure)

Vol 9 - The Treasure Chest (More adventures + some stronger adventure legends)

Vol 10 - From the Tower Window (Introduction to national epics from different nations, e.g. Ramayana)

Vol 11 - In Shining Armor (More romantic and epic tales, some American histories)

Vol 12 - Halls of Fame (Inspirational histories of achievement)

 

Some notes:

1) Young Folks' Library 1902 is more verbose, and perhaps challenging than 1919. Contrast the first few sentences from Griselda (Cantebury Tales)

 

1902:

"Walter, Marquis of Saluzzo, in Lombardy, was young, handsome and well made; he was kind to everybody, granted all the requests of his subjects, and was always upon the watch to relieve their distress. No prince was more beloved than he was. Yet he had one fault: somebody had put into his head, when he was a boy, that he should take care to preserve his freedom, and that if he was not upon his guard he would lose it before he was aware, and not be able to rise and go to bed, or to ride or to walk, to eat or to fast, to be in company, or alone, just when and how he liked."

 

1919:

"Once upon a time there lived a fair young girl whose name was Griselda. Her home was in an Italian village. There, she dwelt in a lowly cottage with her father, Janicola. He was too old and weak to work for her, or even for himself."

 

2) On the other hand, Young Folks 1919 covers science using literature (living book), a focus entirely absent in 1902. For example:

 

1919, vol 8, "The Telegraph" by Charles Gibson

"There is nothing mysterious about an electric battery. You could make a battery for yourself. When I was a schoolboy I was very fortunate in being shown, by the late Lord Kelvin's brother, how to make a battery. This is how he did it."

 

3) My Book House (1971) is more visually appealing, the color illustrations, although limited in tones, are rich in detail and harmonious. As others have mentioned, My Book House is graded by level of difficulty as well as intended audience maturity, e.g. it avoids stories that would emotionally scar the intense imagination of young children (Babes in the Wood, anyone? This is a chief gripe of mine regarding fairy stories).

 

ETA - It seems (I'm hoping someone who actually owns the set can confirm :) ) that The Children's Hour is arranged by audience age as well, from this content listing.

http://thesmallhousehalfwayupinthenextblock.com/ebay/2008-06-11/books.html

Edited by leeyeewah
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I've found almost every vintage set I own at the library book stores in my town. Do you have something like that? For sets I usually pay $1-$2 each.

 

I want to go shopping at your libraries!:001_smile: Sets start out at $10-20 at my favorite monthly library sale, and I patiently wait until they get moved to the bargain section (2 months later), where I usually buy them for 25 cents/volume (or make an offer).

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I love vintage texts, too. I always have my eyes open at used bookshops and library book sales for them!

 

I recently ran across the hstreasures website and found out about The Book of Knowledge. A few days later my hubby called me from the DAV thrift store and asked me if I had ever heard of them and if he should pick them up for me! So, now I have a 1952 set of The Book of Knowledge - Magic Carpet Edition.

 

I also have My Bookhouse (1970) set + 2 of the vintage ones. I also have a set of "The Children's Hour". I have never spent a lot on a set either, buying them at thrift stores or library book sales. I recently picked up three of the Harriet & Treadwell Readers at a used bookstore that were in pristine condition.

 

I also own my great-grandfather's primary and higher arithmetic books from 1912. It is cool to see his name written on the flyleaf! I also have my grandmother's literature book from high school. She and my grandfather were high school sweethearts and she wrote their names together on the front cover. I love that book!

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I'm so happy this thread has taken off! :)

 

Through Golden Windows (1958) - each topic is spread over two volumes. The first is generally easier reading; the second is more advanced.

