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Asynchrony in action.


Rivka
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I feel like this picture of a RSO Chemistry worksheet perfectly sums up why we homeschool.

 

Alex has written about her favorite element, ununoctium. It's her favorite because (the scan cut off her explanation, which crowds onto and down the margin) "it will be namd after me."( We've had long discussions about curium and einsteinium and rutherfordium and all the other reasons a little girl might hope to someday be immortalized in "alexium.")

 

This sheet is such a fine example of first grade writing and spelling, and who-knows-which-grade thinking/interest. Whole grade acceleration clearly wouldn't work for this kid, because her output is so squarely at age level. On the other hand, how many first grade classes are ready for ununoctium and "Let's pretend you're the Indo-European mother language, and I'm your daughter, Latin"?

 

I'd love to hear what asynchrony looks like at your house.

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My son is reading Harry Potter, doing math 2 grade levels ahead, is a natural speller (he loves Word Jong on Wii for spelling), and knows more abpit Egypt amd Bible history than I dis in High School....yesterday, he asked me "is this (d) a b or a d?" I said "you know...." He informed me....I still get these really confused!" He also writes his 5s backwards quite often....

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I'd love to hear what asynchrony looks like at your house.

 

I've posted this one here before. DS was still memorizing his subtraction tables while working independently on AoPS Intro Algebra. Memory and conceptual mathematical skill are very different things!

 

Ruth in NZ

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:lol::lol:

 

It is a relief to see someone else's dc struggle with handwriting, too! I always want to say to ds8, "How can you know so much about plate techtonics, parts of speech, and Bhutan, but you can't write more than three words on one line?" :glare:

 

Of course, I don't ask him that, but I'd like to . . .

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I've posted this one here before. DS was still memorizing his subtraction tables while working independently on AoPS Intro Algebra. Memory and conceptual mathematical skill are very different things!

 

Ruth in NZ

 

Again, thankful to read something like this. Ds8 is still working on memorizing subtraction tables and continues to work conceptually ahead in math. I keep wondering what is going on!

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My son is reading Harry Potter, doing math 2 grade levels ahead, is a natural speller (he loves Word Jong on Wii for spelling), and knows more abpit Egypt amd Bible history than I dis in High School....yesterday, he asked me "is this (d) a b or a d?" I said "you know...." He informed me....I still get these really confused!" He also writes his 5s backwards quite often....

 

Yeah. On the sidewalk in front of our house is a chalked hopscotch board with half the numbers written backwards. And yet she knows her times tables and can factor numbers and divide with a fractional remainder.

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Yeah. On the sidewalk in front of our house is a chalked hopscotch board with half the numbers written backwards. And yet she knows her times tables and can factor numbers and divide with a fractional remainder.

 

I have to remind myself daily that he is six. If he was in ps, he would be in k and that would be normal....it is normal....

 

Oh and handwriting is going downhill. He had beautiful handwriting last year, now he is gettinglazy with it. I make him erase truly sloppy work. Even his best effort OS not as beautiful as it was a year ago.....

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Dd did her first spelling bee last weekend and finished second even though she was one of the youngest participants. She gleefully skipped to and from the microphone and went back to the wrong seat 4 rounds in a row and had to be redirected by audience members sitting near her. During the trophy presentation she was so focused on trying to open her package of candy she received after she was eliminated that she didn't even realize the moderator was trying to hand her a trophy.

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Dd did her first spelling bee last weekend and finished second even though she was one of the youngest participants. She gleefully skipped to and from the microphone and went back to the wrong seat 4 rounds in a row and had to be redirected by audience members sitting near her. During the trophy presentation she was so focused on trying to open her package of candy she received after she was eliminated that she didn't even realize the moderator was trying to hand her a trophy.

