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I won't ressurect a new thread but...


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I am so sorry, I have to comment a moment here ladies and gentlemen.

 

I know I am new to these forums generally, and try to stay out of drama because it is not worth it but I noticed some old threads in the related topics at the bottom of the screen while searching for another thread.

 

There are several like this one

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=315007&highlight=PA+homeschooling

 

 

Now... just a comment.

 

Many of the people who hate HSLDA have every right to do so. They are a conservative group. BUT I am going to go out on a limb and ASSUME most of you did not homeschool in the 80's or 90's. The freedoms that so many parents have today is a BLESSING! I started being homeschooled in '85 and graduated in '96.

 

You all have no idea how hard it was to get anything like HSLDA started...and just how many people were summoned to court, and threatened with fines, or jail time. It was ONLY the fact that my mother had HSLDA in her back pocket that she didn't literally almost cry every time she went in to the school district's office to drop off scope and sequence or portfolios.

 

This organization was the only one out there, be grateful that you have choices today in organizations to help you, be grateful to have laws in your home states that allow you to homeschool without intrusion (let alone pure fear).

 

It was not always this way... there was a huge horrible movement to make homeschoolers look terrible... it is only a fraction today of what it was then.

 

Many companies have adgenda's Susan G. Komen funds Planparenthood comes to mind... yeah, HSLDA doesn't hide how it does things or thinks about things... but I will tell you. Without them many many parents would not have been able to exercise their rights to choose their child's schooling... oh and CHARTER SCHOOLS didn't exist that I know of back then. It was PS or Homeschool period. No choices really.

 

I saw reference to how HSLDA does back room deals... does anyone realize that ALL politics are done in the back room?

 

Sorry, I just couldn't not say something...this is not a sopabox over HSLDA really, it is a reality check for ALL secular, conservative, and inbetween. I have no doubt people who were secular belonged to HSLDA without thought back in the 80's and 90's because they needed them.

 

Different world today... I have long been looking for other mothers and fathers who were homeschooled and are now homeschooling. I have found very few here, which is interesting...but I am already fatigued by fighting just a little of the anti-hs current out there... many just have no idea what it was like back then.

 

...and for the record I LOVED being Homeschooled, and so proud my parents went against social norms...I am much more socialized person for it.

 

ducking off my soapbox, proceed to throw tomatoes.

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Thanks for the reminder that things weren't always as easy for homeschoolers as they are now. I think many of us do take that for granted, and we shouldn't.

 

I always find it interesting to read about people who were homeschooled as children and then went on to homeschool their own dc. Were your reasons for chosing homeschooling the same as your parents' reasons? Do you find that you use the same general approach your parents used, or have you chosen a different path?

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This is factually wrong.

 

Dr. Pat Johnson of Clonlara, Raymond and Dorothy Moore, and John Holt were all involved in homeschooling advocacy in the early days.

 

awesome to know... sorry wasn't trying to be incorrect... certainly was thinking more along the lines of we have thousands of umbrella groups and advocacy groups, and Coops (which all were in our basements back then).

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I'm confused as to the point of your post.

 

Do you want discussion about something, or are you simply wanting to share the fact that you support the HSLDA?

:iagree: Me, too.

 

I can agree that yes, back in the day homeschooling was a lot harder.

 

Everyone is entitled to their opinion. Even you. But coming along and opening this can of worms out of the blue is going to get... what exactly?

 

Yes, HSLDA has supporters. They also have those that see no reason to join or even support what they do. So what?

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Thanks for the reminder that things weren't always as easy for homeschoolers as they are now. I think many of us do take that for granted, and we shouldn't.

 

I always find it interesting to read about people who were homeschooled as children and then went on to homeschool their own dc. Were your reasons for chosing homeschooling the same as your parents' reasons? Do you find that you use the same general approach your parents used, or have you chosen a different path?

 

This was the point of my thread.

 

I never thought I would homeschool. I had a great experience but being the one homeschooled is easier than what I perceived my mother's sacrifice to be. It is a different time now, but the enormous task of SAHM and school teacher is daunting to me who is just at the beginning of this road with 2 (and a third) littles.

 

I personally chose it because when my first was born I realized I had NO IDEA what public school or private school was all about. So I went on a hunt with every intention of putting my son in one of those two options. What I found quickly was that my school system (which apparently ranks high in our state) was not teaching near to the level I had hoped.

 

I started working on a Charter School that 2 years later was just turned down by the board of education... so it will be homeschooling for us...at least for now. We are actually doing great...and I love it. My husband is completely supportive and maybe it just took me a while to get over my own fears as the sole educator for my children. :)

 

 

oh and for the record....

I did read many of the statements in the threads. I didn't just look at the titles. :confused: I know many spoke highly of other groups. It was more the fact that people just take for granted what an awesome system of laws we have now... as in people don't go to court or even have the system bat an eyelash when their children don't read. That would not have happened years ago... although there were still families who didn't make homeschoolers look very smart or committed.

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:iagree: Me, too.

 

I can agree that yes, back in the day homeschooling was a lot harder.

 

Everyone is entitled to their opinion. Even you. But coming along and opening this can of worms out of the blue is going to get... what exactly?

 

Yes, HSLDA has supporters. They also have those that see no reason to join or even support what they do. So what?

 

No I wasn't trying to open a "can of worms" about HSLDA supporters or not. Not at all... I am in total shock how many do not even know the history of homeschooling. Maybe I just lived and schooled in a difficult state.

 

It isn't out of the blue... the discrimination thread active right now, and the PA thread from last week that talked about people having to turn in portfolios and resenting (understandably) the intrusion. I guess I am getting at intrusion was not the fear back then...that was life... today intrusion is about as bad as it gets (Thank goodness).

