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"I've been homeschooling since BIRTH!" and other things that make you cringe


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It always seems to come from a mom with really young kids looking to beef up her homeschooling resume. :banghead:

 

 

My kids aren't really all that young, and I have been known to say that.

 

I knew before my first child joined us that I would be homeschooling. Honestly, I think that families who know from the start that they will homeschool have a different mindset about things than families who don't decide to homeschool until their kids are K-aged or later.

 

Tara

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I think the moms of five year olds who claim to have been homeschooling for five years are cute........and I can't wait to see what they say in twenty years or so after spending some time in the trenches. :D

 

Probably that they can't remember how long they've been homeschooling because it feels like eternity. :p

 

I did an anthropology subject at uni called 'Kinship and Marriage.' The same lecturer also ran 'Childhood and Culture' and I was so disappointed not to have time to take that one, I emailed her after I finished my degree, and she sent me a spare reading booklet. "Good parenting" is not a one size fits all, universal law any more than "good education." How hard is it to understand and accept that subcultures exist? Then that languages evolve to suit those subcultures?

 

(Not denying that people can just be obnoxious, I've been accused of the same more than once.)

 

Rosie

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Well I have been home schooling 5 of mine since they were born.

 

I have proof in pictures.

 

There is me nursing while explaining Herodotus.

 

There is the baby laying in the middle of the school table and nibbling on his board books with several/all siblings doing their school work around him.

 

There is the infant/toddler sitting in the middle of the table with crayons and paper while we do an activity or lesson.

 

There is the baby/toddler in the stroller at the historical reenactment event.

 

There is the vid of baby making the a-a-a sound and his 2 year old sister telling him, "that's right you awesome smart boy! A-a-apple!!!" and him giggling like a loon.

 

There is the vid of his 6 year old sister touching each of her fingers to his and saying, "onnnne. You'll be walking then! Twooooo. You'll be running by then! Threeeee. You'll be annoying to everyone, but we will love you anyways! (obviously she has a 3 year old sister.:glare:) ....four.... Five... Six! I am six and it is awesome!"

 

So I guess my homeschooling since birth is not an approved program by your standards?

 

But it's working for us.

 

And we think it's way better than most programs money buys these days.

 

 

 

:iagree: While I only have two children, my daughter has definitely been home schooling since she was born. She has sat right next to her brother since she was born. She loves to learn and if it wasn't for me homeschooling her brother I can't say I'd be able to make that statement. Although, I have never been heard to say those words.

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The only people I know whose children even have a bookcase or even a bookshelf in their bedroom are home schoolers.

 

And I have had people say they need to put their 2-4 year old in preschool so the child can learn their colors and shapes and such. And often the kid is already in daycare.:001_huh:

 

I can't even think of a single child I know that doesn't have a bookcase in their room, or somewhere in the house dedicated to children's books. I live in Geekville (one of many, I'm sure). Our public library is very good and very well-used by a broad segment of the population. It's a books and education oriented town and it would be socially unacceptable to never read to your children.

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I love your sign in your signature...I DEFINITELY survived public school and that IS exactly why I home school.

If only I'd thought of it. :)

 

 

Now where did my quote go? Hmmm ...

 

This was for whomever has the above mentioned signature.. If only I had been home schooling since birth maybe I would know how to correctly insert a quote.. hahahaha

 

I found it!! AprilMay that was from your signature...

Edited by christina NY
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When I started homeschooling, we went to homeschool meetings and asked a million questions and listened. Now the moms with first graders (who are 4 yo) say they've been homeschooling for three years and tell us what to do with our high schoolers because they've done a bunch of internet research. :lol: Yeah, that's a bit of hyperbole, but after a while you have to laugh or your head will explode.