:lol:

Rivka - I think asynchrony looks a little like that here too. Thanks for posting :)

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When the kids aren't around, my husband and I have said many, many, many times to each other "how can they be so smart and so stupid at the same time!?" :lol: It's usually me reminding him of their actual ages and what they should be doing in PS. Handwriting is a huge issue in my house, too. Conceptual level and output level just DON'T go together at all! Any example I could give you would almost certainly have handwriting thrown into it!

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My son has a much slower processing speed than is typical for a child with his verbal and math reasoning scores. He can do word problems amazingly well but a sheet of drills is like Chinese water torture for both of us. His handwriting is quite legible letter by letter but he seems wholly unable to remember to appropriately space his words out. :glare: Like a lot of kids with HFA, writing is a time consuming activity and he does better with word processing on a computer. We need to teach him to type.

 

And sometimes he will struggle with something he knows, like 2 x 8 = 16 but then in the same 1/2 hour period explain, unasked, exactly why a negative times a negative is a positive in his own words or breeze through a tricky word problem. But sit there chewing on what 2 times 8 is for several long minutes and then need to be reminded that he has a full chart of product and quotient facts on the wall that he make and decorated. Absent minded professor like for sure. "Oh! 16!" when it comes to him or he reads it off the wall.

Edited by kijipt
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My son is reading Harry Potter, doing math 2 grade levels ahead, is a natural speller (he loves Word Jong on Wii for spelling), and knows more abpit Egypt amd Bible history than I dis in High School....yesterday, he asked me "is this (d) a b or a d?" I said "you know...." He informed me....I still get these really confused!" He also writes his 5s backwards quite often....

 

That's my son exactly. He gets sooooo frustrated with the b/d thing! He usually catches himself now and says, "I keep doing that!" in a frustrated voice. Poor kid. It got really bad last summer because the physical ability to write took a jump forward, making it easier, but then since it was so easy, he wasn't thinking as much about letter formation. Oh the reversals! :lol:

 

And then there was the time I gave him a sheet of 100 multiplication facts in the table of 5. He started it, then stopped and said, "I can't remember how to make a 5!" Um... there was a 5 in every problem. :lol:

 

Reversals have improved again. I think last week, he only reversed b/d once or twice. :D

 

I'm just being patient with the writing thing. I'm seeing a lot of improvement now. His reversals are getting less and less. I imagine he'll still be doing them some at age 8 (in June), but it should be a lot less than last summer! His physical ability to write is definitely improving quite a bit. We're getting there. I just have to constantly remind myself that he's just 7. It will come. :)

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My 4 year old will fly through pretty average 1st grade work (did SM 1a in a week, and we are starting SM1b after being ill), ETC 1, Basher Biology and Grammar (and she understands the noun does the action and the verb tells what the action is), etc. Yesterday she asked me if we can discuss floods and how they happen and why they are dangerous.

 

Yet she was worried that when we went to the ophthalmologist that to look behind her eyes they were going to cut off her head (she wasn't worried about it just wanted to know what was going to happen), and she also can watch Sprout for HOURS.

 

Oh and I have to modify writing because she still can not write anything in proper scale, despite writing all letters and numbers, they are just either huge or very tiny.

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Asynchony has looked different here at different ages.

 

At From 4-7, it was definitely a difference between conceptual understanding and written output. A meeting with our VA GT coordinator made me :001_huh:, when she said that children capable of reading/understanding at an accelerated level should have no problems completing the required written output at that same level (we stopped pushing for accelerations after that :tongue_smilie:).

 

When my oldest hit 10, and the curriculum (in reading and history), started asking this literal kid to explain motivations of the protagonist, or some historic event... he'd come crying to me, "but it doesn't SAY why." He didn't grapple with the same "logic-stage" science or math topics, but things that required interpretation...UGH. We stepped back from curriculum that required this type of thought, and continued his progression through science and math (now, with math... it's back to skills. The suggestion regarding the use of a different colored pencil for each sign has helped tremendously... erasing many silly mistakes from dropping signs, not distributing the signs properly, etc.). He is also starting to tackle logic-stage reasoning in history and literature with ease. He's still my literal kid, does better with facts and figures than intuiting what an author meant by something that was said, but it is much improved.