 

If you look at my thread history, you will see I am not a drama stirrer... at all:001_huh:

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I didn't say read the statements in the threads. I said read the links and articles. Some are written by people who were there and disagree with actions taken by HSLDA. Just because people come to different conclusions does not mean they are unaware of the history.

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I'm a homeschool graduate (granted, I was only homeschooled my final two years, but they count). I remember my family being very upset at something like HSLDA back in the late-80's and 90's (I don't know if it was). Florida had no legislation regarding homeschooling back then. All of a sudden, this group started meddling and pushing for regulations (to make homeschooling officially "legal" -- when it hadn't been illegal in the first place). Thanks to this group, homeschoolers who were operating under-the-radar were suddenly thrust into the legislative spotlight and then the fight began.

 

Today, we homeschool, but we don't belong to HSLDA (mainly because they take a heavy-handed approach to public-school-at-home options, have historically been "against" things like the Tebow bill, take sides in things like the YE/OE Creation, the heavy-handed approach to homeschool debate, of which I was a founding board member), among other things.

 

I do belong to a very Christian association run by a classmate of my, David Gibbs. While David and I might not agree on everything, his approach has been much less legalistic than HSLDA's. A funny aside, I heard about his group because of the YE/OE Kerfluffle. He was the attorney brought in to help mediate the dispute. I very much liked his attitude. Unfortunately, Homeschool associations who are "in bed with" HSLDA do not allow him to participate in their vendor fairs. It's as if there is an agenda to keep his organization at arms length.

 

As a former homeschooler, and sibling to two others, we homeschool primarily for academic reasons. I follow the laws as they are outlined for the state in which we reside, mainly because my dh works for the DoD and must maintain clearances. I will not put him in the position of losing his job because we fudged something (my mother is a bit frustrated we register and test...but oh well.)

 

When my oldest was a couple of years younger, he wanted to go to "school," now that he has regular conversations with kids of his own age regarding school at scouts, he has no desire to attend that institution. My oldest dd has never had any kind of inclination, nor has my 8yo son.

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You say you are fatigued fighting the anti- homeschool current, and yet your children are so young.

 

I want to tell you I have home schooled for 9 years without ever really having any negative responses. It's not that hard. If you have negative family members and friends, you may have to select where you spend your time. But for me, homeschooling had been no big deal, and I don't really credit HSLD with that, though they do some ok work. I personally would hire my own attorney if I needed one. I would not give HSLD my money, but that doesn't mean they have never done any good.

 

Anyway, homeschooling has been great and I hope it will not always feel like a battle to you.

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I'm a homeschool graduate (granted, I was only homeschooled my final two years, but they count). I remember my family being very upset at something like HSLDA back in the late-80's and 90's (I don't know if it was). Florida had no legislation regarding homeschooling back then. All of a sudden, this group started meddling and pushing for regulations (to make homeschooling officially "legal" -- when it hadn't been illegal in the first place). Thanks to this group, homeschoolers who were operating under-the-radar were suddenly thrust into the legislative spotlight and then the fight began.

 

Today, we homeschool, but we don't belong to HSLDA (mainly because they take a heavy-handed approach to public-school-at-home options, have historically been "against" things like the Tebow bill, take sides in things like the YE/OE Creation, the heavy-handed approach to homeschool debate, of which I was a founding board member), among other things.

 

I do belong to a very Christian association run by a classmate of my, David Gibbs. While David and I might not agree on everything, his approach has been much less legalistic than HSLDA's. A funny aside, I heard about his group because of the YE/OE Kerfluffle. He was the attorney brought in to help mediate the dispute. I very much liked his attitude. Unfortunately, Homeschool associations who are "in bed with" HSLDA do not allow him to participate in their vendor fairs. It's as if there is an agenda to keep his organization at arms length.

 

As a former homeschooler, and sibling to two others, we homeschool primarily for academic reasons. I follow the laws as they are outlined for the state in which we reside, mainly because my dh works for the DoD and must maintain clearances. I will not put him in the position of losing his job because we fudged something (my mother is a bit frustrated we register and test...but oh well.)

 

When my oldest was a couple of years younger, he wanted to go to "school," now that he has regular conversations with kids of his own age regarding school at scouts, he has no desire to attend that institution. My oldest dd has never had any kind of inclination, nor has my 8yo son.

 

yeah, I really don't know as much about HSLDA in recent years, partly the reason I was going looking. I too have heard bad things, and wanted to see what other options are out there.

 

I know many people wanted to fly under the radar...but we couldn't do that for 12 years...and our neighbors etc. would have had her thrown in jail in a very quick righteously indignant heartbeat. In PA it just wasn't an option. There were law against it and school districts were pushing it.

 

I will admit while growing up my perspective was limited to the laws in only a few states. I have been trying to expand those horizons.

 

My mom wanted a hands off, leave my to school my child in peace approach too but she also did fight for the right to have what she needed from the school district. I don't know what she would think about school sports like the Tebow bill right now... but she did have 5 children (some adopted) who needed therapies that the school could provide...and she would not have been able to afford otherwise. She fought it on the grounds that we pay school taxes too. I guess you could consider her a middle of the road person in that light.

 

I personally don't want to see tons of regulation and oversight either. I don't know if I would take a school up on it sports program, but I do know that if my child had the chance as a scholarship to a great college because of his ability to play on a great local public school team...or anything like that I might feel differently. Sports were in our backyard, community associations were not what they are now. in the 80's and 90's it was mostly through school. I know I would have LOVED to be able to participate in school band!

 

One thing I love is that there are great groups out there who are very loving and accepting. No matter if you have been homeschooled or not being a mom trying to choose an education path is not easy at the beginning...there is a lot to choose from these days LOL. We are really enjoying the beginnings of it.

Edited by Abeth78
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yeah, I really don't know as much about HSLDA in recent years, partly the reason I was going looking. I too have heard bad things, and wanted to see what other options are out there.