 

If I offer a suggestion about high school, it's because I remember it very clearly and it wasn't that long ago. :001_smile: Plus I was responsible for the education of a teenager while my oldest was still learning how to hold her head up. (We unschooled that.) You never know what kind of life experience someone has. :001_smile:

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If I offer a suggestion about high school, it's because I remember it very clearly and it wasn't that long ago. :001_smile: Plus I was responsible for the education of a teenager while my oldest was still learning how to hold her head up. (We unschooled that.) You never know what kind of life experience someone has. :001_smile:

 

Good point.

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If I offer a suggestion about high school, it's because I remember it very clearly and it wasn't that long ago. :001_smile: Plus I was responsible for the education of a teenager while my oldest was still learning how to hold her head up. (We unschooled that.) You never know what kind of life experience someone has. :001_smile:

 

:iagree: I offer suggestions about high school and college stuff occasionally. I graduated high school in '01 and left college in '08. I throw ideas out there because I still remember high school pretty clearly.

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Those are great points. Maybe that is why I have heard (more than once) "it's not for everyone" in conversation with local homeschoolers when I was contemplating hs'ing.

 

And yet, no one else is going to discuss it because it's more fun to complain about all the moms of young 'uns and how they should be seen and not heard. :rolleyes:

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You know, a lot of people here are talking about K'ers who can't do XYZ as a sign that the parents failed in early education. My oldest, when she started K, couldn't recognise any letters, count, or write her name. It wasn't that I shielded her from that information. She just took a lot of direct instruction -- marginally against her will -- to impart the information. She didn't pick it up through every day counting or the thousands of ways letters get thrown at small children.

 

My second is three and counts past ten and reads some letters, so I'm pretty sure it's not just that I keep them locked in a box all day.

 

ETA: We have her counting and reading now! Just so you can all sleep at night ;)

Edited by NASDAQ
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Those are great points. Maybe that is why I have heard (more than once) "it's not for everyone" in conversation with local homeschoolers when I was contemplating hs'ing.

 

I guess my perspective is a little different. We abruptly pulled our oldest from ps in November to homeschool. It was certainly something I was not planning on doing at.all. But it was totally necessary, and as it turns out, it has been wonderful for us (for the most part!). I guess I'm still in the honeymoon period. :001_smile:

 

Actually, the honeymoon love can last for quite a long time. I have been homeschooling for eight years, not counting pre-k and, oh, let’s say thirteen years since birth. Yes, I have used the phrase “homeschooling since birth†both here and IRL. :tongue_smilie:

 

I would say my homeschooling and parenting style lands somewhere between hands off and extremely involved, rotating as needed. I believe that kids need time to be kids, and that they have an amazing capacity to learn on their own, thus the relaxed time is needed.

 

I never meant to be uppity about anything while using the phrase “since birthâ€. I just thought it described us well.

 

As a side note, I always tell everyone I meet that anyone has the ability to homeschool, if they just want to.

 

My only regret about homeschooling is socialization (yup, the dreaded word). I wish more homeschoolers were filled with kindness and that they were more accepting. Oh well, sigh, I can dream..

 

This thread has made me cringe and roll my eyes. ;) :lol: But I still support everyone here- both homeschooler and afterschooler alike.:D:D Parenting is a hard enough job; we don’t need to judge each other.

 

Peace and love.

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Actually, the honeymoon love can last for quite a long time. I have been homeschooling for eight years, not counting pre-k and, oh, let’s say thirteen years since birth. Yes, I have used the phrase “homeschooling since birth†both here and IRL. :tongue_smilie:

 

I would say my homeschooling and parenting style lands somewhere between hands off and extremely involved, rotating as needed. I believe that kids need time to be kids, and that they have an amazing capacity to learn on their own, thus the relaxed time is needed.

 

I never meant to be uppity about anything while using the phrase “since birthâ€. I just thought it described us well.

 

As a side note, I always tell everyone I meet that anyone has the ability to homeschool, if they just want to.

 

My only regret about homeschooling is socialization (yup, the dreaded word). I wish more homeschoolers were filled with kindness and that they were more accepting. Oh well, sigh, I can dream..

