Jump to content

Menu

"Please accept my apology for the incontinence."


Recommended Posts

Did my thread title catch your attention? Someone sent that in an email to hundreds of employees and contractors. He has degrees from Lehigh and Villanova Universities. He is the Chief Operating Officer of a flourishing business. The Company's success is due in large part to his ability to creatively solve problems, organize, think outside the box, and apply advanced technology. In spite of his success, he has banned himself from internet chat rooms because his spelling is so poor that people assume he is a child. He is not Southern, uneducated, under-educated, ignorant, or stupid. He is dyslexic. He was diagnosed at a young age, appropriate interventions were applied, and his dyslexia was remediated to the greatest extent possible.

 

I am posting this because some of the comments in recent spelling threads irritated me on behalf of my two dyslexic daughters. I am not upset or mad, and I have no idea who posted the comments that rubbed me the wrong way. I am just providing information and perspective.

 

I'll get off my soapbox and maybe go find a picture of a man in a kilt now. :001_smile:

 

ETA: Post #8 is an explanation of the Southern reference. Of course, I know that Southerners can spell correctly, cuz I r one.

Edited by LizzyBee
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting.

 

But why does Southern fit in with the rest of those adjectives?

 

I wondered about that for a sec...but then I remembered I was driving down the highway today and saw a sign that said "tender ribs...no teeth required"...only in the south :lol::lol:

 

Oh, did I say driving? I meant I was walkin by...barefoot and pregnant :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I was reading your first sentence I was thinking "I bet it's dyslexia" and then *there it was* in your post.

 

Isn't it wonderful that he learned to cope and function with that dyslexia enough to get the education he got and the job he has?

 

My dh and dd have dyslexia. It's embarrassing sometimes... and you can't make it go away... but it's not a "life sentence."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Being a Southerner has absolutely nothing to do with the ability to spell well. I just have to point that out.

 

Otherwise, I completely agree with what you say. My father is an incredibly educated, wise man. However, he can't spell. A friend's lovely, smart DD can't spell worth a flip. She depends on spell check and has great coping skills, but it's a problem she will always have. A close friend who was a math teacher and is now a high school principal has dyslexia, but is aware of it enough that he never sends out anything without running it by his wife or secretary first. The lack of an ability to spell is not an indicator of a lack of intelligence.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting.

 

But why does Southern fit in with the rest of those adjectives?

 

It's a reference to some of the spelling threads. No offense intended. I live in the South and know that being Southern has no bearing on one's ability to use correct spelling and grammar conventions. :-)

Edited by LizzyBee
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My husband is director of operations for a small company. He is not dyslexic, but he always has either me or his assistant proof company wide emails and important letters before he sends them. Fresh eyes make mistakes easy to see.

 

It makes him and the company look better and doesn't take much time. It's a good coping mechanism for any poor spellers--for whatever reason.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would love to chat about this, but I have to put the possum on the stove and marry my cousin and brew some moonshine and hoist my

Confederate flag and polish my Richard Petty bust. With all that going on, it is no wonder I can't spell.

 

Terri

 

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wondered about that for a sec...but then I remembered I was driving down the highway today and saw a sign that said "tender ribs...no teeth required"...only in the south :lol::lol:

 

Oh, did I say driving? I meant I was walkin by...barefoot and pregnant :D

 

That reminds me of the time we were driving to the beach and went by a combined restaurant and gas station. The sign said, "Eat here. Get gas."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I saw that, I would assume it was some kind of auto-correct mistake and think that someone in that position should have someone else proofread any mass emails before sending them out.

 

:iagree: I don't think that is a dyslexic problem. It's a delegation problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Being a Southerner has absolutely nothing to do with the ability to spell well. I just have to point that out.

 

Otherwise, I completely agree with what you say. My father is an incredibly educated, wise man. However, he can't spell. A friend's lovely, smart DD can't spell worth a flip. She depends on spell check and has great coping skills, but it's a problem she will always have. A close friend who was a math teacher and is now a high school principal has dyslexia, but is aware of it enough that he never sends out anything without running it by his wife or secretary first. The lack of an ability to spell is not an indicator of a lack of intelligence.