I've read all those negative comments, and I will continue to support HSLDA with all my heart. Most of them are half truths, or twisted "truth," written by people who were opposed to HSLDA from the beginning and were looking for information to support their own views. I say "most" of them just in case there's a grain of truth in one or two.

 

And that's all I have to say on the issue. Arguing with HSLDA detractors is like getting in the pigpen to wrestle the pig: the pig likes it and you get dirty.

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......and maybe it's me, but how does one 'resurrect' a 'new thread?'

 

:001_huh:

 

That made me giggle.

 

And I'm not going to give HSLDA credit for which they are not due. They weren't the only people "back in the old days" and in several instances TODAY, they are doing more harm than good.

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I was grateful for HSLDA back in 1988 when we began hs'ing in Northern Virginia. Even though I had filed all required paperwork, I had some rude, crusty-sounding man from the ps system calling me wanting to know 'where my kids were'. HSLDA was a great comfort back then.

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I know many people wanted to fly under the radar...but we couldn't do that for 12 years...and our neighbors etc. would have had her thrown in jail in a very quick righteously indignant heartbeat. In PA it just wasn't an option. There were law against it and school districts were pushing it.

 

I will admit while growing up my perspective was limited to the laws in only a few states. I have been trying to expand those horizons.

 

My mom wanted a hands off, leave my to school my child in peace approach too but she also did fight for the right to have what she needed from the school district. I don't know what she would think about school sports like the Tebow bill right now... but she did have 5 children (some adopted) who needed therapies that the school could provide...and she would not have been able to afford otherwise. She fought it on the grounds that we pay school taxes too. I guess you could consider her a middle of the road person in that light.

 

Each state is different, just like today. I thank God we aren't in PA...lol. Virginia (imo) has just about the right mix of accountability and freedom, but I will admit that having a bit more freedom is always nice ;). There is also the religious exemption (which I can't in good conscience use, I feel called to direct the education of my children, but not necessarily that homeschooling is the only option I could live with due to my faith).

 

I have always felt that having a "Tebow" option would be a great opportunity for homeschoolers. Giving up band and speech/debate was the most difficult thing for me when I chose to come home. In the end, I went with the freedom to learn vs. being held back as more important than my love for those activities. If I can make it so for my children, they will be able to have both the freedom to learn and the freedom to participate in extra-curricular activities they may be qualified for (which right now would be limited to things like chess club, speech/debate, and swimming).

 

I also fight for more parental school choices...period... without fear of the government using things like public-school-at-home options as justification to "do away" with homeschooling. I have seen this battle up close and personal, and it is filled with unbelievable amounts of hyperbolic twaddle, and no basis in reality. Because the reality is, the families who leave this option (and do so in very high numbers), usually leave for one of two reasons: (a) they weren't fit to homeschool in the first place, it's just too hard, kids go back to b&m school or (b) they get their feet wet, explore other things about homeschooling and leave to homeschool completely on their own with a lot more freedom. I have met more "b's" than "a's." But, I'm sure public school teachers have met more "a's" than "b's"...lol.

 

I'm glad for the freedoms and the choices we have now. I can't be the only one out there who remembers when BJU and Abeka would not sell to home schoolers. I can't be the only one whose pastor preached vehemently against homeschooling (as I sat in the pews), or heard the same refrain in college. I can't be the only one who remembers going to the "Dump" (not in the trash sense) to get a hold of textbooks no longer "suitable" for the local schools. I am so grateful for the options my children have, and for those who fought before me. And like them, I will continue to this fight.

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Arguing with HSLDA detractors is like getting in the pigpen to wrestle the pig: the pig likes it and you get dirty.

 

:iagree:That pretty much sums up most conversations about HSLDA on this board.

 

Regardless, I think we do have to give credit where credit is due to the organizations that helped bring homeschooling into the norm, as it is more so today.

 

I also think that HSLDA is ONE approach to bringing that type of change about.

 

I think Focus on the Family was different in the 80's and then it became more political in it's approach until finally Dr. Dobson left and Focus on the Family continues in its path of political involvement.

 

There is a place for HSLDA just as there is a place for Planned Parenthood. I don't agree with Planned Parenthood nor would I knowingly give them a dime of my money even though they do lots of "good" things other than abortions. I think those that want to dislike HSLDA have similar opinions (or that is the benefit of the doubt I give them).

 

HSLDA is ONE approach to ensuring rights for homeschoolers. Not everyone wants to do the under-the-radar approach. Many homeschoolers follow curriculum and have a formal approach to schooling, which is the easiest to defend in court and thus strongly promoted by HSLDA (aka for obvious practical reasons). Other approaches such as unschooling aren't as easy to defend in court but work very well for some families.

 

There is certainly a place for HSLDA. Their approach may not always work, but their approach and the work they have done has certainly contributed to the homeschooling freedoms we enjoy today. I think it is only right to allow credit where credit is due. And I appreciate the OP's reminding us of this.

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I am in total shock how many do not even know the history of homeschooling. Maybe I just lived and schooled in a difficult state.

 

Well, I don't know the history of homeschooling. It never occurred to me that it was a part of homeschooling. I think it's important to understand the laws of the home state but I'm surprised to hear someone say they are in "total shock" over someone who doesn't know the history of homeschooling. Obviously it's great that people did what they did, but I don't feel a need to pay tribute to them. I find that such a strange idea.

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Well, I don't know the history of homeschooling. It never occurred to me that it was a part of homeschooling. I think it's important to understand the laws of the home state but I'm surprised to hear someone say they are in "total shock" over someone who doesn't know the history of homeschooling. Obviously it's great that people did what they did, but I don't feel a need to pay tribute to them. I find that such a strange idea.

 

It's kind of like studying history in school. It matters today ONLY in terms of understanding why things are the way they are.