 

This thread has made me cringe and roll my eyes. ;) :lol: But I still support everyone here- both homeschooler and afterschooler alike.:D:D Parenting is a hard enough job; we don’t need to judge each other.

 

Peace and love.

 

I think you and I are kindred spirits on this issue.

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I don't get offended by it but it does get an eyeroll in my mind because it does come off as pretentious and competitive like most things in motherhood... whose child read the earliest, who breastfed the longest, whose child has never watched a lick of television, only plays with wooden toys, etc.

 

Mommy wars are so boring.

 

:iagree: Except that I think Mommy wars are actually amusing. Sometimes, when I really want a good snicker, I head over to the K-8 curriculum board to see who is asking for reading programs for their 10 month old who is "really advanced and practically begging to learn to read!!"

 

Those crack. me. up.

 

FWIW, I'm pretty sure I've never said "homeschooled since birth," but I have said that "we've always homeschooled," which I think covers everything one might count since birth, or whenever it is that one would count homeschooling as having officially started.

 

In other words... yada yada...

Edited by Audrey
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I think some of you are sadly misinformed about the quality of parenting of the vast majority of Americans if you think that the kinds of things preschool homeschoolers do are just what parents do.

=====snip=====

Mom B was a VERY involved, loving parent, but in her opinion, academics (including reading books apparently) are for school.

=====snip=====

Anyone who takes on the sole responsibility of their child's education in this day and age is homeschooling in my book. I don't really care what other people call it or if they're annoyed by it.

:iagree: I hs and I don't do half of what a lot of those that hs from birth do with their littles. No gym classes, no Kindermusic... However, by locl standards what I do (read, count, color, &tc but without any schedule/formula/plan) is considered above and beyond.

 

We own books, lots and lots of books, and most people think we're strange because of that. They don't understand why we own so many books, what could we possibly be doing with them all?!?

 

I agree with your last statement as well.

 

 

She shrugged and said, "We're just not that into reading."

 

But if you asked her if her child's education was important to her, I'm certain she would have said absolutely. But that owning books doesn't matter.

That is the prevailing attitude here as well. I have friends that just can't understand why their children don't/can't read. When I suggest reading together they point out that the school doesn't send books home :confused: The idea of choosing a book leaves them looking like a deer in headlights. They don't know HOW to choose a book.

I feel the same way. I don't need to prove anything. I know I'm invaluable. ;)

:lol: When people ask what I do anymore I answer, "Nothing." I've stopped explaining or justifying why I don't really work. Now, I just look them in the eye and say, "Nothing." It's so freeing and what's crazy is... I get less carp for answering that way. When I would say I'm a hsing mother of three, or a stay at home mom, or a volunteer (anything besides nothing!) I would get a patronizing response (of course that's important) or an eye roll. Now, they look vaguely confused and move on to another subject. It's amazing.

And yet, no one else is going to discuss it because it's more fun to complain about all the moms of young 'uns and how they should be seen and not heard. :rolleyes:

You don't really count until you've done it longer. Longer than what? Well, longer than the person you're talking to. From what I understand you can pad that resume by saying you've been hsing 'since birth.' :lol:

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I find this interesting. I don't know that I've ever heard this phrase except online and haven't used it as I tend to identify as late to school rather than early. I generally research curriculum more than others locally so I have to watch myself to keep my mouth shut so I don't come off as a jerk. I figure I have to pay my dues and get some experience to get any credence but that doesn't really bother me.

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"I just finished high school, so let me tell you how to homeschool your high schooler!"

 

Um. Yeah. Ok. Sure. ;):svengo::001_rolleyes::auto:

You're right! Someone that was a high schooler in recent memory would have no insight whatsoever into what a high school student thinks or feels, or what sort of problems they might have, or explanations that might help.

 

I mean, you can't really know anything until you've been in charge of it. The drones, well... they're just drones. Only the queen truly knows how to train a drone.

