Jump to content

Menu

Recommended Posts

It's tattered & torn because I bought it used and then my two older dc used it. Not because it's a relic from the stone age (aka my high school years). :)

 

:lol: :tongue_smilie: :D Haha, Yeah, I think my algebra book was written on stone tablets come to think of it. As such it would be pretty hard to find on ebay.

Edited by dereksurfs
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For our pre-algebra year, we continue on with Singapore and finish Singapore 6A/B.

 

I was wondering about the feasibility of this very idea. I have my eye on Foerster's. Can one jump from SM 6B into this? How necessary is an official pre-alg course after Singapore?

 

:lurk5:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was wondering about the feasibility of this very idea. I have my eye on Foerster's. Can one jump from SM 6B into this? How necessary is an official pre-alg course after Singapore?

 

:lurk5:

 

:bigear:

 

I also wonder about using 6A and B. This would be so much easier-- for ME. :tongue_smilie: I have had my head in the sand, but the reality is I am going to need a plan because we will be there by the fall.

 

I've looked at AoPs pre-a and it isn't my style. At all. So I think my child will need to have the maturity to self-direct more than he currently does if we were to use AOPs. Maybe for later courses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can someone soothe my compulsive brain and let me know the typical math sequence after grade 6.

 

 

There are various ways to do it, but typically, 7th and possibly 8th grade are prealgebra (depending on the school), and 8th or 9th is algebra 1, then there is geometry, algebra 2 or algebra2/trig, precalculus, calculus... I didn't have precalculus. We did algebra 1 in 9th, then geometry in 10th, algebra 2/trig in 11th, and calculus in 12th. But there were different tracks, and many kids took precalculus in 12th, which I think also included trig.

 

Hopefully that somewhat answers your question. Really, there are many ways to do it.

 

The "advanced" math sequence back in the stone age when I went to school was pre-algebra in 7th and algebra I in 8th. However, our school district is currently trying to encourage the advanced kids to take pre-algebra in 6th and algebra I in 7th. I am not exactly sure I what the point of this is (after dh and I have tried to do some research about it), but I think it is worth noting what other kids in the neighborhood (or who are competing for spots in college) may be doing/have done in math.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm considering a MUS Pre-Algebra/Singapore 6a/b approach next year (we are finishing Singapore 5b now) OR a Chalkdust BCM year for 6th grade, CD Pre-Alg 7th....

 

I'm going to summarize all I've read about the Middle - HS Math Courses that are DVD based:

 

Math U See - excellent teaching, light on intuitive thinking and problems outside of the Honors piece, most consider Algebra a pre-Algebra course level, hands-on, children understand the visual element of algebraic formulas

 

Chalk Dust - long video lectures, thick texts, excellent videos and teaching (clear, easy to understand), thorough but somewhat overwhelming, many take longer than a year to get through each level, developed for 18+ year olds (I've reviewed this one). I've noticed that many people seem to drop CD after a while (not sure why)

 

Videotext - white board only videos, DVD employs actors for teaching at some points, non-traditional movement of material, easy problem format (not thick text but plans specific to lectures), been around in schools for a while

 

Discovering Math - short lessons, unusual workbook, not enough problem practice without workbook, no Video but I'm including this bc I now use Singapore (I've reviewed this one), no teaching guide, progression not standard, rigorous

 

Saxon - DIVE CD is white-board only, Art Reed DVD's are well loved and shorter than something like Chalk Dust, people either love or hate the tight spiral during the HS years, "fragmented" material layout

 

Lial's - DVD's floating around somewhere?, easy to teach without DVD's??

 

Dolciani - well loved, straight forward text ??

 

Feedback please?!

Edited by Dassah
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The "advanced" math sequence back in the stone age when I went to school was pre-algebra in 7th and algebra I in 8th. However, our school district is currently trying to encourage the advanced kids to take pre-algebra in 6th and algebra I in 7th. I am not exactly sure I what the point of this is (after dh and I have tried to do some research about it), but I think it is worth noting what other kids in the neighborhood (or who are competing for spots in college) may be doing/have done in math.

 

The point of it is that California and possibly some other states have mandated Algebra 1 in 8th for all students. So if the average students are doing Algebra 1 in 8th, that means the honors track has to push it back to 7th or they lose their advantage in college admissions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The point of it is that California and possibly some other states have mandated Algebra 1 in 8th for all students. So if the average students are doing Algebra 1 in 8th, that means the honors track has to push it back to 7th or they lose their advantage in college admissions.