Mostly Magic

Fun and Fantasy - folk/fairy tales

Wonderful Things Happen

Adventures Here and There - real life / fictional but believable adventures of children

Good Times Together (*)

Children Everywhere - adventures of children around the world

Stories of Early America

American Backgrounds - American history, contains stories and poems of famous or notable Americans

Wide, Wonderful World

Man and His World - science and natural history (including animals and seasons)

 

(*) I don't own this one, but I am writing its name to complete the list

 

Personally, I've become fond of having these volumes to read through at bedtime because they have such a variety of things. My son has read quite a few of two 1970s era Childcraft volumes of folk tales (Children Everywhere and Stories and Fables) before bed on his own. I think because he's read a few of the nonfiction Childcraft volumes he may feel more familiar with them.

 

The Bookshelf for Boys and Girls (1966)

Vol 2 - Happy Hours in Storyland

Vol 3 - Folk and Fairy Tales - "The normal healthy-minded child is not harmed by fairy tales, but it is unwise indeed to expose a child to them before he is emotionally ready to accept them as fantasy. The child whose life is generally satisfying and secure, and who is mature enough, will take the most gruesome fairy tales in his stride, as he does the blood-and-thunder shows he sees on television.

"To avoid exposing children to fairy tales too early, we have reserved them for this, the third volume of our set. We feel that a child will get more enjoyment from fairy tales if he reads them after he has been through the simpler rhymes and stories in Volumes I and II."

Vol 4 - Stories and Songs from Many Lands - I do love that there are songs and games in here (about 80 pages worth).

This volume contains profiles by James Baldwin as well as Greek and Roman myths and legends (from Baldwin and Nathaniel Hawthorne), Norse tales, "African and Asiatic" tales (inc Arabian Nights), Old Favorites from the Old Country (! which includes quite a variety of countries), Latin American legends, Stories of North America (mostly concerning children and/or animals such as Balto)

The illustrations are mostly colored in black and white, and sometimes mediocre, but there are some by Wanda Gag, and a few color plates per book

Vol 9 - Great Events and Famous People - Early explorers and pathfinders, "Sweet land of liberty," Lives of Kindness and Courage (St Francis of Assisi, Louis Braille, Florence Nightengale, Harriet Tubman, Clara Barton, Pulitzer, Jacob Riis, Sir Wilfred Greenfell, Fr Edward Flanagan, Helen Keller, Four chaplains of WWII, and Albert Schweitzer), Great Names from Foreign Lands (Joan of Arc, Bolivar, Garibaldi, Sun Yat Sen, Gandhi, and Churchill), Dreamers and Doers in Science and Invention, Writers fo Stories Children Love (Dickens, Andersen, Twain, and RLStevenson) - notable I think for its diversity including listing scientists, writers, and good citizens, rather than only political figures.

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Ok...my hubby is not going to be happy about me reading this thread. The spring library book sale is coming up soon, so now I have a new list of things to look for!

 

I need to write down which of the 1930's versions of My Book House that I have and try to complete that vintage set. The 1970's is pretty, but not in the same way!

 

If you ever have a chance to buy a set of the Book of Knowledge - they are ah-mazing!! My oldest daughter latched onto them when we first brought them home and I've seen her carry various volumes around since then. It is really neat because each volume has a variety of subjects to learn about. They are all written in a narrative form and very interesting.

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ETA - It seems (I'm hoping someone who actually owns the set can confirm :) ) that The Children's Hour is arranged by audience age as well, from this content listing.

http://thesmallhousehalfwayupinthenextblock.com/ebay/2008-06-11/books.html

I haven't looked into them much, but according to the guide (linked above), the contents of the whole series were chosen to be acceptable for all ages in terms of content. They recommend trying the later books even with young children, because they often respond well to passages that we might consider too advanced. This includes a lot of poetry with rich language, and excerpts from books such as Robinson Crusoe and Pilgrim's Progress.

 

Excerpts are often criticized, but I can see how they would give the little ones a taste of great writing without the disturbing bits. The Children's Hour just sets out to give a peek into these longer books -- not a substitute for reading the whole thing later on.

