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art curric that focuses/teaches coloring neatly?


blondeviolin
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Is there some reason you wouldn't just use coloring books and pages?

 

Coloring is all about the small motor skills. I think the main way you improve is just practice.

 

Part of it is she doesn't care to color. All that space to fill in and she is easily overwhelmed. She'd much rather rush through the page to call it "done." More often than not she colors it in any which way which looks like scribbling. When I comment on it, she says it's art and intended to be like that or she colored it like a baby because that's what coloring is...for babies. :glare: I could just make her sit and do a page a day (and probably will with SOTW). I just know she'd probably respond to a specific lesson or sets of lessons that talks about the art of coloring.

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Nothing overly simple... Probably a first grade level art program that addresses coloring techniques when appropriate. I don't know if any of the more commonly used ones do. We'd be just using it once a week or so.

 

On the same subject, anyone know of any good free programs? I don't mind collecting supplies or whatever...

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R&S ABC series focuses some on coloring (teaching them to outline dark and shade lighter). Your DD is beyond those books though. :)

 

My oldest doesn't like to color, and I don't worry about it. I'm finding that as he's gotten older, he's become better at it without me forcing the issue. I do have him draw pictures for notebooking, and he sometimes does his own drawings (stick figures). Recently when he's needed to actually color something, he's colored very well in the lines. It's still not really pretty, but it's getting better.

 

Some advice given to me in the past was to use coloring pages with SMALL spaces to color. Big spaces are harder and more daunting for the pencil-phobic. Small spaces are much more doable. Pictures with small spaces are also less baby-like.

 

We've also done some Draw Write Now. I draw the pictures with my son, so that gives him some encouragement that it's not a "baby" thing. Btw, one day I tried coloring the whole scene on one of those pictures... I think my hand just about fell off! I don't blame my son for not liking to color. :tongue_smilie:

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Kumon has workbooks you can buy in bookstores, and their very first coloring book is a great place to start. The pictures are simple and mostly colored already. There are certain parts where kids finish them off. My ds liked it years ago.

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Seconding the Kumon books. Though they weren't a hit here, Button hates coloring.

 

In his Montessori preschool, instead of coloring an area the children were given a straight edge (ruler, for ex.) and they would fill the region by drawing parallel lines, roughly up-and-down, from left to right across the region, running their colored pencils down the edge between the borders of the area, shifting the edge over a bit, repeat. For a left-handed child, go right to left. This is what we do when I really want him to fill a region (our hand-drawn continent map). Or I let him fill it with squiggles, whatever.

 

But if coloring per se is what you're after, that won't do it. What do you want her to color? Could you just assign a coloring book and teach her how to color it carefully, a bit at a time?

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My ds is the same. He's 5. In the past it was a struggle. I had to step back and take baby steps. I took markers away because they encourage squiggling instead of filling up.

 

Something which has helped has been beading. DS loves working with beads and I found this in turn is helping with his fine motor skills.

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Thank you for starting this thread. Just last night I was thinking I still have made no progress in finding a coloring curriculum.

 

Over the decades I have learned to color by inferring how it should be done, but was never instructed in how to do it. Just like phonics, handwriting and so many other things. I have dragged myself along inferring and figuring it to by the seat of my pants, but never TAUGHT. I am enjoying going back and finding systematic instruction on how to do the basics.

 

I guess I need to buy the Artpac 1 and see if that is good enough.

 

I think I am going to splurge on some beeswax crayons and nice colored pencils and explore Waldorf art techniques a bit more.

 

Your daughter is lucky to have you. The "just do it" method of teaching isn't very effective for any skill, and art skills are certainly no exception.

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This might not be what you are looking for, but we love books like the following. Really, any doodling books are wonderful though.

http://www.amazon.com/Anti-Coloring-Book-Creative-Activities-Ages/dp/0805068422/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1329313605&sr=8-1

My son went gaga for these a while back - http://www.amazon.com/Monster-Doodles-Fiona-Watt/dp/0794525504/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1329313933&sr=1-1

 

I remember reading parts of Young at Art when my kids where quite a bit smaller. After reading that, I had decided I didn't want to introduce coloring books. Instead I encouraged them to create their own work rather than finishing someone else's. It's worked really well for us and I can see the artist in both my kids now, and I love seeing their pure joy in creating!

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Maybe she doesn't see the point. To some kids it's sort of dull and mindless.

 

Does she like to draw? That requires more skill than simply coloring in an already made picture.