 

I'm sorry but :001_huh: :tongue_smilie: :banghead: Because ALL kids need to be on a college-prep course and MUST take Advanced Math to function in society? If everyone takes Algebra 1 in 8th, I'm guessing it doesn't count towards graduation? If it does...then why the heck push high-school courses onto middle schoolers?

 

I know here in VA, honors track can take it in 7th. I know some kids who do. More than half need tutors to pass, and then re-take it in 8th. It may count towards graduation. I don't know if Algebra 1 in 8th is actually required, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm considering a MUS Pre-Algebra/Singapore 6a/b approach next year (we are finishing Singapore 5b now) OR a Chalkdust BCM year for 6th grade, CD Pre-Alg 7th....

 

I'm going to summarize all I've read about the Middle - HS Math Courses that are DVD based:

 

Math U See - excellent teaching, light on intuitive thinking and problems outside of the Honors piece, most consider Algebra a pre-Algebra course level, hands-on, children understand the visual element of algebraic formulas

 

Chalk Dust - long video lectures, thick texts, excellent videos and teaching (clear, easy to understand), thorough but somewhat overwhelming, many take longer than a year to get through each level, developed for 18+ year olds (I've reviewed this one). I've noticed that many people seem to drop CD after a while (not sure why)

 

Videotext - white board only videos, DVD employs actors for teaching at some points, non-traditional movement of material, easy problem format (not thick text but plans specific to lectures), been around in schools for a while

 

Discovering Math - short lessons, unusual workbook, not enough problem practice without workbook, no Video but I'm including this bc I now use Singapore (I've reviewed this one), no teaching guide, progression not standard, rigorous

 

Saxon - DIVE CD is white-board only, Art Reed DVD's are well loved and shorter than something like Chalk Dust, people either love or hate the tight spiral during the HS years, "fragmented" material layout

 

Lial's - DVD's floating around somewhere?, easy to teach without DVD's??

 

Dolciani - well loved, straight forward text ??

 

Feedback please?!

 

We purchased Lial's Pre-A workbook, solution manual and DVDs written for the book. I would not recommend the DVDs as they seemed really boring. I'll most likely sell them. We don't really like the text layout and found it too visually busy/distracting, though some seem to like it.

 

Also consider KineticBooks Algebra which has a number of good reviews. Some prefer it over VideoText. Most reviews seem positive.

 

For VideoText I've found very mixed reviews with a lot of it which goes back up for sale on the boards here.

 

ChalkDust also has mixed reviews with lectures sometimes referred to as long winded. Some kids seem to hate it.

 

MUS we are currently using, just started Pre-A. Its very straight forward with good DVD instruction. Text is non-clustered. The instructor is good at breaking down complex subjects, making them easier to understand. Lectures are short and to the point. It has honors Qs as you mentioned. Easy to accelerate and/or suppliment with other materials.

 

CLE now has Algebra and Geometry. This curriclum is generally highly regarded. However not much is available in terms of reviews yet since these are newer releases from them.

 

Derek Owens online classes also rate highly and are considered on the rigorous side.

 

As with all programs/curriculum fit varies with each child.

Edited by dereksurfs
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Coming in late, but we didn't do Pre-Algebra. Instead, we did Algebra twice: Foerster's and then VTI.

 

I also have the whole Lial's series and about four Dolciani's, and the first few AOPS books,and a bunch of extra problem books. :lol: I figure I can save them all and use them to supplement whatever lousy text I'm required to use when I eventually teach public school math.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can someone soothe my compulsive brain and let me know the typical math sequence after grade 6.

 

From k-gr11 math was fully integrated for me so I don't know the order math is supposed to go. My plan is to ride the Singapore DM train until it derails in a fiery crash. Also I have the Dolciani text (1985) and I am really enjoying going through the problems as a refresher.

 

Most of the local schools here have college prep as Pre-algebra in 7th, Alg in 8th, Geom in 9th, Alg II in 10th, Pre-Calc/Trig in 11th, and Calc in 12th. Advanced students (just a handful) do Algebra in 7th. They will do AP Calc and/or dual enrollment. Non-college prep pushes Algebra back to 9th grade and ends with Trig or Alg II and an elective math course (Alg I, Alg II, Geom, and 1 additional math course are required to graduate.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmm. didn't include the two I'm planning to use next year: Kinetic Books for Algebra and Thinkwell for 7th grade math.