 

ETA: These must have been a very big investment in their day. It is astonishing to me that they're now available for free, and can be stored on a compact portable device. Even those who can't afford to buy the originals, or don't have the space -- or, like me, react badly to mold and mildew, and have given up on buying sets of old books without handling them in person first -- can give their children a wonderful experience of literature. Not so much by handing them a little doo-dad with a screen, but more by choosing selections and reading them aloud at a special time each day -- which was the original purpose of this set (hence the title).

 

ETA 2: Hmm... The guide I'm talking about is from 1912, and goes with the books of the same era. The set linked above is from 1953, and seems to include modern stories. I'm not sure if this is an updated edition, or something entirely different. Either way, what I've written here might not apply.

Edited by Eleanor

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Of course, you know this means war. :tongue_smilie: If you are going to post the list of volumes and what's in each, I will too. :tongue_smilie: Enjoy! Warmest regards to my fellow vintage book fiends, Lori D.


Ginn Basic Readers
see them (here or here)

Primer
- My Little Red Story Book (1st primer)
- My Little Green Story Book (2nd primer)
- My Little Blue Story Book (3rd primer)
- Come With Us (enrichment)

1st Grade
- The Little White House (1st semester reader)
- On Cherry Street (2nd semester reader)
- Under the Apple Tree (enrichment)
- Open the Gate (enrichment)

2nd Grade:
- We Are Neighbors (1st semester reader)
- Around the Corner (2nd semester reader)
- Ranches and Rainbows (enrichment)

3rd Grade
- Finding New Neighbors (1st semester reader)
- Friends Far and Near (2nd semester 1reader)
- Fun and Fancy (enrichment)

4th Grade
- Roads to Everywhere (reader)
- Down Story Roads (enrichment)

5th Grade
- Trails to Treasure (reader)
- Doorways to Discovery (reader)
- Along Story Trails (enrichment)

6th Grade
- Wings to Adventure (reader)
- Windows on the World (reader)
- On Story Wings (enrichment)


Canadian Ginn Basic Reader titles
- Adventure Awaits (4th; reader)
- Beyond the Horizon (5th; enrichment)
- New Worlds (6th; reader)
- On Story Wings (6th; enrichment)
- Reach for the Stars (?)


Collier's Young Folks Shelf of Books -- pre-1960 volume titles:
Volume 1: Fairy Tales and Fables
Volume 2: Stories of Wonder and Magic
Volume 3: Myths and Legends
Volume 4: Hero Tales
Volume 5: Stories That Never Grow Old
Volume 6: Stories About Boys and Girls
Volume 7: The Animal Book
Volume 8: Stories From History
Volume 9: Sport and Adventure
Volume 10: Poetry Reading Guide Indexes


Collier's Young Folks Shelf of Books -- post 1960 volume titles:
- A B C Go!
- Once Upon A Time
- Magic In The Air
- Just Around The Corner
- In Your Own Backyard
- Harvest Of Holidays
- Legends Of Long Ago
- Roads To Greatness
- Call Of Adventure
- Gifts From The Past


Collier's Young Folks Shelf of Books contents (from pre-1960 edition)

1 = Fairy Tales and Fables
(66 fairy tales from England, Ireland, Germany, Norway, France, Czechoslovakia, Russia, and India by 11 different authors, including some by the Grimm brothers; also 14 Aesop fables)

2 = Stories of Wonder and Magic
(26 folk tales and magic stories by famous authors such as Edward Lear, A.A. Milne, Carl Sandburg, George MacDonald, Walter de la Mare, Padraic Colum, Howard Pyle and Frank Stockton; also includes reprints of Aladdin and Ali Baba from "The Arabian Nights"; plus 8 stories by Hans Christian Andersen)

3 = Myths and Legends
(10 Greek/Roman myths, some by Thomas Bulfinch or Nathaniel Hawthorne; 9 Norse myths; 6 myths from India; 7 Native American myths; 19 "old legends" which include St. George and Dragon, William Tell, The Flying Dutchman, and a number of legends about beasts and saints)