 

As for SoTW, I don't think SWB had visions of kids being made to color those pages/maps. If you look at the teacher manual, all that is expected is labeling a city or coloring a river blue etc.

 

Two of my kids hated crayons. It was a texture thing. I got them (one @ age 5) some highly detailed Dover coloring books and colored pencils--but did not require anything. They did surprisingly well with those, and I relaxed knowing they had managed to figure out how to use their hands just fine in spite of not coloring.

 

Coloring could increase stamina, but other than that, I don't really see it having much value (for most kids) on its own. Especially if they hate it.

 

How did we teach fine motor skills before crayons and the coining of that term anyway? Someone should invent a time machine so we can ask Leonardo Da Vinci. :D

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Maybe she doesn't see the point. To some kids it's sort of dull and mindless.

 

I must admit that is why I asked my earlier question because I can't see the point of learning to color neatly.

 

I was thinking maybe it could have been a older student using a college coloring book (About human body muscles, atoms...?) and having difficulty getting the color perfect.

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Art With a Purpose. That isn't *all* it does, but it does do that. :) You can find it at Rainbow Resources, Shekinah Curriculum Cellar, Rod and Staff Publishers, and others.

 

I agree with this. It is also inexpensive. For those that don't understand the importance of coloring, it is a small motor skill that can be helpful with other things. For instance, I have a 10 year old that still has some handwriting difficulties and I think I probably should have valued the coloring thing more when she was younger to help her with some of that.

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None of my boys liked to color. They are still allergic.. Coloring neatly??? REALLY??? Honestly, this is the reason I never have nor never will do art in my homeschool. I got minuses in art all through elementary school. My art teacher hated me and I could never do it right. I'm sorry. I do not make any kids color. My daughter enjoys it. But I will never make my boys do it period. Yall are sick.

 

Why the rudeness?

 

I think it's a little silly to get a whole curriculum for it, or to push it past a certain point, but it really is tied to readable handwriting and other small motor skills that kids who don't love coloring may need.

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I just remember going to PS and thinking coloring was busywork. In a lot of ways, to a point, I still do. BUT, I realize the fine motor skills it builds. I also remember being in first grade and being laughed at because I didn't "color right." I was the child that could do all of the other work with ease (in some points becoming the tutor of the other kids). So, I was really sensitive when all of my coloring pages were laughed at and mocked. It wasn't even on my radar to compare my coloring to another's and see those techniques or differences. I KNOW it's not on Abby's radar, especially not being in a PS where it is done more frequently with other kids around. While I don't think anyone she associates with would be that rude, I still wouldn't want her to be embarrassed as she ages...if that makes any sense.

 

It looks like Artpacs/Art With a Purpose would be good for us. I am assuming these books are consumable?

Edited by blondeviolin
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My daughter does not like to colour either and I do not expect it of her. There are two things that drive colouring neatly - the fine motor skills and the desire to do so.

 

Competition helps too. My own daughter coloured a small picture very neatly and then showed me telling me if her cousin saw it she wouldn't believe it or be able to colour so neatly and then proceeded to colour the rest of the pictures by scribbling just to get finished. She knows exactly how to colour neatly but has very little desire to most of the time.

 

I don't think that colouring neatly can really be taught but rather encouraged. I find my daughter colours her own drawings more neatly than she will a picture given to her to colour.

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My daughter does not like to colour either and I do not expect it of her. There are two things that drive colouring neatly - the fine motor skills and the desire to do so.

 

I agree with this.

 

I wonder if you give your daughter a picture and tell her that if she can color it in really neatly then you wouldn't make her color anything for X amount of time.

 

That way you can see if perhaps she already has the fine motor ability that you are hoping to foster. (Assuming that is why you are interested in promoting coloring)

 

(This is assuming that she has no interest and desire to color. If she does then please ignore the above suggestion)

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I really don't understand this :-0

 

To DRAW often requires COLORING in parts of the drawing. A coloring page is just a template, to assist a child who doesn't have the time or skill to do the drawing from scratch. Providing templates and examples for imitation are commonly accepted methods to teach in all subjects.

 

Has the use of coloring pages been abused by some teachers? Yes, but that doesn't mean coloring pages, and especially learning to neatly color in a section of a drawing is wrong.

 

I was 13 before a teacher in Bermuda pointed out to me that I was supposed to color in one direction, instead of just haphazardly fill in an area. I was doing a drawing, not a coloring page, and she didn't take the time to teach me further. I know she was shocked at my scribbling, but just let it go as did most of my other teachers who didn't understand my American education, but didn't have time to fix it.