 

You can live without knowing any history and function perfectly fine, but life is so much the richer and you understand things better when you come to humps in the road if you know a little bit of history.

 

If you life in the US, you celebrate all sorts of holidays that pay tribute to historical events - the founding of our country (4th of July), those who fought for our country (Memorial Day), the founding fathers (President's Day), etc.

 

So it isn't quite so shocking as you might think.

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While I believe really strongly in the right to homeschool, some of the side distracting issues that HSLDA has supported are things that I'm possibly even more adamantly against (or for that they're against, or whatever) than I am for homeschooling. I don't mind strange bedfellows, but I'm not going to support a group with whom I actually disagree on a number of things.

 

And I second the idea that I don't feel like it has not been my experience that there's some huge anti-homeschooling feeling. I have only a couple of times encountered the homeschool naysayers irl.

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Well, I don't know the history of homeschooling. It never occurred to me that it was a part of homeschooling. I think it's important to understand the laws of the home state but I'm surprised to hear someone say they are in "total shock" over someone who doesn't know the history of homeschooling. Obviously it's great that people did what they did, but I don't feel a need to pay tribute to them. I find that such a strange idea.

 

I don't think the OP is looing for people to "pay tribute" to the ones who have gone before, but more a general understanding/awareness that things weren't as "easy" as they are now, and we should be grateful for those who helped make it so. By being aware, we may also become more diligent to continue fighting for those freedoms, because they are under constant attack in some quarters.

 

In VA, we used to have "an approved umbrella school option." Essentially, one way to "home school" legally was by being enrolled in a state-approved private school. There are some places this may be the *only* way to home school legally. And, there are some people who would like to push for this very thing again. There are many people who walk around thinking, "that could never happen here," and then are shocked to discover legislation being considered that would do just that (I don't have any specific example, this is a "could" not an "is" example).

 

Does this make sense?

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I would like to thank the OP for reminding everyone fortunate enough to live in a place where homeschooling is fairly unencumbered that it was not always that way, nor is it currently that way in every location.

 

When I lived in the US, I had no issue at all with filing my course of study at the beginning of the year and student assessment at the end. HSing was legal, clearly and fairly regulated, and well-accepted. I was not interested in supporting HSLDA and had no need for their services.

 

Where we are currently living, the climate is exactly as the OP described back in the 80s. Most Hsers are under the radar, living in constant fear of being reported to youth protection and having their children forced into school. While Hsing is technically "legal", the gov't makes the hoops such that very few Hsers on the books would be allowed to continue for long.

 

HSLDA, no matter what my personal views may be of their political leaning or actions, is the lifeline for homeschoolers here. They step in when Hsers are reported to youth protection, when they are in power struggles with the school board, as well as in basic everyday situations where proof of residency of a child, for example, is required, which cannot be proven without school registration. They have also fought court cases recently, a severely steep uphill battle, hoping to set a precedent for Hsers' rights. They may not be able to right every injustice, but they try their hardest, and without HSLDA membership, Hsers in my area are up a creek without a paddle.

 

While I certainly understand those who choose not to support HSLDA for a variety of reasons, please count your blessings that you are in a situation where you do not need the type of legal assistance they provide. There are those of us who still have a long way to go to secure the same Hsing rights many of you take for granted.

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Well, I don't know the history of homeschooling. It never occurred to me that it was a part of homeschooling. I think it's important to understand the laws of the home state but I'm surprised to hear someone say they are in "total shock" over someone who doesn't know the history of homeschooling. Obviously it's great that people did what they did, but I don't feel a need to pay tribute to them. I find that such a strange idea.

 

 

Pay tribute??? NEVER! That is an absurd statement!

 

So many take for granted lots about history we don't know... we learn from our history... Homeschooling didn't just come about... school choice like didn't just come about...many mother (mostly fathers too) had to swallow fear, pride, social standing or reputation in church, friends, and many other things just to walk in a public school office building to turn in proof of their children's school work. Today in my state, the homeschool monitor spend 20 minutes with us 1-2 times a year. Totally different!

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Op, if you're so grateful and supportive of the HSLDA, perhaps you should email them and suggest that they curtail their support of specific political agendas that have absolutely nothing to do with hsing so that more hsers feel comfortable supporting their organization.

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Each state is different, just like today. I thank God we aren't in PA...lol. Virginia (imo) has just about the right mix of accountability and freedom, but I will admit that having a bit more freedom is always nice ;). There is also the religious exemption (which I can't in good conscience use, I feel called to direct the education of my children, but not necessarily that homeschooling is the only option I could live with due to my faith).

 

I have always felt that having a "Tebow" option would be a great opportunity for homeschoolers. Giving up band and speech/debate was the most difficult thing for me when I chose to come home. In the end, I went with the freedom to learn vs. being held back as more important than my love for those activities. If I can make it so for my children, they will be able to have both the freedom to learn and the freedom to participate in extra-curricular activities they may be qualified for (which right now would be limited to things like chess club, speech/debate, and swimming).

 

I also fight for more parental school choices...period... without fear of the government using things like public-school-at-home options as justification to "do away" with homeschooling. I have seen this battle up close and personal, and it is filled with unbelievable amounts of hyperbolic twaddle, and no basis in reality. Because the reality is, the families who leave this option (and do so in very high numbers), usually leave for one of two reasons: (a) they weren't fit to homeschool in the first place, it's just too hard, kids go back to b&m school or (b) they get their feet wet, explore other things about homeschooling and leave to homeschool completely on their own with a lot more freedom. I have met more "b's" than "a's." But, I'm sure public school teachers have met more "a's" than "b's"...lol.