 

Not all of my children have experienced the frustrations of asychrony...my oldest dd has thus far escaped.

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So I'm trying to make the case for my young 5yos to be accepted into the Lutheran school's 1st grade next year, even though it's against their policy. Their 1st grade teacher also provides the Sunday School lesson for the KG class. That is the one hour per week when both of my kids decide to act like total lunatics. Why? They have exemplary behavior in school during the week (full-day KG at a different school).

 

And my youngest has lately decided to act like a baby every chance she gets. I have no idea why. She was not always like this!

 

Yet at lunch last Sunday she asked me out of the blue, "what's a standard measure?"

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Here are a couple of examples from our household:

 

Reading chapter books without difficulty (i.e. 4th/5th grade level) and STRUGGLE to identify whether a vowel is short or long in 3 and 4 letter words.

 

Reading and understanding books from authors like Steinbeck, Verne, or Dickens, but not able to define a noun.

 

Starting to read before mastering toilet training.

Edited by Wehomeschool
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Um, does this count?

 

My fifteen-month-old wanted me to 'do letters' with her on the magna-doodle while we were waiting for her sister's gym class to get out. (I write the letter and sing the song from leapfrog, letting her fill in the letter sound.) I tried drawing animal pictures for her instead, because I didn't want to look like showing off to the other parents sitting all around us. She threw the biggest screaming tantrum.

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We were in a little boutique the other day with a friend. The store had a five dollar bill under glass in a little table (I'm assuming it was the first five bucks they made or something). Dd walked up to it, pointed at it, and said, "Look, that's Abraham Lincoln. He was a president and he freed the slaves."

 

Then, when the surprised store owner asked dd her name, my darling child just shrugged and said, "I don't know." *sigh*

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This reminds me of a year ago when my friends took my kids (then about 4) to a fancy international dinner while I stayed home sick. When they got home it was reported that during the speeches, which were accompanied by a slideshow, my kids were hollering out as they saw the photos: "Abraham Lincoln! Mahatma Gandhi! Mother Teresa!" etc. Little brats.

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March 2011, I wrote this about my then 8yo little guy:

 

He is also asynchronous in development. Although he is academically ahead of his age-level peers, his emotional development is right at his age level and his motor skill development (both large muscle group and fine motor skills) may actually be below his age level. So, he may figure the tip on the dinner bill, duck down because the waiter embarrasses him, and then fall out of his chair because he has no sense of balance. He went from being a tiny middle schooler, to a normal second grader, to a giant preschooler in the span of a few minutes.

 

Now, at 9yo-

 

He has no problem doing linear equations in 4 variables. He can type like the wind.

 

He can barely put together a decent paragraph and there is no way he could write an acceptable essay. He can read just about anything you hand him, but he has no desire to sit still and read. His handwriting is so sloppy that sometimes even he has a difficult time deciphering it.

 

He goes from being a high school math student and typist to composing at an elementary school level. Then, he is reading above grade level, but wiggling like a younger child. Also, his motor skills still are not at age level.

Mandy

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and then fall out of his chair because he has no sense of balance.

 

I think there is some special extra-gravital force that pulls little boys out of their chairs. :tongue_smilie:

 

That same force causes their pencils to fall a lot as well, which then causes the chair falling. :glare:

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Asynchrony is a common thing in our house, too. I remember when my dd was 2 or so, a friend told me that if my dd could tell me a paragraph about her diaper, she was probably ready to be toilet-trained. Unfortunately, this was not the case. My dd could read full-length books before she was toilet-trained (she has some sensory issues). She can reason and negotiate like a much a older child, but sometimes acts younger than her 4-year-old brother. It does make it feel a little like I'm walking in sand all the time, and it's constantly shifting! But it makes life interesting, too, so I'm not complaining (much).:D

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I just listened to my 4yo give us a lengthy description of Saturn, its moons, and their relative sizes to the other planets, and then I realized that she was not wearing clothes. So not for the first time, I said "DD, that's great, but could you go put on some underwear?"