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I admit that I've sometimes offered suggestions on the high school or college boards, especially when someone is asking about a student planning a music degree, but it comes from the fact that, until the end of the Fall semester, I was a part-time college prof and faculty adviser in a university music school, so while I may not know much about homeschooling a high school student, I do know what pitfalls sometimes catch college kids, and, in some cases, what you can do in high school to avoid them.

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"I just finished high school, so let me tell you how to homeschool your high schooler!"

 

Um. Yeah. Ok. Sure. ;):svengo::001_rolleyes::auto:

 

Well, since you already have all the answers, I'm sure you won't be posting any threads where suggestions could pop up. ;)

 

Some of us have been responsible for the overall education of other people. We have tutored the subjects that some parents struggle with. We majored in subjects that parents are asking questions about. We went through the college entrance process in general, although not as homeschoolers, more recently than parents who are just starting high school with their oldest child. And yes, we remember what it was like.

 

I'd list all of my relevant "work" experience in my signature, but I'm not sure if there is enough room to list everything other posters might require before weighing my posts. Or I could just post, and you could take or leave my comments based on their worth. :001_smile:

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>snip<

 

Some of us have been responsible for the overall education of other people. We have tutored the subjects that some parents struggle with. We majored in subjects that parents are asking questions about. We wBent through the college entrance process in general, although not as homeschoolers, more recently than parents who are just starting high school with their oldest child. And yes, we remember what it was like.

 

I'd list all of my relevant "work" experience in my signature, but I'm not sure if there is enough room to list everything other posters might require before weighing my posts. Or I could just post, and you could take or leave my comments based on their worth. :001_smile:

 

:iagree:

 

While I agree that someone who has not yet parented or homeschooled through a phase will not have the same perspective or insight, it doesn't mean thier thoughts are invalid.

 

It is like anything else, keep the good, let go of the rest. If we all could only talk about things we share exactly in common we'd become a very uncommunicative society.

 

And one more time, FTR, I do not think the phrase is in and of itself obnoxious. It is the situation and tone that render it ridiculous.

Edited by BLA5
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And yet, no one else is going to discuss it because it's more fun to complain about all the moms of young 'uns and how they should be seen and not heard. :rolleyes:

 

Somehow I really really doubt that would actually ever happen. ;)

 

Or maybe I'm the only one who doesn't care what others think of my posts. It would just take so much more than someone rolling their eyes at me to get me to shut up. :tongue_smilie:

 

In other words: Not everyone is going to agree with what you say, or possibly even listen, but say it anyway. (We're moms. Isn't that what we do? :lol:)

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I think some of you are sadly misinformed about the quality of parenting of the vast majority of Americans if you think that the kinds of things preschool homeschoolers do are just what parents do.

....

A conversation overheard between two moms in one of our (middle class) playgroups made this painfully obvious. Mom A was asking Mom B if she had any problems from not sending her oldest to PK. Mom B told her that she was behind in some things but that it all evens out by the end of the year, but, she said, there were some things that you should make sure they know. For instance, the teacher gave her a hard time because her daughter didn't know which side of a book was front/back, where to start, etc. Mom B was a VERY involved, loving parent, but in her opinion, academics (including reading books apparently) are for school.

 

The only people I know whose children even have a bookcase or even a bookshelf in their bedroom are home schoolers. And I have had people say they need to put their 2-4 year old in preschool so the child can learn their colors and shapes and such. And often the kid is already in daycare.:001_huh:

 

And it has nothing to do with money either, tho that is often assumed. I actually met one mom that said buying books for her children to own was a waste of money. (It took everything I had not to gasp aloud at her blasphemy.:) )

 

:iagree:I've tutored 5th graders who did not know basic facts, such as:

 

  • The months of the year ("Um... you mean January... April... um, November?")
  • Names of basic body parts (e.g., hip, jaw, wrist) Really? Yes, really.
  • ANY part of speech ("Huh? You mean like that mark-thing?") He meant a comma.
  • How to spell their own middle names
  • How to write in cursive (at all)
  • How to punctuate and capitalize
  • The continents and oceans

I remember mentioning to one student's mother, "You might want to work with him on learning the months of the year, since he doesn't know those."