4 = Hero Tales
(ALL selections are prose retelling excerpts (some by James Baldwin or Paidric Colum) from:
"The Odyssey"
"Rustem and Sohrab (from the ancient Persian epic "Shah-Nameh")
"The Forging of the Sampo" (from the Finnish epic "The Kalevala")
"The Song of Roland"
"The Chronicle of the Cid"
"Beowulf"
King Arthur and the Round Table
"The Hunting of the Boar" (a King Arthur story from the Welsh epic "Mabinogion")
"Finn and Oisin" and "Cuchulain" Finnish epics)
Robin Hood)

5 = Stories That Never Grow Old
(ALL are complete reprints of the original, except where noted:
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Lewis Carroll)
The King of the Golden River (John Ruskin)
Jackanapes (Juliana Horatia Ewing)
A Midsummer Night's Dream (Charles & Mary Lamb)
The Gold Bug (Edgar Allan Poe)
excerpts: Tales from the Travels of Baron Munchausen (Rudolph Eric Raspe)
excerpts: Gulliver's Voyage to lilliput (Jonathan Swift)
excerpts: Don Quixote (Miguel de Cervantes)
Rip Van Winkle (Washington Irving)
A Christmas Carol (Charles Dickens)


6 = Stories About Boys and Girls
(20 works, mostly reprinted chapters from longer works by mostly obscure authors, but includes more well known authors such as: Rachel Field; Louisa May Alcott; Mark Twain with a chapter from Adventures of Tom Sawyer; Booth Tarkington, with a chapter from Penrod; and Kathryn Forbes, with a chapter from Mama's Bank Account)


7 = Stories About Animals
(26 works, mostly reprinted chapters from longer works by mostly obscure authors, but includes more well-known authors such as John Muir; Anna Sewell with a full reprint of her book "Black Beauty"; Jack London with a full reprint of his short story "Brown Wolf"; Eric Knight with a full reprint of his short story "Lassie Come Home"; Marjorie Rawlings with a chapter from "The Yearling"; and Rudyard Kipling with a full reprint of his short story "Moti Guj -- Mutineer")


8 = Stories from History
(22 works, mostly reprinted chapters from longer works by such authors as Howard Pyle with a chapter from his Men of Iron; Andrew Lang; Hendrik Van Loon with 2 chapters from his Story of Mankind; Ester Forbes with a chapter from Johnny Tremain; Carl Sandburg from his biography on Abraham Lincoln; Robert Trumbull with a chapter from his autobiography on surviving a WW2 plane crash and survival in the ocean for 34 days; Ernie Pyle, WW2 war correspondent, with a reprinted article of heroism; chapters from biographies on Abraham Lincoln; an General MacArtherLouisa May Alcott; and a tall tale about The Devil and Daniel Webster)


9 = Sport and Adventure
(24 works, some are reprinted chapters from longer works by mostly obscure authors, but also includes more well-known authors such as: Jack London with a full reprint of his short story "Chased by the Trail"; Howard Pyle with a chapter from his Pirates book; Conan Doyle with a full reprint of his short story "The Red-Headed League"; Robert Byrd with a chapter from his autobiography about flying over the North Pole; and Charles Lindbergh with a chapter from his autobiography about crossing the atlantic in a solo flight)


10 Poetry (and reading index guide to all 10 volumes)
(over 320 poems, with a mix of nursery rhymes; poem riddles; children's poems, and at least 100 of the world's most famous poems (written before 1900) by all the most famous poets )

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Excerpts are often criticized, but I can see how they would give the little ones a taste of great writing without the disturbing bits. The Children's Hour just sets out to give a peek into these longer books -- not a substitute for reading the whole thing later on.