 

This is the same kid who wears a cloth diaper to bed still because she refuses to sleep anywhere but the couch, but she can tell you all about the fabric type and its production.

 

I'm not sure if she's an accelerated learner but she sure does have some asynchrony.

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I think there is some special extra-gravital force that pulls little boys out of their chairs. :tongue_smilie:

 

That same force causes their pencils to fall a lot as well, which then causes the chair falling. :glare:

 

I can assure you this force works in our homeschool as well and there is no boy here. Just a soon to be 7yo girl who regularly falls out of her chair and drops pencils.:lol:

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Maybe this is asynchrony - I'm not sure what it was, exactly - in my 4th child, the neglected one, just a little while ago. Ds5, while putting on his pull-up for overnight: "mom, what is negative one minus one?" Me: "negative two." Ds5: "Hmm...ok, what is 200 minus 800?.....is it....negative 600? <giggle giggle giggle>"

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Oh you all are making me feel so much better. It's been a rough week. DS took three days to copy a ten-word sentence (that he picked out!) semi-legibly, but in that three days also read two Horrible Science books, the eighth Gaurdians of Ga'hoole book, dictated an elaborate description of a plasma starship drive, built uncountable numbers of Snap Circuits and Lego models, and had a gigantic, world-ending meltdown over the mere *possibility* of having to sit and listen to a 10-minute Native American myth in a small group setting. Sigh.

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We have very similar issues with our 4 year old who will read 2nd or 3rd grade readers while refusing to put any clothes on, type to her Dad on Skype spelling most things correctly but cannot yet write her full name and is doing first grade worksheets but refuses to do them without her dog sitting by (the dog she still carries to every single event or even shopping trip we go on)

 

She is due to go to a school assessment for kindergarten next week and while she will easily be able to do any academic things they ask of her and has been able to do most of what they will ask since before she was 2 years old, I am afraid that she will cry when she has to go off alone with the teacher. We need to keep her place open in the school in case we do decide to send her as we have not yet made up our minds about homeschooling next year.

Edited by Tanikit
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She is due to go to a school assessment for kindergarten next week and while she will easily be able to do any academic things they ask of her and has been able to do most of what they will ask since before she was 2 years old, I am afraid that she will cry when she has to go off alone with the teacher. We need to keep her place open in the school in case we do decide to send her as we have not yet made up our minds about homeschooling next year.

 

When DS1 went to get assessed for Kindergarten, he passed all the academic stuff with flying colors. Then he got to the scissors portion... The teacher had him cut out a furry face that took up a whole piece of paper. He cut straight across the face, cutting it in half. :lol:

 

We worked on scissor usage that summer. My younger kids know how to cut already, even the 2 year old.

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Last post reminded my of ds8's, the science expert reading at 8th grade level, first week in kindergarten.

 

Wonderful, kind, grandmotherly teacher pulled me aside after the third day of school to say, "Your son knows a lot, doesn't he? We'd like to assess him for the TAG program right away. However, he doesn't know how to use scissors or put his coat on by himself. Maybe you could practice that at home?"

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Last post reminded my of ds8's, the science expert reading at 8th grade level, first week in kindergarten.

 

Wonderful, kind, grandmotherly teacher pulled me aside after the third day of school to say, "Your son knows a lot, doesn't he? We'd like to assess him for the TAG program right away. However, he doesn't know how to use scissors or put his coat on by himself. Maybe you could practice that at home?"

 

:lol: This is totally something that could have happened at our house.

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  • 1 month later...

I had to revise this thread because I'm having a surreal day with DD2 today. She's now 2 years, 4 months, and not only does she talk in full sentences, she frequently says things we don't. I think she's picked some of them up from Thomas & Friends.