 

Her response? "Huh! That's what SCHOOLS are for! Why do we pay TAXES? What do they DO with him in SCHOOL all day, that he doesn't know the MONTHS? I pay TAXES, I pay TAXES! The schools should TEACH THIS!" :smash:

 

In her opinion, if the boy didn't know something, it was the fault of the school system. :001_huh: If I were to compare myself to her, then in that sense, I have (truly) been homeschooling since birth.

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Have I been teaching my kids since birth? Sure but that is parenting.

 

:iagree: That is good parenting. It is not the norm everywhere, though.

 

If I had raised my kids where we live now, I would have appeared to be "homeschooling since birth" compared to many mothers. I don't have comprehensive, reliable data, but what my kids and I have seen is appalling. It makes us want to snatch those kids up and raise them in our family.

 

The proof in the pudding is the high school kids, most of whom cannot read at grade level by their sophomore year. The high school's goal is that most will read at grade level by 2016. It's on a sign on the front door of the school that has been there at least since we moved here in 2009.

Edited by RoughCollie
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If I offer a suggestion about high school, it's because I remember it very clearly and it wasn't that long ago. :001_smile: Plus I was responsible for the education of a teenager while my oldest was still learning how to hold her head up. (We unschooled that.) You never know what kind of life experience someone has. :001_smile:

 

I've been in high school, too, and my degree is in secondary ed. It's still a whole different ball of wax than being the sole person responsible for educating a teen out into the world. (Maybe you did that, too, but that is not the norm for parents of young children.) That's beside the point of my previous point, though.

 

If someone has experience in a particular area, it's great to share, and we've had that discussion before here (in which we all begged Rosie not to stop posting on the HS board, iirc. :D) That's different than moms of young ones commandeering discussions about high school to regale us all with the programs they've *looked at* online and how we should use them and how we should relax or be more rigorous with our high schoolers, because they have a first grader who is reading at a high school level. :lol: You don't see that here (I can't remember an instance at least,) and that's why the example in my post was about what I have seen *at homeschool meetings.* We've had high school conversations with real live awesome moms who homeschool several dc successfully into college, but we couldn't get their advice/opinions, because moms of young children kept taking over.

 

My main point was: I rarely meet a homeschool mom of young ones anymore who is "new." They all know exactly what they are doing and have more advice to share than take, right up until the point that they crack. *That* we have seen here on these boards, too. It makes me sad, not like eye rolling.

Edited by angela in ohio
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:iagree: Except that I think Mommy wars are actually amusing. Sometimes, when I really want a good snicker, I head over to the K-8 curriculum board to see who is asking for reading programs for their 10 month old who is "really advanced and practically begging to learn to read!!"

 

Those crack. me. up.

 

FWIW, I'm pretty sure I've never said "homeschooled since birth," but I have said that "we've always homeschooled," which I think covers everything one might count since birth, or whenever it is that one would count homeschooling as having officially started.

 

In other words... yada yada...

 

I am sure there are posts that warrant an eye-roll. I haven't been around here long enough to notice that yet.

 

However, just to play devil's advocate, there truly are kids that need and crave intellectual stimulation. When my eldest was 2, she was extremely close to being enrolled in behavioral therapy, for reasons beyond "normal" 2 year old behavior. I had a light-bulb moment one day, and realized her behavior issues were due to her absolute need of intellectual stimulation. Roll your eyes if you must, but if she is not receiving that stimulation, it is evident in her behavior even from infancy. Exactly why ps was not working for her and we are hs'ing. Again, would never claim to homeschool since birth, but the more books I read to her and the more books she could (literally) surround herself with, the happier she was.

 

Now what annoys me WAY more than those that are eager and enthusiastic about their children's education, are the parents who do not care or make time for investigating what their children are learning. Where I live, I feel like am in the minority and I am sure I was "one of those" parents that annoy teachers when she was in ps because I kept very close tabs on her needs. I hope I would never laugh or roll my eyes at someone who is sincere and proactive about their children's education.