 

Yeah, I as thinking about this too. I think most of the excerpts stand alone in some way, such as the chapter from The Saturdays about the boy going to the circus on his own. But I've got Dr Seuss's Bartholemew Cubbins in one of the Bookshelf books -- that was a surprise! I am not sure what conclusion I've come to about them, frankly, but my son was interested in reading bothSwiss Family Robinson and Phantom Tollbooth after reading an excerpt in I think) Childcraft's Mathemagic volume.

 

Lori D -- how clever to list the readers! I've got some too but not a series, but we did read an excerpt about two boys in Minnesota and a moose, so we ended up reading the whole book (Honk the Moose).

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I want to go shopping at your libraries!:001_smile: Sets start out at $10-20 at my favorite monthly library sale, and I patiently wait until they get moved to the bargain section (2 months later), where I usually buy them for 25 cents/volume (or make an offer).

 

Ack! Sorry, I meant per book not set. This head cold is getting to me. :001_smile:

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I've found almost every vintage set I own at the library book stores in my town. Do you have something like that? For sets I usually pay $1-$2 each.

 

My Book House is worth the hunt! :001_smile:

 

nope, all we have is goodwill. In the next town the library has a sale twice a year but I rarely get to it. It seems every time they have it we're either sick or it's bad weather and I don't get to go.

 

 

there is an old book store in that town, I need to go check it out, it's just getting over there.

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I have a set of 1962 Collier Junior Classics. My older dd read them often when she was 8 or 9. She loved the tales of adventure. I bought the set for $10 at a used book store.

 

I also have a set of My Book House in younger dd's room. They match her color scheme. :D She has spent lots of time rereading the first couple of volumes. She likes the pictures more than those in the other set. I think they were $18 at Half Price Books.

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Well I will try to restrain myself. I'll look for it locally, but I may cave in if I keep coming back to this thread....

 

 

I forgot, I also have this gorgeous complete set (all 16 volumes) of the Golden Encyclopedia. I spent many hours pouring over those as a child! Also from my childhood, I have all but 1 volume of the hardback "white cover" edition of the Wizard of Oz series by Baum. I also have a few volumes from each: the Read Me a Story series, and the Companion Library series (that's a cool set in which you get two complete books -- you flip the book over and upside down for the other work). While those were published new when I was a kid, or not long before I was born, they are all vintage books now. Guess *I* am vintage now! :tongue_smilie:

 

And DH has been so sweet; over the past few years, he has slowly collected via ebay and Amazon used almost the entire set of "Book of..." (fairytale collections) by Ruth Manning Sanders and illustration by Robin Jacques. I adored that series when I discovered them in my local library when I was around 10-12yo. I have really enjoyed re-reading these as an adult; they are better written than most. A friend just gave her daughter a *beautiful* 1920s edition of one of the Andrew Lang fairy books -- gorgeous color illustrations in the Art Nouveau style... sigh... I am really working myself up into "anthology envy" here...

Edited by Lori D.
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I forgot, I also have this gorgeous complete set (all 16 volumes) of the Golden Encyclopedia.

Oh yeah! I have these too! And I bought the Golden Book Encyclopedia of Natural Science too, because the illustrations are so gorgeous!

 

I was tempted -- really tempted -- to buy some of My Book House, but I looked at the contents and it seems so similar to what I already have, that I just don't think I can justify it. Plus I have literally zero shelf space.

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stripe said:
Oh yeah! I have these too! And I bought the Golden Book Encyclopedia of Natural Science too, because the illustrations are so gorgeous!

Wow, those are nice looking!

stripe said:
I was tempted -- really tempted -- to buy some of My Book House, but I looked at the contents and it seems so similar to what I already have, that I just don't think I can justify it. Plus I have literally zero shelf space.

Whew! That helps a little... It's just that the My Book House has the stunning color illustrations (cover and inside) that the Collier's Young Folks Shelf of Books series does not have... I am a sucker for pretty pictures! 🙂

stripe said:
Plus I have literally zero shelf space.

Ah, c'mon, there's always room to squeeze a few more books behind, on top, in stacks on the floor... :tongue_smilie:

Edited by Lori D.