 

To start our day off, she got out of bed and came into the bathroom where I was and announced, "Oh, my! I'm making wet on the floor!" Later on, she told me, "Mommy, you must get that for me!" (No one here uses 'must' in a sentence, ever.) She loves the expression, "on my own," as in, "I puta my pants on on my own."

 

Yet, she is in every way still a two year old!

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hmm. *sigh*. reading this makes me understand my child just a bit more. I think my daughter is older than most of your children.

 

She is 12. started at community college at 11 in their music department. 1 class, 1 credit last fall. 1 class, 1 credit this spring. 4.0 GPA currently. 7 credits registered for next fall.

 

last week spelling word: cheek. she spells it: cheeck.

 

robin

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I bought TT 3 for a fun supplement to Singapore for my 1st grade daughter.

 

My son turned 4 in January and has flown through the first 22 lessons in TT3 with ease. He is reading Level 1 and 2 readers and yet has the worst time trying to hold a pencil. Writing his name is torture. He's a little guy and just doesn't have the manual dexterity to work on pencil and paper yet. Though he can cut with scissors better than my 6 year old daughter!

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Here's DD7's science fair project. No problem coming up with a project and designing it, defining variables, doing the project, recording data, doing the math, or creating graphs, charts, and reports on the computer.

 

Cutting out the display pieces and mounting them on the display board, on the other hand...well, it will be obvious that mommy wasn't helping :)

post-14599-13535086564514_thumb.jpg

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Here's DD7's science fair project. No problem coming up with a project and designing it, defining variables, doing the project, recording data, doing the math, or creating graphs, charts, and reports on the computer.

 

Cutting out the display pieces and mounting them on the display board, on the other hand...well, it will be obvious that mommy wasn't helping :)

 

Aw, it looks great! And it's lovely to see a display board that doesn't look like it was created by a professional graphic designer.

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My DD (4.5) was putting on a show for us where she was telling quite creative stories for her age that would have gone on all night if we'd let her. Her Dad made her stop and told her to get into bed as it was well past her bedtime.

 

I went to say goodnight and she said: "It is HARD being a princess! Sometimes I wish I was a witch - then I would turn Daddy to stone!"

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  • 1 month later...

My most asynchronous child is my ds10, but his stuff is more sad then silly. He has been getting OT for 4 years with a large focus on penmanship. He can now write 2 sentences with all the letters correctly sized but spacing is still an issue. I asked this same child to narrate a story to me last week and he dictated a very engaging story about a boy with purple hair that is over 800 words and according to him only half finished.

 

My ds7 and dd5 are quite fun to listen to as they converse in complex sentence using big and unusual words yet talk about Dora and Diego.

 

Today my dd told me about how cochineal are scaled insects in the suborder of Sternorrhyncha which is a suborder of Hemiptera which is the family that hold aphids. And did I know that Ladybugs eat aphids and that "The Very Grouchy Ladybug" is her favorite book and that it reminds her of her big brother. Then spent the next half hour telling me of every cochineal she had ever seen and if it was in a book or in real life. When I asked her why she was so interested in it cochineal she told me it was because my ds is not allowed to eat them any more. 5 minutes later she came in to get a hug and had pink stuff all around her lips. When I asked what it was she said cake mix with cochineal in it. BTW cochineal is Red Dye #40 if you were wondering.

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Starting to read before mastering toilet training.

 

This. Today DD wanted read upside down. So she stood behind my laptop (online book) and read the words upside down. The book was brand new to her, so I know she wasn't doing it by memory. The words aren't that advanced - sad, sam, sis, sid, mad, big, etc - but she only turned three this week. And she's definitely still in diapers.

 

(I know I'm jumping the gun a little bit. Like I said, DD is only three so she's a long way from officially testing gifted. But every other member of our family on both my side and DH's (minus one) was in gifted classes at school. So I assume she is gifted... but I suppose it's premature to say that at this point. :) )

Edited by Dealea86
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  • 3 months later...

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