 

I'm glad for the freedoms and the choices we have now. I can't be the only one out there who remembers when BJU and Abeka would not sell to home schoolers. I can't be the only one whose pastor preached vehemently against homeschooling (as I sat in the pews), or heard the same refrain in college. I can't be the only one who remembers going to the "Dump" (not in the trash sense) to get a hold of textbooks no longer "suitable" for the local schools. I am so grateful for the options my children have, and for those who fought before me. And like them, I will continue to this fight.

 

 

No you are not the only one who remembers! That was the point of this thread, not pay homage to other who plowed the path, or give to HSLDA. Apparently from this thread's responses you and I are in the minority about that though. That was the whole point of posting this knowing that tomatoes would get thrown.

 

The Public School at Home option scares the H E double hockey stick out of me....because I now that no matter what the education system would LOVE to get their hands on our choices and make it the only legal path.

 

As for debate club, and band. I totally know what you mean, because I always wanted to participate and didn't get to... but like you have so many other great experiences that make it ok. We didn't have many Coops or tutorial programs when I was growing up, nor did we hide though.

 

I am SO grateful to find awesome groups where my child will be able to participate in Drama on an actual stage (who is doing Shakespeare this year), and he will have the chance to play soccer on a team this year. Those were done very grass roots... I never was un-socialized but I also never identified with being much of a student in a school group. I do think there is a good balance to be achieve for children with their peers. I attend church but growing up the "youth group" which was the next closest peer group was so terrible to me (and my siblings) I want my children to have a balance of peer groups... and one is as a student too.

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I've read all those negative comments, and I will continue to support HSLDA with all my heart. Most of them are half truths, or twisted "truth," written by people who were opposed to HSLDA from the beginning and were looking for information to support their own views. I say "most" of them just in case there's a grain of truth in one or two.

 

And that's all I have to say on the issue. Arguing with HSLDA detractors is like getting in the pigpen to wrestle the pig: the pig likes it and you get dirty.

 

I know the feeling. I feel the same way about those who blindly follow HSLDA and its political agenda.

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In VA, we used to have "an approved umbrella school option." Essentially, one way to "home school" legally was by being enrolled in a state-approved private school. There are some places this may be the *only* way to home school legally. And, there are some people who would like to push for this very thing again. There are many people who walk around thinking, "that could never happen here," and then are shocked to discover legislation being considered that would do just that (I don't have any specific example, this is a "could" not an "is" example).

 

 

Alabama comes to mind. One has to be a member of a "church school" to homeschool legally. That or have a state certified private tutor.

 

HSLDA won't go in and fight for the rights of secular parents or non-Christian yet religious parents. They are a Christian organization and like the church school idea very well.

 

So in no way can one homeschool in Alabama without cost. On must pay to join a church school or one must pay a private tutor.

 

I think it is a crock.

 

ETA: For the record we are members of HSLDA. For us they are a necessary evil.

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I would like to thank the OP for reminding everyone fortunate enough to live in a place where homeschooling is fairly unencumbered that it was not always that way, nor is it currently that way in every location.

 

When I lived in the US, I had no issue at all with filing my course of study at the beginning of the year and student assessment at the end. HSing was legal, clearly and fairly regulated, and well-accepted. I was not interested in supporting HSLDA and had no need for their services.

 

Where we are currently living, the climate is exactly as the OP described back in the 80s. Most Hsers are under the radar, living in constant fear of being reported to youth protection and having their children forced into school. While Hsing is technically "legal", the gov't makes the hoops such that very few Hsers on the books would be allowed to continue for long.

 

HSLDA, no matter what my personal views may be of their political leaning or actions, is the lifeline for homeschoolers here. They step in when Hsers are reported to youth protection, when they are in power struggles with the school board, as well as in basic everyday situations where proof of residency of a child, for example, is required, which cannot be proven without school registration. They have also fought court cases recently, a severely steep uphill battle, hoping to set a precedent for Hsers' rights. They may not be able to right every injustice, but they try their hardest, and without HSLDA membership, Hsers in my area are up a creek without a paddle.

 

While I certainly understand those who choose not to support HSLDA for a variety of reasons, please count your blessings that you are in a situation where you do not need the type of legal assistance they provide. There are those of us who still have a long way to go to secure the same Hsing rights many of you take for granted.

 

I am so sorry you are living this now... and yes to all of the above. My mother didn't want to hide, but in some ways we just did. Our every day life was in fear of what would be said, done, or reported about us. It is the one thing I am most grateful for today...an awesome place that will not give my husband and I a difficult time over our schooling choices

 

 

WHILE WAY BETTER TODAY THAN 1985...For those who don't think there is an anti-hs threads in our society is wrong... it is just the anti-charter school type stuff is louder. I could care less about people who question my decisions actually. I know children can grow up great in homeschool. I think it might depend on where you live as to how much anti-homeschool you will find. I live in a pretty liberal affluent (neither of which I am LOL) but people are pretty disapproving...and little children more than moms pick up on that stuff.

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I've read all those negative comments, and I will continue to support HSLDA with all my heart. Most of them are half truths, or twisted "truth," written by people who were opposed to HSLDA from the beginning and were looking for information to support their own views. I say "most" of them just in case there's a grain of truth in one or two.

 

And that's all I have to say on the issue. Arguing with HSLDA detractors is like getting in the pigpen to wrestle the pig: the pig likes it and you get dirty.

 

I agree with Elle... I have never 'paid' to be with HSLDA, but I certainly have used their amazing resources out there for homeschooling families...I knew if I ever ran into a legal issue and someone came down on me, they would regret it...I don't handle bullying lightly.

 

I think there is a swell of discontent harboring in our consciences lately. (Large aside here) Through my 30 years (I'm 44) of paying attention to the news/journalists/media..I have seen an enormous degradation of accurate journalism...everyone has a side and they're touting it. Walter Cronkite reported the news, he may have been a bit biased, but it never showed through...we never had to 'argue' with detractors...but today there are sooo many detractors on so many issues..that I believe we are becoming a contentious society. The medium of forums/facebook etc. make it easy to put out our opinions feeling a level of protection...if, we had to say the things we say out loud on forums, in articles to the general population...we would self censor 80% of it! Without this censorship I believe we are headed for a mess...I believe the upcoming election will be one of the most vicious (among candidates, but even more so among their supporters)....the same goes for 'discussions' or detractors...If you do not present the 'other' side...many skewed ideas will remain..it's a catch 22.