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If I offer a suggestion about high school, it's because I remember it very clearly and it wasn't that long ago. :001_smile: Plus I was responsible for the education of a teenager while my oldest was still learning how to hold her head up. (We unschooled that.) You never know what kind of life experience someone has. :001_smile:

 

:grouphug: I love talking to recent high school grads and college students about what my kids can expect in college. I think being so close to the time you spent in high school gives you a valid point of view.

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I've been homeschooling for about three weeks now, which makes me newer than new I suppose. :) We did afterschool during the Fall which might bring my grand total to about five months if that counts.

 

I would consider homeschooling to start at the time when a child should be enrolled in public kindergarten or beyond, but the parent chooses to teach those skills at home instead. I've never considered myself a homeschooler until now, but we have worked with our kids since birth on many things - I've always considered that to be good parenting. We exposed them to art/music, read books to them, in some cases bought curriculum to help with problem areas and have been actively involved in academics.

 

I'm less worried about how long I've been doing it and more worried about what the future holds in regards to my homeschooling. 1st grade is fun. Next year I'll have a 2nd and 5th grader. Can I do it? Will I have a mental breakdown? Will my 5th grader decide that being home is torture and want to go back? Will I permanently wreck their chances of ever having a career? Will math be the end of me? Will my mother be the end of me? (She's a guidance counselor). Will I ever find a schedule that works well for me? Those things.

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I've been homeschooling for about three weeks now, which makes me newer than new I suppose. :) We did afterschool during the Fall which might bring my grand total to about five months if that counts.

 

I would consider homeschooling to start at the time when a child should be enrolled in public kindergarten or beyond, but the parent chooses to teach those skills at home instead. I've never considered myself a homeschooler until now, but we have worked with our kids since birth on many things - I've always considered that to be good parenting. We exposed them to art/music, read books to them, in some cases bought curriculum to help with problem areas and have been actively involved in academics.

 

I'm less worried about how long I've been doing it and more worried about what the future holds in regards to my homeschooling. 1st grade is fun. Next year I'll have a 2nd and 5th grader. Can I do it? Will I have a mental breakdown? Will my 5th grader decide that being home is torture and want to go back? Will I permanently wreck their chances of ever having a career? Will math be the end of me? Will my mother be the end of me? (She's a guidance counselor). Will I ever find a schedule that works well for me? Those things.

 

I absolutely love you! :hurray::hurray::hurray:

 

5th grade can be hard. :grouphug: I've got one right now. I'm stressing reading, writing and math. I want to make sure that he has a strong background in those before we move on to 6th. (this is my aspergers son and I use Calvert for middle school.).

Yes, you can do and you might have a little breakdown. But that's ok. Even when I paid, professional teacher...it still got hard at times.

 

Mine have never wanted to go to school...except my 16 year old but hat was only because he wanted to meet girls. I think your 5th grader will find himself with a lot of free time so you may want to take the time this summer to cultivate a new hobby. Make sure to keep his extracurriculars at the same level or higher.

 

You'll find that there are lots of ways to maintain your career and not seem like you've been on maternity leave for 15 years. I teach co-op. I volunteer for our neighborhood food drives. I work with Boy Scouts. And I keep up with trends in education and science.

 

And maybe your mother will come around. Plus she can still be a great resource! And if she sees that age can give you practical advise, maybe thra will help her come around sooner. I'm sure you local support grop would love her insight on prepping kids for college...once she gets "send hem to high school" out of her system.

 

As for planning and scheduling....after 11 years of buying every planner, software program, and PDF possible, I have made my own weekly planning sheet that actually works for us. So don't be afraid to just do what works. It doesn't have to be perfect. It just has to be used. ;)

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OTOH, some of the opinions that have been voiced remind me of how I knew everything about raising a child before I had children. ;)

 

Yeah, and some of the comments here have me feeling like none of us are qualified to say anything about anything until we're dead. ;)

 

Now since we are all equally not dead, we might as well all jump into the scrum and enjoy it.