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Oh yeah! I have these too! And I bought the Golden Book Encyclopedia of Natural Science too, because the illustrations are so gorgeous!

 

I was tempted -- really tempted -- to buy some of My Book House, but I looked at the contents and it seems so similar to what I already have, that I just don't think I can justify it. Plus I have literally zero shelf space.

 

Ah come on! Shelf space is for sissies!! :lol: Actually that's what I'm trying to do right now. :001_smile: I can't bring myself to box up and store our history books to make room for my "secret problem" of collecting collections.

 

I've been staring at these rubbermaid containers for weeks now. :glare:

It took me a long time to put them (the history books) in chronological order by date. I love looking at them... WAH!!

But check out this old collection I found!

Must. make. room.

Here are the same books on Etsy: http://www.etsy.com/listing/94868321/reserved-for-hannah-lot-of-3-the-worlds

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I've been staring at these rubbermaid containers for weeks now. :glare:

It took me a long time to put them (the history books) in chronological order by date. I love looking at them... WAH!!

I did that, but my baby rearranges them. Daily.

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That's the set I have too. 1971. Vintage? HA! That means I'm past vintage! :lol: Seriously though, I love them!

 

I also have the Collier Young Folks set from 1958. Love that one too.

 

I would love some Childcraft volumes if they are on science, arts, nature, animals, etc.

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I love this thread! I've just purchased the last four volumes of My Bookhouse -- they looked too lovely to resist. The whole set will have to wait -- they are so pricey!

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I would love some Childcraft volumes if they are on science, arts, nature, animals, etc.

They are. Mathemagic is pretty cool. Here's a blog entry about it:

http://outerhoard.wordpress.com/2008/07/19/memories-of-childcraft/

 

I have some from the 70s and a few more recent ones. The older ones are more interesting, in my opinion. I once sat down with two volumes with the same name from different years and typed up this comparison. It's a thread from 2009 where i answered my own question. :001_huh:

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=115608

Edited by stripe

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Of course, you know this means war. :tongue_smilie: If you are going to post the list of volumes and what's in each, I will too. :tongue_smilie:

Thanks for kicking the challenge up a notch, Lori D ! :tongue_smilie: Seriously, thank you for taking the time to type out those descriptions.

 

 

But check out this old collection I found!

Must. make. room.

Here are the same books on Etsy: http://www.etsy.com/listing/94868321/reserved-for-hannah-lot-of-3-the-worlds

 

Nice find! It reminds me of the Britannica Great Books collection - hardcover, sturdy binding. I saw a collection once, but I blanched at the thought of carting it home (60 books!). Some day, when my dc are in the rhetoric stage..

http://www.britannica.com.au/product.asp?prod=GBHL

 

Does anyone have the Wonderful World of Walt Disney books?

Hmm, I usually see those sold piecemeal (not a set), but I have a good impression of their World of Science volume.

 

Also wanted to briefly mention Disney's set of "How It Works In the City/Country/Home". It's good, but I think this is one area where the newer books (The Way Things Work, David Macaulay) have an advantage b/c they are updated to the gadgets kids actually see.

http://www.amazon.com/How-Works-City-Walt-Disney/dp/0894340468

 

I need to write down which of the 1930's versions of My Book House that I have and try to complete that vintage set. The 1970's is pretty, but not in the same way!

 

If you ever have a chance to buy a set of the Book of Knowledge - they are ah-mazing!!

I'm afraid to ask.. how is the 1930s version different from the 1970s? Not that I need to start another My Book House collection, but I thought the 1970s has the prettiest illustrations among the anthologies I've seen.

 

Also, please do give more detail of what you think about the Book of Knowledge. Encyclopedias are another ball game, as a PP said, but perhaps this is along the lines of living books? I'd love to hear more. :bigear:

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helena said:
Does anyone have the Wonderful World of Walt Disney books?