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If you life in the US, you celebrate all sorts of holidays that pay tribute to historical events - the founding of our country (4th of July), those who fought for our country (Memorial Day), the founding fathers (President's Day), etc.

 

Ah, I don't do anything special on those holidays. I've always been puzzled over federal holidays. They are worthy events to remember but I think a yearly tribute is just strange, especially when other people/events are not celebrated. We (my family) certainly know the circumstances of the historical events but revisiting them each year just seems weird. I see them as days off school or work. I guess I'm in the minority of Americans who feel that way. :confused:

 

And unless I'm wrong, the term 'paying tribute' refers to recognizing some person or event that is worthy of respect and acknowlegement. Isn't that what a special day specifically set aside for a federal holiday is designed to do? Doesn't the very act of making the day a holiday mean people should stop and think about the person/event and say 'wow, what a great thing' Let's thank them."? I'm not saying it's a bad thing, but that it's strange that we are selective in who we choose to remember.

 

HSLDA has some beliefs and practices I do not agree with, so I cannot support them.

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While I believe really strongly in the right to homeschool, some of the side distracting issues that HSLDA has supported are things that I'm possibly even more adamantly against (or for that they're against, or whatever) than I am for homeschooling. I don't mind strange bedfellows, but I'm not going to support a group with whom I actually disagree on a number of things.

 

:iagree:

 

I'd also ask -- so how long do we need to continue to not say anything bad about the HSLDA before we've 'paid our debt' of gratitude for helping establish things in the early days? How many years before it's okay to say 'well, they did do some good things, but I strongly disagree with what they're doing now'?

 

And frankly, it's quite insulting to imply that anyone who disagrees with them is merely blindly following an agenda put out by an anti-homeschool group, rather than having done their research and disagreeing with them due to (for my own personal example) statements on their own website.

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Op, if you're so grateful and supportive of the HSLDA, perhaps you should email them and suggest that they curtail their support of specific political agendas that have absolutely nothing to do with hsing so that more hsers feel comfortable supporting their organization.

:iagree:

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I don't think the OP is looing for people to "pay tribute" to the ones who have gone before, but more a general understanding/awareness that things weren't as "easy" as they are now, and we should be grateful for those who helped make it so. By being aware, we may also become more diligent to continue fighting for those freedoms, because they are under constant attack in some quarters.

 

Ah, I reread the OP and I'm just interpreting it differently. It wouldn't be the first time I've been mistaken. :tongue_smilie:

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I started homeschooling in the late 80s. I do know how hard it was, and I was in Michigan at the time, which was a very hard state to homeschool in. Basically, you had to do it under the radar, which I did.

 

But, I still didn't use HSLDA. I couldn't afford it and didn't see the need for it. The battles that were fought at the time, were done without the help of HSLDA in Michigan (that I recall). I know a lot of people used Clonlara, and that the Moores were in the courtrooms a LOT.

 

Our support group/co-op did not meet in a basement. They had classes at a local church, and we went on a lot of school-day field trips, so we didn't 'hide'. If we were asked about why the kids were not at school, we told people that they attended a private school (which they did; our private homeschool) and we were all encouraged to have a name for our school so the kids could say, "We attend Blank Academy" when asked where they went to school.

 

We used Sing, Spell, Read and Write because they would sell to individuals, and we used cast-off school textbooks and the library. Eventually, A Beka would sell to us, but we had to get together and order a lot at one time at the co-op. I, however, never liked A Beka texts so never used them. I did like the BJU texts, and a local Christian school that bought BJU materials would sell their old/used texts to the local homeschoolers. That was really nice. And there were materials written by homeschoolers for homeschoolers, even back then. When my kids were a few years older, I know we used and loved Learning Language Arts Through Literature (the old versions), and The Weaver unit study (we even called and talked to the lady that had written it and was selling it!).

 

I loved when we moved to Oklahoma and the right to homeschool was written into their state constitution. I felt like we could breath again!

 

What a fun look back in time! But, yes, the threat of being arrested in Michigan was always there in the background. Knowing history is important. I guess because I lived through it, it simply never occurred to me that so many of the new, younger homeschoolers didn't know or care what it was like in the beginning. Interesting.

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ladies the thing is, you can hate HSLDA or not hate it... it was only background so the post wouldn't feel so "out of the blue" which apparently it did anyway to some...

 

It was more of a reality check of where we are today.

 

If we don't know the past, we will not appreciate the freedoms we have. That could on many topics of our history. On the WTM forums where history is such a big part of educating our children I (incorrectly) assumed and was baffled as to why to people don't know what homeschooling was like, because you know what?! IN A MATTER OF A FEW YEARS it could easily go back to that... if we don't know, if we take for granted, if we don't care...yeah it could (that is not tin-foil-hat speculation).

 

I just know what it is like to live this, so many moms and students I am around don't, and the posts here amaze me.

 

On the day we forget who Hitler was another atrocity will occur, on the day we forget who Martin Luther was injustices will occur again, it is the same thing on a much smaller scale.

 

Oh and about holidays, the families who lost loved ones, or have veterans over seas etc certainly DO make sure they recognize those holidays, they are sacred to the memories of their loved ones...just like Christians observe Christmas and Easter or Jewish people observe their sacred holidays.

 

Paying homage to HSLDA or my mother or anyone else is not the point. Knowing what it was like, and what it could be again someday if we do not pay attention, teach our children etc.