Edited by Hunter
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I've told this joke on myself before, but when my son went to Kindergarten there was so much coloring work I complained to my wife that our child was going to "coloring school."

 

Boy did I need to eat my words, as his writing skills (along with those of the rest of his class) went from quite sloppy to quite neat due to the practice using the fine motor skills of coloring with colored pencils.

 

Encouraging small movements in tight spaces using colored pencils (not crayons) is really helpful. The Dover coloring books are particularly good about having areas of fine detail, and they come in many themes.

 

Bill

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My son was reluctant to coloring, but now has terrific coloring skills. What worked for us was getting high interest coloring books with small spaces and a nice box of colored pencils. The Dover ones are nice, but his absolute favorite was a dollar store coloring book called "T-Bots" that was a total rip-off of Transformers. He thought it was the coolest thing ever and there were tons of little buttons and components on the robots to color. He colored them, named them, and plastered the fridge with them. Best "curriculum" ever and it cost less than $5.

 

ETA - I also let him stay up past usual bed time and have a nice snack if he was coloring quietly at the table. It was a good motivator to take his time.

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I think I am going to splurge on some beeswax crayons and nice colored pencils and explore Waldorf art techniques a bit more.

 

Your daughter is lucky to have you. The "just do it" method of teaching isn't very effective for any skill, and art skills are certainly no exception.

 

My son went to a Waldorf before hs. There were certainly reasons for leaving, but art done as Waldorf does it was excellent. I'd highly recommend Waldorf art supplies and techniques at the young ages. And using the big beeswax blocks (big Papa Bear edge) allows a lot of color to go on fairly quickly. Then they learned to use the smaller Mama Bear side for smaller areas, and the Baby Bear edge for the finest work. Nothing was do color-in of coloring books style. Blending of more than one color over each other was also used.

 

Ideally art was supposed to be combined with other subjects, not an add on--things like making their own beautiful alphabet books where, for example, a B was the shape for a butterfly or bear. One has to realize though that the children are children. Models of Waldorf books one sees are usually ones done by adults for the children to copy, few children can draw a really excellent bear at the stage of learning B. However, since it was not color-in work, it would allow for artist level work if a child were so inclined and able --certainly not a baby thing.

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My dh was one of those top-of-the-class students, skipped up a grade in early elementary, etc. EXCEPT he hated coloring. Thought it was silly, useless, boring, etc. As an adult he now has HORRIBLE handwriting and he is sometimes embarrassed by it. I'm not sure which comes first, the chicken or the egg :confused:, but it certainly makes me think now that I have little ones. So yeah, I tend to think that there is something to all of this and it isn't a crazy question to ask. As to how far you take it...well I'm sure there is a balance in there for each person.

 

My 5.25 yo is just now showing a little initiative with coloring/crafty stuff. I hadn't pushed it before--simply gave him access to some art supplies. One thing that has helped a lot recently was giving him colored pencils instead of crayons. I think he enjoys them so much more because he feels like he has better control and precision with the tip of the pencils. We still haven't gotten into technique, but I know there is one for artists who do chalk/pencil/charcoal drawings (proper shading). I would agree with finding something more detailed to practice with. The large white spaces that must be filled in are tiring and boring.

 

It sounds like your biggest challenge may be finding something to inspire her--something she wants to do (and do well). I have some links in my Pinterest board below for free printable coloring sheets in very detailed patterns. Maybe she could design a project for a specific thing.

Thinking out loud here...does she need some new artwork in her room? What if you found a great printable pattern or picture she likes and have her choose some nice colors to coordinate with the room, then put it in an inexpensive frame and hang it on the wall. Ya know, make it a big design project. Or does she (or anyone else in the family) have something like a 3-ring binder that needs a "special" cover on it? Maybe if she felt like it had a purpose and would be used and seen on a regular basis she would approach it differently. My oldest has long been obsessed with maps, globes, and atlases and he has recently tried drawing or copying maps on his magnadoodle. I'm hoping to use this as an opportunity to have him do some bigger art/fine-motor skill projects (while tackling some geography too, of course). Sorry for being so long and rambly. I'm just wondering about all of this too these days...

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I did not read the responses so I apologize if this is repeating advice.

My dd hated coloring but loved markers. She also hated "baby" coloring books with big wide spaces to color...too tiring. She did enjoy using the fine line markers in Dover coloring books. Even now she prefers markers over colors when drawing. Does she hate all art work or just coloring? If it is just colors, I would try markers.