 

I did and I'm thinking about KineticBooks as well. I checked out some Thinkwell video samples and geesh does that instructor's presentation bug me. Maybe kids would like it though, kinda like Bill Nye the Science guy. :tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did and I'm thinking about KineticBooks as well. I checked out some Thinkwell video samples and geesh does that instructor's presentation bug me. Maybe kids would like it though, kinda like Bill Nye the Science guy. :tongue_smilie:

 

We tried Thinkwell's Pre-Alg over a year ago and decided that as much as we love Ed Burger's Teaching Company lectures, the Thinkwell format does not do him full justice. It works very well for some kids though.

 

For a more Bill Nye version of math, try James Grime aka the Singing Banana. He's cute, funny and very passionate about math. This is not for grade-level math progression but is a wonderful introduction to problem solving.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've been using MM and dd10 is on 5B right now. Can anyone tell me if they used MM through level 6B and still felt like they needed a pre-algebra program? I may have missed this thread. I know quite a few people jumped from MM5B into AoPS Pre-Algebra and I am still trying to figure out how AoPS is similar or different to MM6A & B. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've been using MM and dd10 is on 5B right now. Can anyone tell me if they used MM through level 6B and still felt like they needed a pre-algebra program? I may have missed this thread. I know quite a few people jumped from MM5B into AoPS Pre-Algebra and I am still trying to figure out how AoPS is similar or different to MM6A & B. Thanks!

 

Interested to hear this too. We are in MM5 and at this moment (subject to change at any minute, of course ;)) I am thinking of continuing with MM6, covering any concepts that are challenging, and doing AoPS Pre-A simultaneously.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, that is what I am also considering. I just wondered would going through the entire MM Level 6 and THEN AoPS be redundant, or do they need to be worked side by side if you are going to use them both? Do you need to use them both?

 

I am not sure of the answer. I do know that I've bought Lial's Pre-A and Dolciani, but right now, DS is doing very well with MM (and _I_ really like it) but is also eager to do AoPS ("exciting math")...I am reluctant to give up MM this summer (he'll be finished with MM5 by then) but I know he wants more challenge. Hence, simultaneous combination of both. We'll see if it works.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, that is what I am also considering. I just wondered would going through the entire MM Level 6 and THEN AoPS be redundant, or do they need to be worked side by side if you are going to use them both? Do you need to use them both?

Whether to do all of MM6 and then AoPS Prealgebra depends on the kid. Certainly, AoPS would not be redundant, though there may be portions of topics that would be review, e.g., toward the beginning of a chapter. However, AoPS takes everything deeper and kicks up the difficulty a notch (or more, if you do the challenge problems), and the presentation is so different. It offers a whole new perspective on approaching math problems - it's delightful, honestly.

 

There are also entire topics in AoPS Prealgebra that are not in MM6, such as square roots and the Pythagorean Theorem, which I understand were intentionally not included in MM6. Exponents are another example - MM introduces exponents, but AoPS is miles deeper, and right off the bat (ch 2). (FWIW, it's miles deeper on exponents than other prealgebras as well).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After thoroughly reviewing all of the Pre-Algebra and Algebra math books I could get my hands on (including Dolciani, DM 1:confused:, Saxon 8/7 :tongue_smilie: and the ChalkDust/Larson Pre-Algebra text :001_huh: & DVD's :) ), I feel that I am most comfortable moving forward with a Math U See/Life of Fred Combo. I've read that it is often-times most important as homeschoolers to select the text that YOU feel comfortable teaching from...I'm moving forward with this theory in mind. :001_smile: I believe Saxon would be the only text I'd have trouble jumping into after Algebra should I change my mind and I can't-see-that-happening after reviewing the maze that it was.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a heads up. Got Dolciani Elementary Algebra Part 1 through library loan today, and strangely, it looks more basic than Dolciani Pre-A :confused: Has anyone used this text?

 

ETA: Ugh. Now I'm looking at Dolciani Pre-Algebra, An Accelerated Course again.:smash: I swear, I will NEVER. MAKE. A. DECISION.

Edited by Halcyon
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a heads up. Got Dolciani Elementary Algebra Part 1 through library loan today, and strangely, it looks more basic than Dolciani Pre-A :confused: Has anyone used this text?

 

ETA: Ugh. Now I'm looking at Dolciani Pre-Algebra, An Accelerated Course again.:smash: I swear, I will NEVER. MAKE. A. DECISION.