Oh, wow, yeah! I think we had two of those as kids. Alas, lost now in the mists of time... 😞

Edited by Lori D.

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I have the 1953 "Book of Knowledge" set. It is 20 volumes - each volume will cover something from "The Eighteen Departments of The Book of Knowledge".

 

The great thing, IMO, is all of the articles are written in narrative form to the child. They aren't merely little tidbits of facts, but articles written to children about the topic.

 

I also love that each volume contains many different topics, so they aren't set up in an alphabetical way. Volume 20 has a complete index of the over 7,000 pages of topics.

 

In Volume One -

 

The Earth- The Earths Yearly Journey Around the Sun

 

Science- What are things made of?

 

Wonder Questions -

What is daylight savings?

Do animals talk to one another?

Where does dust come from?

 

Animal Life -

The Great Groups of Animals

Bats, Furry Animals That Fly and Insect-Eaters

 

Plant Life -

The Plant World

 

Familiar Things -

Foothpaths in the Air - a story of bridges 17pgs. with illustrations

The Ship Beneath the Waters

Lighter-than-Air Craft

 

All Countries -

The Great Continent of Asia

The Story of Africa

 

The United States -

The Continent of North America

 

Things to Make and Do -

Telling Stories by means of sticks

 

Poetry -

Indian Children

A Swing Song

 

Famous Books -

What Is a Classic?

 

This is just a small sample of what are in the books. They are real gems - although I have heard that The "New Book of Knowledge" isn't nearly as good.

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I went through the replies and compiled the titles mentioned, noting which post mentions it and including links where possible.

*Ahem* Some posters are obviously book fiends :tongue_smilie: .. thank you for sharing!

 

--------Anthologies----------

 

Book of (Fairytale collections) by Ruth Manning Sanders

#33 - Description and wikipedia link

 

Book Trails

#10 - Link to photo from 1928 edition

 

The Bookshelf for Boys and Girls

#25 - Description and title list for 1966 edition

 

Childcraft

#41 - Link to blog describing Mathemagic (one of the books), and brief comparison of editions.

#41 - Link to comparison thread of editions , also see Valeries Living Books

 

 

The Children's Hour

#5 - Description, suggested age range

#19 - Link to online books and guide

#22 - Link to photo of 1953 edition

 

Collier's Junior Classics

#10 - Brief comparison, 1912 vs 1953

#28 - title list for pre-1960 edition

#32 - link to photo of 1962 edition

 

Collier's Young Folks' Shelf of Books, 1962

#5 - Description, suggested age range

#28 - Title list and description for pre-1960 and post-1960 editions

#39 - Recommendation of 1958 edition

 

Ginn Basic Readers

#5 - Description, suggested age range

#28 - Online link to photo of 1960s edition and title list

 

My Book House

#12, 32 - Link to photo of 1971 edition and price at Half Price Books

#22 - Title list for 1971 edition

 

Through Golden Windows

#25 - Description and title lists for 1958 edition

 

Young Folks' Library

#22 - Compares 1902 and 1919 editions

 

------ Encyclopedia/Non-fiction collections --

Annals of America

#20 - Link to 2005 photo

 

Book of Knowledge

#15 - 1911 online books,

#44 - 1953 sample topical listing

 

Golden Book Encyclopedia Set

#33 - Link to 1960 edition photo and description for pre-1960 edition,

 

Disney's How It Works in the City/Country/Home

#42 - Link to photo of 1980 edition

 

Wonderful World of Walt Disney Books

#37 - 1965 photo

 

World Book, Encyclopedia and Dictionary

#18 - Link to 1917-1918 online books/lesson plans,

 

--- Literary/Great Books collections-------

 

Companion Library

#33 - Description and link to photo of 1960 titles

 

Britannica Great Books Collection

#42 - Link to photo

 

The World's Popular Classics

#36 - Link to photo of 1930s edition

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There are also some nice pictures of the Golden Book Encyclopedia of Natural Science (mentioned in post #34) on Flickr. Most are from someone who cuts the images out for crafts.