 

Barry Stebbing has art books (Lamb's Book of Art and I can DO All Things that teaches coloring by using lines among other things) Very quick and easy lessons.

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:confused: Is there a "correct" way to color? I've never heard of such a thing.

 

Well, there are efficient ways and there are neater ways and there are prettier ways, which are all worthy of learning.

 

I've only skimmed a couple of the Classical Writing books, but would't learning certain coloring technique be comparable to learning copia in writing? Having tools at one's disposal to use as one sees fit, when one is trying to accomplish something, they believe to be of significance.

 

When I followed the teacher's directions to start over and color my runners and background, with crayon strokes laid down deliberately, in one direction and with planning, I agreed with the teacher that my drawing looked better and she picked it to put up on the wall.

 

I've studied a bit of pen and ink drawing and creating texture with lines is important. I would think the crayon strokes would work the same way. I would like to find a coloring curriculum that is as helpful as the pen and ink ones I have seen.

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:confused: Is there a "correct" way to color? I've never heard of such a thing.

 

To build fine motor skills I'm told the best way is to use colored pencils (not crayons) and to encourage the students to use small up and down movements.

 

This may (or may not) be the best technique for "artistic" purposes, but this is what is suggested for building up handwriting skills.

 

Bill

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Well, there are efficient ways and there are neater ways and there are prettier ways, which are all worthy of learning.

 

I guess I never thought of needing to be taught such things. I assumed that coloring, if the child wanted, would get better through experience. I haven't instructed any of my kids on how to color, but their coloring gets better over time. I haven't required them to color either.

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:confused: Is there a "correct" way to color? I've never heard of such a thing.

 

I think it's a matter of neatness. As said up thread, coloring helps fine motor skills. It also builds up muscle strength for handwriting. My history teacher in eighth grade taught me how to color properly for mapwork. I wouldn't consider it a very important skill, but it is one I expect from my kids' mapping and notebook pages.

 

To color neatly, you should use colored pencils, not crayons. The color should be filled in at a forty-five degree angle and colored using short strokes. Color lightly and there shouldn't be too much overlap between the stroke groups.

 

I don't think you need a separate curriculum. I'd recommend high interest coloring books. Googling black and white coloring pages will pull up many websites with free pictures. If you notebook for history or science, sit with your child and work on his coloring skills. I wouldn't expect a full 8.5x11 sheet colored, but half a page is doable. My kids are doing a state study right now and we color the state flag together. It's only taken a few gentle reminders and the work quality has approved over time.

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I guess I never thought of needing to be taught such things. I assumed that coloring, if the child wanted, would get better through experience. I haven't instructed any of my kids on how to color, but their coloring gets better over time. I haven't required them to color either.

 

There are so many skills that many children do get better at, if left to figure it out on their own. But they reach a point where they stop getting better. And if the parents and peers and maybe even grandparents also halted at that same point, no one even has the vision of what is possible. And no one knows there is a more efficient way and maybe even a "better" way.

 

I figured out a LOT of spelling on my own by just reading, but that certainly didn't substitute for a Spalding type spelling curriculum. I've always been called a "good speller" and a "natural speller". Rubbish! it's a crying shame that no one ever TAUGHT me to spell.

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I love coloring. :001_wub: When I was a kid, I always was told how much better I colored than my brother....who was 2 years older than me. I'm sure he wasn't all too thrilled to hear that. Something I do (that he never did, by the way), that produces nice results, is to outline the inside of the shape/area you are going to color; this is done a little bit darker than regular coloring. The thicker outline of wax you just made tends to make a natural "stop" to your crayon so it's less likely you'll color outside the lines. Then you color inside your outline a little bit lighter. Color in one direction back and forth (let's just say left to right; back and forth). Then you do the other direction.....up and down, up and down. This is kind of cross-hatching technique; which results in pretty much any possible white space being completely covered in color. It tends to smooth out the lines too. No need to have a heavy hand; coloring heavy/dark will end up wearing you out (again, something my brother would do). Save the heavy coloring for your outlines or special smaller areas you want to pop. Use a good crayon, like Crayola. Rose Art and other "off brands" are not nearly as good. It's also nice to have a good battery operated crayon sharpener. It's a world of difference to color when you have a nice sharp crayon. Worn down and flat crayons are sure to be a coloring kill joy.

Edited by ~AprilMay~
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