 

Oh nooo!!! I think at times chosing curriculum can be more challenging than actually using it. :tongue_smilie: You are like me in that I love to research things which can at times lead to frustration or analysis paralysis if a decision isn't made. Since you have already looked at so many why not just try one or more you like with your son? Then if that doesn't work go back to the drawing board. I think its good to remember there is no perfect curriculum, just some which works better for the child and parent combo than others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a heads up. Got Dolciani Elementary Algebra Part 1 through library loan today, and strangely, it looks more basic than Dolciani Pre-A :confused: Has anyone used this text?

 

ETA: Ugh. Now I'm looking at Dolciani Pre-Algebra, An Accelerated Course again.:smash: I swear, I will NEVER. MAKE. A. DECISION.

 

As much of a Fred fan as everyone knows I am, I got a great copy of the Dolciani PreA Accelerated for about fifty cents (who could pass that up?) and read through it. I'd have to say it would be hard to go wrong using that book.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As much of a Fred fan as everyone knows I am, I got a great copy of the Dolciani PreA Accelerated for about fifty cents (who could pass that up?) and read through it. I'd have to say it would be hard to go wrong using that book.

I hear you! Why then, do I feel so compelled to use AoPS? Is it because it's supposed to be "the hardest" or "the most rigorous"? There are definitely parts of it I really, really like. But at this point I know it won't be our main curriculum. Maybe a Dolciani AoPS combo. And Derek, you're right-I should just stop researching and try it out with him. The only issue with that is that he's very compliant (in that he'll work with whatever is put in front of him), so I need to be sure from where I sit it's the best choice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hear you! Why then, do I feel so compelled to use AoPS? Is it because it's supposed to be "the hardest" or "the most rigorous"? There are definitely parts of it I really, really like. But at this point I know it won't be our main curriculum. Maybe a Dolciani AoPS combo. And Derek, you're right-I should just stop researching and try it out with him. The only issue with that is that he's very compliant (in that he'll work with whatever is put in front of him), so I need to be sure from where I sit it's the best choice.

 

I can totally relate to this. My ds is the same way - eager to do math and to please. What more could a teacher ask for from a young student? That's also why I have looked at so many offerings for both Pre-A and Algebra. I've come to the conclusion that there are at least several good curricula paths I could take with him which he would do well with. I've also concluded that AoPS will not be a good primary currilcum for him based on his learning style. Those discoveries helped narrow the field for me and come to a decision. The fact that there are other good choices makes it nice in case something selected just doesn't work for whatever reason.

Edited by dereksurfs
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can totally relate to this. My ds is the same way - eager to do math and to please. What more could a teacher ask for from a young student? That's also why I have looked at so many offerings for both Pre-A and Algebra. I've come to the conclusion that there are at least several good curricula paths I could take with him and which he would do well with. I've also concluded that AoPS will not be a good primary currilcum for him based on his learning style. Those discoveries helped narrow the field for me and come to a decision. The fact that there are other good choices makes it nice in case something selected just doesn't work for whatever reason.

 

Glad to know I"m not the only one with a compliant math student. My gut tells me that to rely on AoPS as our primary math curriculum would be wrong. He likes straightforward with a small amount of challenge math thrown in for fun. He doesn't like every question to hurt his brain, but he likes that once in a while.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Glad to know I"m not the only one with a compliant math student. My gut tells me that to rely on AoPS as our primary math curriculum would be wrong. He likes straightforward with a small amount of challenge math thrown in for fun. He doesn't like every question to hurt his brain, but he likes that once in a while.

 

I say go with your gut after reviewing the various options. You know what will work best for your son. The fact that you are a bit torn right now speaks to your desire for his best. I'm sure you'll find something which works well for the both of you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm with Derek. Go with your gut. I'm not against AoPS, and it has its good points, but it is also a bit of "the flavor of the month" around the boards. Mathematically speaking, it is not particularly better than the other good curricula out there.

 

Think of it this way: even the weakest curriculum out there, done well, will outperform the 'best' curriculum in existence, if the "better" choice is either poorly implemented or poorly matched to your child. If AoPS is not speaking to you, you don't owe anybody an explanation (including yor child's future) for not using it. If it isn't the best for him, then it isn't the best choice. Use what speaks to you, with confidence and a clear conscience, unless there is a specific objective reason not to do so (ie, he clearly fails to retain the information or cannot apply it).