 

Rosie

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Not the ones that I've met. Most of the parents I know have their kids in daycare until dinner, let them spend the evening in front of the tv, and then put them to bed as early as possible. The daycare might do some of that stuff, but then it definitely wouldn't be hsing.

 

I've even met a couple of sahms who had their (only) children in full-time day care so they could "get something done during the day."

 

I think some of you are sadly misinformed about the quality of parenting of the vast majority of Americans if you think that the kinds of things preschool homeschoolers do are just what parents do. Yes, they SHOULD be what parents do, but they're not. But, then, I consider what we do (and will do) to be a part of parenting, not some extra task I'm taking on. It's been labeled homeschooling by the public, so that's the term I must embrace if I expect others to "get" what we do.

 

As others have stated, the norm here is for children to be sent away as soon as preschools take them. It's unfashionable to send your child to "daycare," so that means when the PRESCHOOL label kicks in at age two, over 50% of middle/upper class children here are sent to one. By age four, it's well over 90%. And no, those who choose not to send their child to preschool are not all "homeschooling." A conversation overheard between two moms in one of our (middle class) playgroups made this painfully obvious. Mom A was asking Mom B if she had any problems from not sending her oldest to PK. Mom B told her that she was behind in some things but that it all evens out by the end of the year, but, she said, there were some things that you should make sure they know. For instance, the teacher gave her a hard time because her daughter didn't know which side of a book was front/back, where to start, etc. Mom B was a VERY involved, loving parent, but in her opinion, academics (including reading books apparently) are for school.

 

And what if someone doesn't send their child to PK and instead works with them at home, but then send them to K? Did they homeschool? In my book, yes. The same way that someone who pulled their child in second grade but then sent them back in fourth grade homeschooled. Anyone who takes on the sole responsibility of their child's education in this day and age is homeschooling in my book. I don't really care what other people call it or if they're annoyed by it.

Those who disagree with "since birth" how do you feel about "since 2" or "since 3" or another very young age? Or alternately "since preschool" I guess.

 

Is it just the implied longer-than-thou attitude that's the issue?

 

Actually, no. I taught PS for ten years before having my kiddos and was shocked at how underprepared the kindergarteners were. Many came knowing no shapes, colors, letters, or even what their own named looked like. I too couldn't figure out how this basic information wasn't learned just by living for 5 years (even if they were just placed in front on the TV, some of it should have soaked in), but sadly it wasn't.

My point is, whether it IS what some people do or not in parenting their children (alphabet, tying their shoes, colors, shapes, etc), those things DO fall under the general spectrum of things that a parent teaches. If some parents don't, well, they are dropping the ball. (And yes, I'm well aware that many don't. I know that in my past post I said something along the lines of 'don't most parents...' but I guess I should have worded it differently. We have kids starting pre-k at our PS here who know nothing. No colors, no shapes, nothing.) Just because a parent does those things does NOT mean they are homeschooling! They are being a responsible parent!

I don't care how long people have been homeschooling. :confused: I don't know why it would matter to me. I'm a brand new homeschooler, and I've never felt like that was a bad position to be in. :001_huh: I've also never heard anything negative from anyone who has been 'doing it longer'. Who cares?

FWIW, I was anti homeschooling as a young parent (well, I'm still a young parent ;), but in my earlier years). I thought it was irresponsible, etc. DH argued with a veteran HS mom about how bad it was. We were seriously against it. If we considered all of the above mentioned things 'homeschooling', don't you think we would have shipped our kids off asap? I stumbled into being a SAHM, it wasn't my original choice. But maybe because of how I was raised, I consider all of those things to be just what a good parent would do. (And I know that the kids don't always respond lol...while DS7 soaked up everything, DS6 would laugh when I'd ask him a body part or a color :D )

I guess it is the 'definition' of homeschooling since birth that I don't get. I don't see how it is humanly possible. I did fun things with my kids and they were learning stuff, and they went to pre-k, and they went to PS. Then I ended up homeschooling, of all things! :lol: I never would have considered myself a homeschooler until now, maybe because all the little kid things weren't as 'purposeful' - sitting down, doing math, etc? With DD she is with us all the time, and I'll sit with her and do puzzles and mazes and glue things together - but I still don't consider her homeschooled. She's not even 3. :confused:

The only people I know whose children even have a bookcase or even a bookshelf in their bedroom are home schoolers.