 

 

ps. as a relative newbie here, I have totally learned my lesson on posting things of this nature ever again...glad it only took one thread... took me a lot longer with mommy drama with which I have no time for now either. :lol:

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I guess this is the finger-wagging lecture for the day. Hm. Ok, I consider myself duly chastised. :D

 

Now how long til this thread gets locked?

 

I wouldn't think very much longer now. :D

 

And as to a pp about homeschoooing in Michigan, well, I don't know what it was like 'back then', but right now, it's as easy as can be. No reproting to the state, no nothin'.

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I started homeschooling in the late 80s. I do know how hard it was, and I was in Michigan at the time, which was a very hard state to homeschool in. Basically, you had to do it under the radar, which I did.

 

But, I still didn't use HSLDA. I couldn't afford it and didn't see the need for it. The battles that were fought at the time, were done without the help of HSLDA in Michigan (that I recall). I know a lot of people used Clonlara, and that the Moores were in the courtrooms a LOT.

 

Our support group/co-op did not meet in a basement. They had classes at a local church, and we went on a lot of school-day field trips, so we didn't 'hide'. If we were asked about why the kids were not at school, we told people that they attended a private school (which they did; our private homeschool) and we were all encouraged to have a name for our school so the kids could say, "We attend Blank Academy" when asked where they went to school.

 

We used Sing, Spell, Read and Write because they would sell to individuals, and we used cast-off school textbooks and the library. Eventually, A Beka would sell to us, but we had to get together and order a lot at one time at the co-op. I, however, never liked A Beka texts so never used them. I did like the BJU texts, and a local Christian school that bought BJU materials would sell their old/used texts to the local homeschoolers. That was really nice. And there were materials written by homeschoolers for homeschoolers, even back then. When my kids were a few years older, I know we used and loved Learning Language Arts Through Literature (the old versions), and The Weaver unit study (we even called and talked to the lady that had written it and was selling it!).

 

I loved when we moved to Oklahoma and the right to homeschool was written into their state constitution. I felt like we could breath again!

 

What a fun look back in time! But, yes, the threat of being arrested in Michigan was always there in the background. Knowing history is important. I guess because I lived through it, it simply never occurred to me that so many of the new, younger homeschoolers didn't know or care what it was like in the beginning. Interesting.

 

I guess I have been tripping over myself to say yes! The OP was not to say...hate or don't hate HSLDA... to say this is what life was like, and the children and educators today in majority have NO idea what this is like.

 

My husband was offered a job with the choice of several other states...my first fear was "I have decided to homeschool! What will this move mean for my freedom to school my child?? "

Edited by Abeth78
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No I wasn't trying to open a "can of worms" about HSLDA supporters or not. Not at all... I am in total shock how many do not even know the history of homeschooling. Maybe I just lived and schooled in a difficult state.

 

It isn't out of the blue... the discrimination thread active right now, and the PA thread from last week that talked about people having to turn in portfolios and resenting (understandably) the intrusion. I guess I am getting at intrusion was not the fear back then...that was life... today intrusion is about as bad as it gets (Thank goodness).

 

If you look at my thread history, you will see I am not a drama stirrer... at all:001_huh:

 

Where are you getting the idea that we don't know the history of homeschooling? So I wasn't homeschooled. However, I did do a fair bit of studying the subject (from the time my oldest was 3) before we jumped in. Maybe your history is coming from a very narrow lens... One that does not include anything or anyone not associated with HSLDA. In our state, HSLDA did not create our freedoms. They came from grass roots efforts of the people who live in our state who were willing to fight for their freedoms, not from some outside organization swooping in to "save the day." In fact, in instances when HSLDA has come in, there has been some fall out, that took some grass roots effort to mitigate.

 

In other states, they have pushed the local groups out of the way and had "back room meetings" without the constituents of that state and helped write laws that created more hardships.

 

I believe the best way to preserve our freedoms is to be educated about the laws in your state, getting to know the legislators, being informed of legislative proceedings (not just HSLDA alerts) and stand up for your rights. Only in rare cases will an attorney be needed. In many states, HSLDA does not have a practicing attorney, so you may be on your own there as well.

 

I am very thankful to the citizens of my state who stood up to protect the rights of homeschoolers and paved the way for me. I am thankful for those who monitor the workings of our legislature and keep us informed with sensible (not sensational) information and sensible action plans. HSLDA does not deserve all the credit that they try to claim.

 

I think of them as a "do-gooder" type organization that serves only a small segment of the homeschooling population and who does not think about the long term, wide-ranging consequences of their actions.

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I've read all those negative comments, and I will continue to support HSLDA with all my heart. Most of them are half truths, or twisted "truth," written by people who were opposed to HSLDA from the beginning and were looking for information to support their own views. I say "most" of them just in case there's a grain of truth in one or two.

 

And that's all I have to say on the issue. Arguing with HSLDA detractors is like getting in the pigpen to wrestle the pig: the pig likes it and you get dirty.

 

:iagree: --

 

It's kind of like studying history in school. It matters today ONLY in terms of understanding why things are the way they are.

 

You can live without knowing any history and function perfectly fine, but life is so much the richer and you understand things better when you come to humps in the road if you know a little bit of history.

 

If you life in the US, you celebrate all sorts of holidays that pay tribute to historical events - the founding of our country (4th of July), those who fought for our country (Memorial Day), the founding fathers (President's Day), etc.

 

So it isn't quite so shocking as you might think.

 

:iagree:

 

I don't think the OP is looking for people to "pay tribute" to the ones who have gone before, but more a general understanding/awareness that things weren't as "easy" as they are now, and we should be grateful for those who helped make it so. By being aware, we may also become more diligent to continue fighting for those freedoms, because they are under constant attack in some quarters.

 

 

Does this make sense?