 

Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone. I am going to my very best to listen to my gut! Lial's, Dolciani Pre-A and AoPS are ALL solid choices--I know this. My son works very, very hard in all his classes and eagerly tackles whatever I throw at him, but that doesn't give me license to pile on with something, that for him, may not be right for him at this juncture. I am also going to try and play close attention to the messages inside of me indicating that this may not be the right curriculum for ME to use WITH him. He really, really likes to do his math independently, and I know he can't do that with AoPS at his age. He would need a fair amount of whiteboard work and instruction, and as the primary curriculum, that won't work.

 

Don't get me wrong-we'll probably still keep AoPS in the mix. But right now, I'm leaning towards it serving a secondary, supportive role.

 

Thanks all. :001_smile:

Edited by Halcyon
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As much of a Fred fan as everyone knows I am, I got a great copy of the Dolciani PreA Accelerated for about fifty cents (who could pass that up?) and read through it. I'd have to say it would be hard to go wrong using that book.

 

Could I ask what the ISBN is, please? I see several different editions. Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For Dolciani Accelerated PreA 1985:

 

0395359872

 

Currently pretty cheap used on Amazon. My copy arrived in excellent condition.

 

That's the one i have. The more I look at it, the more I like it.

 

Thank you both! My ds is approaching pre-algebra and I think I need to bone up on my skills. :001_huh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have ISBN 039543050X, 1988 edition, hardcover, and I have to say that I really like this book. I had DD use Lial's and Dolciani's, but I prefer the simplicity and layout of Dolciani.

 

I think I've decided too that that's the one we'll use, along with AoPS for extra challenge. DS is almost done with MM5B, so i need to decide whether to complete year 6 or not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for this great thread! I have one stupid question: Is there an instructor's guide/solutions manual to Dolciani's pre-algebra?

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks,

Rene

 

 

 

 

The TM is hard to get. I bought one a while back when it was more available. However, the answers to the odd problems are in the back of the student text, so I don't think the TM is necessary (there are lots of problems, so assigning odds is usually more than sufficient ;))

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The TM is hard to get. I bought one a while back when it was more available. However, the answers to the odd problems are in the back of the student text, so I don't think the TM is necessary (there are lots of problems, so assigning odds is usually more than sufficient ;))

 

:iagree::iagree:

 

I think I've decided on a MM, Dolciani, AoPS mix :D How's that for indecision!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
Dd does a TT Alg 1 lesson in about 40 minutes. She loves it. I have said before I can't imagine a more delightful way of teaching this content to a youngster. Have you seen the online sample?

 

I am correcting myself now. MUS is the best alg for a youngster. Thank you, 8, for unknowingly prompting me to take a look at MUS alg 1 (honors). I am adding tougher word problems to the mix from AoPS. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...
:lol:

 

I was just thinking about Pre-Algebra while taking a shower today - whether to go all the way through MM6, or start something else instead, or at the same time . . . This thread didn't help make up my mind AT ALL!! :glare:;)

 

Please keep in mind this thread was for staddlers, who I was also a part of at one time.:tongue_smilie:

 

Bottom line: You won't find a definative answer to your question as we all have different things that end up working best for us. AoPS, MUS, Lials, Derek Owens, Horizons, TabletClass, KineticBooks, Chalkdust, Saxon, et al have their fans as well as others who these do not work for. Many including us had to buy and demo several products first before finding a best fit for our unique dc.

 

I recommend demo'ing, buying one or more you think might work. And then take a good look at them. If possible have your dc try these out. If you have a homeschool co-op, friends, or a library with some them that is a way to take a look without buying. Some web based programs have free demos such as KineticBooks, Derek Owens, TabletClass. Don't forget resale value is pretty good for these products. So if you don't like some you can sell them again. I still have Lials lying around. But we sold our old MUS stuff.

 

Don't be too shocked if the one you had your mind set on initially isn't the one which ends up working best for you. That's not to say it couldn't happen. Just be open to testing a few things out if things are not working well vs. saying we're doing X program come hell or high water. ;)

Edited by dereksurfs
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Need some advice, peeps!

 

My son is finishing up MM5B, maybe 10 pages left. He has also begun AoPS Pre A and is on the second chapter. He is finding some of the problems to be quite hard. He is not getting frustrated, and is still enjoying the book, but is getting more wrong than he is used to. Should he continue? Right now, I have him redo the next day the ones he gets wrong, and he sometimes gets them right, sometimes not. Some are the challenge questions, which even I find quite hard. Some are the regular questions.

 

Perhaps he should spend some time on alcumus focusing on Higher Exponents before moving on?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Need some advice, peeps!