 

And I have had people say they need to put their 2-4 year old in preschool so the child can learn their colors and shapes and such. And often the kid is already in daycare.

:svengo: Again, as someone who didn't ever plan to homeschool my kids, I always had a bookshelf in their room. Perhaps because I always had a bookshelf in mine?

 

I guess I do not see what is wrong with the above?

Well, it seems kind of odd. I mean, it is a 'homeschooling' event - the moms of kids pre school age should go to a MOPS event or something.

Idk, I guess I just consider the two things completely different.

I can see how, from an unschooling perspective, it would all blend, though. Perhaps because we are more regimented and scheduled in the way we do things, I see a clear distinction between what we do now (homeschool) and what we did then (parent).

 

In other words: Not everyone is going to agree with what you say, or possibly even listen, but say it anyway. (We're moms. Isn't that what we do?

 

That's for sure! :lol:

 

ETA: I have never, to my knowledge, heard anyone say they have been homeschooling since birth. Just thought I'd throw that out there. I can't know for sure it would annoy me, I know I wouldn't be offended. I guess I'm just saying that what some are saying is homeschooling, I say is being a good parent. Most likely, IRL, the subject would never even come up.

Edited by PeacefulChaos
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Well, it seems kind of odd. I mean, it is a 'homeschooling' event - the moms of kids pre school age should go to a MOPS event or something.

Idk, I guess I just consider the two things completely different.

I can see how, from an unschooling perspective, it would all blend, though. Perhaps because we are more regimented and scheduled in the way we do things, I see a clear distinction between what we do now (homeschool) and what we did then (parent).

 

 

 

Around here the average age of the kids in Mom's Clubs is 1 to 2 years old and there are no MOPS groups. By 3 the vast majority of kids are in some form of out of the house school. I belonged to Mom's Club from shortly after my youngest was born until I dropped it when she was 3 after a year of never finding anything to do because there were absolutely no activities with kids her age and my son was always the oldest there by years. I was worried about not being welcome in homeschool groups with only two "preschool" age children so waited until he was 5 to start joining homeschool groups, although we started kindergarten at home when he was 4.

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Yeah, and some of the comments here have me feeling like none of us are qualified to say anything about anything until we're dead. ;)

 

Now since we are all equally not dead, we might as well all jump into the scrum and enjoy it.

 

Rosie

:iagree: I don't know what scrum is, but it sounds delicious.

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Yeah, and some of the comments here have me feeling like none of us are qualified to say anything about anything until we're dead. ;)

 

Now since we are all equally not dead, we might as well all jump into the scrum and enjoy it.

 

Rosie

 

Rosie!! I puffy heart love you! And for the record.. I've been mostly dead all day! :p

 

As for the scrum practice, did that guy just ahem check that other guy for a hernia?? :eek:

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Rosie!! I puffy heart love you! And for the record.. I've been mostly dead all day! :p

 

As for the scrum practice, did that guy just ahem check that other guy for a hernia?? :eek:

They were rather close.

 

Know how I know I have too many males in my life? My first thought was... wonder how many poots to the face the back row takes on any given practice.... :p

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They were rather close.

 

Know how I know I have too many males in my life? My first thought was... wonder how many poots to the face the back row takes on any given practice.... :p

 

:lol::lol::lol::lol: Oh my gosh! Thank God I wasn't eating or drinking anything when I read that I totally would have choked! It must be brutal to be on the back row after taco night! :svengo::lol:

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