Here is a blog entry about it with some pictures:

http://areaderscompanion.blogspot.com/2011/08/golden-book-encyclopedia-of-natural.html

 

Here are some pictures of The Bookshelf for Boys and Girls:

http://www.orangekittycrafts.com/2011/12/bookshelf-for-boys-and-girls.html

http://www.mjenemark.com/2010/06/the-bookshelf-for-boys-and-girls/

and a list of all the volumes in various editions

http://www.bigredtoybox.com/cgi-bin/toynfo.pl?bookshelfindex

 

Here is an interesting excerpt from an interview with artist Joshua Field --

AS: What influences are you drawing from currently?

JF: I've always been interested in poetry; in the way that it references incongruous ideas and assembles them, sometimes tilted on their ear, forcing new associations. I recently acquired a set of old Golden Home and High School illustrated encyclopedias from the 60's which are amazing. They bring together a crazy collection of illustrations that, when taken out of context, have very little direct connection to one another, and yet create fantastic visual clues. I'm currently using selections of that imagery in a ten-foot long narrative painting which unfolds over four canvases.

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In addition to the Golden Book Encyclopedia and Natural History Encyclopedia, there's also a wonderful 16-volume set called the Golden Treasury of Knowledge. It's this wonderful mishmash of articles on science, history, the history of science, geography, biology and art, and the illustrations are just epic.

 

I also just found a four-volume box set called the Golden Treasure Chest, edited by Louis Untermeyer and his fourth wife Bryna, and the volumes are Adventure Stories, Animal Stories, Favorite Classics, Tales and Legends. As a product of Golden Press, it also inevitably features some masterful illustrators (Provensen, et al).

Edited by kubiac
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There are also some nice pictures of the Golden Book Encyclopedia of Natural Science (mentioned in post #34) on Flickr. Most are from someone who cuts the images out for crafts.

Here is a blog entry about it with some pictures:

http://areaderscompanion.blogspot.com/2011/08/golden-book-encyclopedia-of-natural.html

 

Here are some pictures of The Bookshelf for Boys and Girls:

http://www.orangekittycrafts.com/2011/12/bookshelf-for-boys-and-girls.html

http://www.mjenemark.com/2010/06/the-bookshelf-for-boys-and-girls/

and a list of all the volumes in various editions

http://www.bigredtoybox.com/cgi-bin/toynfo.pl?bookshelfindex

 

Here is an interesting excerpt from an interview with artist Joshua Field --

AS: What influences are you drawing from currently?

JF: I've always been interested in poetry; in the way that it references incongruous ideas and assembles them, sometimes tilted on their ear, forcing new associations. I recently acquired a set of old Golden Home and High School illustrated encyclopedias from the 60's which are amazing. They bring together a crazy collection of illustrations that, when taken out of context, have very little direct connection to one another, and yet create fantastic visual clues. I'm currently using selections of that imagery in a ten-foot long narrative painting which unfolds over four canvases.

 

My bolding.

I have this set! I don't even remember buying it. :lol:

I'm looking through it now.

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ETA - It seems (I'm hoping someone who actually owns the set can confirm :) ) that The Children's Hour is arranged by audience age as well, from this content listing.

http://thesmallhousehalfwayupinthenextblock.com/ebay/2008-06-11/books.html

 

It is. I own this one, and a couple/few of the Bookshelf for Boys and Girls.

 

The Children's Hour is primarily excerpts from larger works. The excerpts are not sanitized or abridged in any way. We read them aloud often. From the four year old to the teen my kids will all gather 'round when they see DH or I about to read one. The bite-size pieces are just right for my little ones, and just enough to make my older ones need to find the full version to read the rest of the story. :001_smile:

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I'd been holding off on buying the nature and "make and do" volumes of the Bookshelf ....but my resistance was futile-- aaah!

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