 

My son is finishing up MM5B, maybe 10 pages left. He has also begun AoPS Pre A and is on the second chapter. He is finding some of the problems to be quite hard. He is not getting frustrated, and is still enjoying the book, but is getting more wrong than he is used to. Should he continue? Right now, I have him redo the next day the ones he gets wrong, and he sometimes gets them right, sometimes not. Some are the challenge questions, which even I find quite hard. Some are the regular questions.

 

Perhaps he should spend some time on alcumus focusing on Higher Exponents before moving on?

I think using Alcumus is a great idea. Also, if you're looking for a little more plain-vanilla drill, you could have him do the chapter review from the Dolciani chapter on exponents, which is considerably easier.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think using Alcumus is a great idea. Also, if you're looking for a little more plain-vanilla drill, you could have him do the chapter review from the Dolciani chapter on exponents, which is considerably easier.

 

FWIW, my ds barely eked his way to the end of chapter 2, and didn't do any of the challenge problems. He just didn't have the mental energy/patience. Then we bumped over to Jacobs for a bit, and have come back to AoPS, and he's in chapter 5 still, which from what I recall with dd is probably the most difficult chapter. He is eking his way through this chapter as well and can't wait to be done with it. It seems hard because it is :) (I think the hardest chapters are 2 and 5). For my ds, the trick is knowing when to give him a break. We often do math in the evening, unfortunately, so sometimes he only gets a few problems done, what with all the whining and laying of the head on the table. Keep in mind that part of the learning philosophy with this book is that harder problems lead to understanding the concepts better.

 

Also fwiw, when dd finished the book and went back to chapter 2 to do some review problems, they seemed so much easier than the first time ;), even challenge problems. I think that was at least in part due to having time for the concepts to gel a bit. For my kids, the "time to gel" seems to work. I'm planning to have ds work in Alcumus from the beginning of the book, but I haven't quite decided when to start that (maybe when he's halfway through the book, as review) and the specifics of how I will assign it (whether it will take the place of an evening of math, or whether it will be an add-on, etc.).

 

This is all awesome advice. Thank you! I have Dolciani (okay, I have all the Pre-A books LOL) so I will definitely open that up to the Higher Exponents section and work through some of those. It's odd, because he does UNDERSTAND the concepts, but when it comes to applying them, the questions are hard enough that he sometimes will make errors that he wouldnt make on a more straightforward question. Drilling with Dolciani is a great idea (I almost went with Dolciani myself-i really like it).

 

Thank you!!! And thanks for relaying your son's experience with chapters 2 and 5! :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, chapter 2 was a toughie! ;) I agree that some extra practice is a good idea.

 

Hang in there-- chapter 3 is better. :)

 

The other day my dd made some snide remark about how she thought I had found a challenging math program, but AoPS is easy! I reminded her about chapter 2. Her smile faded. Then, not thinking this was rebuke enough, I warned her about chapter 5, which I'd heard about here (maybe from wapiti). This was enough to get her to return to her work humbled and slightly unnerved. :tongue_smilie:

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, chapter 2 was a toughie! ;) I agree that some extra practice is a good idea.

 

Hang in there-- chapter 3 is better. :)

 

The other day my dd made some snide remark about how she thought I had found a challenging math program, but AoPS is easy! I reminded her about chapter 2. Her smile faded. Then, not thinking this was rebuke enough, I warned her about chapter 5, which I'd heard about here (maybe from wapiti). This was enough to get her to return to her work humbled and slightly unnerved. :tongue_smilie:

 

 

Nice to hear that this is a challenging chapter=I was worried. I also found my Lials Pre A book on the shelf, which has a lot of exponents. We will review from there as well as the Dolciani. Looking those books over, it really is much more straightforward, and I think my son will appreciate being able to get a few right :tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, chapter 2 was a toughie! ;) I agree that some extra practice is a good idea.

 

Hang in there-- chapter 3 is better. :)

 

The other day my dd made some snide remark about how she thought I had found a challenging math program, but AoPS is easy! I reminded her about chapter 2. Her smile faded. Then, not thinking this was rebuke enough, I warned her about chapter 5, which I'd heard about here (maybe from wapiti). This was enough to get her to return to her work humbled and slightly unnerved. :tongue_smilie:

 

:lol::lol::lol:

 

I would love to be a fly on the wall at your house - it sounds like you guys have fun! And that you give your dd the same kind of grief I give mine! :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...