 

Yes, that is the way I took it as well. ;)

 

I was glad to have HSLDA when threatened with truancy charges 9 years ago. (My paperwork was in order; copies had been mailed with Delivery Confirmation. I had receipts proving the paperwork was delivered and signed for. Yet, the superintendent had an axe to grind and was proceeding with charges.) *ONE* phone call from HSLDA and everything "magically" turned up.

 

I was also glad to have the support of HSLDA when I was told the local CC wouldn't accept my homeschool transcript and I would have to get it "approved" by the local PS superintendent.

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With 694 members viewing, I don't expect us all to agree, but this was not about HSLDA. My view finder is not as narrow as one might think. That was what started me on the hunt for getting to know our Public education, and private education sectors... and what has me so grateful to know that homeschooling will be so much easier now than it was before.

 

Some of you do get your gander up easy don't you? No need for that really.

 

I am kinda laughing because I didn't know there was homeschooling drama similar to mommy drama until this morning... wow... phaha I am getting educated this morning myself.

Edited by Abeth78
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Where are you getting the idea that we don't know the history of homeschooling? So I wasn't homeschooled. However, I did do a fair bit of studying the subject (from the time my oldest was 3) before we jumped in. Maybe your history is coming from a very narrow lens... One that does not include anything or anyone not associated with HSLDA. In our state, HSLDA did not create our freedoms. They came from grass roots efforts of the people who live in our state who were willing to fight for their freedoms, not from some outside organization swooping in to "save the day." In fact, in instances when HSLDA has come in, there has been some fall out, that took some grass roots effort to mitigate.

 

In other states, they have pushed the local groups out of the way and had "back room meetings" without the constituents of that state and helped write laws that created more hardships.

 

I believe the best way to preserve our freedoms is to be educated about the laws in your state, getting to know the legislators, being informed of legislative proceedings (not just HSLDA alerts) and stand up for your rights. Only in rare cases will an attorney be needed. In many states, HSLDA does not have a practicing attorney, so you may be on your own there as well.

 

I am very thankful to the citizens of my state who stood up to protect the rights of homeschoolers and paved the way for me. I am thankful for those who monitor the workings of our legislature and keep us informed with sensible (not sensational) information and sensible action plans. HSLDA does not deserve all the credit that they try to claim.

 

I think of them as a "do-gooder" type organization that serves only a small segment of the homeschooling population and who does not think about the long term, wide-ranging consequences of their actions.

 

 

:iagree::iagree: We live in different states; yet, the history is the same.

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ladies the thing is, you can hate HSLDA or not hate it... it was only background so the post wouldn't feel so "out of the blue" which apparently it did anyway to some...

 

It was more of a reality check of where we are today.

 

If we don't know the past, we will not appreciate the freedoms we have. That could on many topics of our history. On the WTM forums where history is such a big part of educating our children I (incorrectly) assumed and was baffled as to why to people don't know what homeschooling was like, because you know what?! IN A MATTER OF A FEW YEARS it could easily go back to that... if we don't know, if we take for granted, if we don't care...yeah it could (that is not tin-foil-hat speculation).

 

I just know what it is like to live this, so many moms and students I am around don't, and the posts here amaze me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the day we forget who Hitler was another atrocity will occur, on the day we forget who Martin Luther was injustices will occur again, it is the same thing on a much smaller scale.

 

Oh and about holidays, the families who lost loved ones, or have veterans over seas etc certainly DO make sure they recognize those holidays, they are sacred to the memories of their loved ones...just like Christians observe Christmas and Easter or Jewish people observe their sacred holidays.

 

Paying homage to HSLDA or my mother or anyone else is not the point. Knowing what it was like, and what it could be again someday if we do not pay attention, teach our children etc.

 

 

ps. as a relative newbie here, I have totally learned my lesson on posting things of this nature ever again...glad it only took one thread... took me a lot longer with mommy drama with which I have no time for now either. :lol:

 

:iagree:As one famous President once said,"Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction." As another President said,"A house divided against itself cannot stand." Our freedom could very easily be taken away from us, and our divisiveness will only hasten the event! Many homeschoolers do take for granted the freedom they have, the opportunities their children have, and the ease with which their kids can now go to college without a public school diploma. It WASN'T always that way.

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:iagree:As one famous President once said,"Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction." As another President said,"A house divided against itself cannot stand." Our freedom could very easily be taken away from us, and our divisiveness will only hasten the event! Many homeschoolers do take for granted the freedom they have, the opportunities their children have, and the ease with which their kids can now go to college without a public school diploma. It WASN'T always that way.

 

If the organizations wish to reduce divisiveness, it would help to not get involved in a host of other issues which many believe have little to do with homeschooling.

 

(I'm aware of why they say these issues relate to homeschooling. I just disagree entirely with their reasoning.)

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:iagree:As one famous President once said,"Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction." As another President said,"A house divided against itself cannot stand." Our freedom could very easily be taken away from us, and our divisiveness will only hasten the event! Many homeschoolers do take for granted the freedom they have, the opportunities their children have, and the ease with which their kids can now go to college without a public school diploma. It WASN'T always that way.

 

amen, AMEN! That is all I am sayin'! I almost wasn't able to go to college... well it was a call from HSLDA and a strong mother that made sure it happened but left to my own devices I would not have gone.

 

People one act of the house or congress and it goes back to this... Have a good friend who moved to Germany... she has no choice or rights.

Edited by Abeth78
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QUOTE=kiana;3594692]If the organizations wish to reduce divisiveness, it would help to not get involved in a host of other issues which many believe have little to do with homeschooling.

 

(I'm aware of why they say these issues relate to homeschooling. I just disagree entirely with their reasoning.)

 

:iagree: perhaps they have gotten off track and have gotten involved in these other issues BECAUSE homeschooling is now accepted, and the legal battles are not as frequent. They have to do something to stay in business.

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