 

:iagree::iagree:

My brother is dyslexic...and can not spell..or even read well because my parents thought he was just dumb. He is NOT dumb! Anything but! This man took apart car engines and got them working again at 13!! He runs a successful business, which he started at 22, and continues to run 30 years later....which has grown to include many employees. He can do all sorts of math in his head...figure a bill...figure his grocery cost....figure payroll and even taxes etc....in his HEAD!

 

He listens constantly to the news, books, music etc....to make up for the fact that his eyes and brain do not cooperate with the words he sees. I think if he were a child now, he would have received the services he needed then...and he would be a much less frustrated adult, and who knows what he could hVe accomplished?

 

Dyslexic is not stupid....dyslexic is just a difference. He proves to me daily what a person can overcome if they are stubborn enough to overcome the differences and forge ahead.

 

Faithe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My dh has a 'problem solver, think outside the box, innovative' type job. He's the 'idea man', and he also makes the ideas happen, or else delegates to his employees. He's a VERY smart man; I could NEVER do what he does, not in a million years.

 

It is very common, when he's at home in the evenings doing work, for him to call out to me 'How do you spell ______' He just isn't a natural speller. He also struggles with correclty pronouncing words sometimes. I've explained to him, as kindly as I can, that incorrect pronunciation and poor spelling can give the IMPRESSION that one is undeducated. So he asks for help with spelling, and if I hear him mispronounce something, I discreetly correct him (usually later). He also frequently asks me to proofread things like powerpoint presentations and what not.

 

Dh doesn't have dyslexia or anything. I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that he didn't value education as a child/teen, and *barely* graduated higschool; his dd was born just two months after his graduation. So, he missed a lot of opportunity as a youngster to broaden his vocabulary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:iagree: I don't think that is a dyslexic problem. It's a delegation problem.

 

:iagree:My dh has someone who works under him who has dyslexia. Dh REQUIRES this man to send him every. single. email he writes so that my dh can proof it before it goes out. The spelling is horrible and it makes the company look bad. You CANNOT send an email to customers with spelling mistakes.

 

My dd is dyslexic. She has atrocious spelling and always will. She sends me everything she writes in college to proofread or has one of her roomies do it. There is NO excuse for sending out a document that looks like a second grader wrote it. And I always tell her that. No, you're not stupid, but guess what? Whoever gets a paper from you with that many spelling errors will think you are. And you know what else? It's YOUR problem, not theirs....they don't care. Your boss won't care either. You have dyslexia, so what? All that means is you have to work twice as hard as everyone else. The world won't accept that as an excuse for her and I won't either.

 

The CEO who sent that out made a grave error...he should ALWAYS have another person (not the spell check) proof his emails. He did look stupid...and it's his own fault.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I saw that, I would assume it was some kind of auto-correct mistake and think that someone in that position should have someone else proofread any mass emails before sending them out.

 

:iagree: My very first thought when I saw that is that someone was typing on an ipad/ipod/iphone and I thanked Apple once again for the laughs. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I saw that, I would assume it was some kind of auto-correct mistake and think that someone in that position should have someone else proofread any mass emails before sending them out.

 

If I saw that, I would laugh and post about it on my Facebook status (without identifying the person or company). I did exactly that when the same error showed up in a state agency email last year.

Edited by WordGirl
Link to comment
Share on other sites

:iagree: I don't think that is a dyslexic problem. It's a delegation problem.

 

It did cross my mind that maybe his secretary was out sick that day. :001_smile:

 

But what if a dyslexic mom who is a poor speller wants to post here, and she reads threads that are judgmental toward poor spellers? She doesn't have a secretary to proofread her posts. She's not going to post, and that means she won't get the homeschooling help she needs.

 

I tell my dyslexic girls all the time that everyone has weaknesses, and all that means is that you have to work a lot harder than other people on your weak areas. But (and I don't tell them this part because I won't let them give up too soon) sometimes all the hard work in the world isn't enough. Some people will never learn how to spell. That doesn't mean they're not smart, and it doesn't mean they don't have other valuable talents. Ironically, my older dyslexic dd is a gifted writer and wants to be a fiction writer and editor. It blows my mind that her greatest talents and greatest weaknesses are language based! She's become a very decent speller and grammarian, but there were lots of tears along the way.

Edited by LizzyBee
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I saw that, I would assume it was some kind of auto-correct mistake and think that someone in that position should have someone else proofread any mass emails before sending them out.

:iagree:

If the author is aware that he has dyslexia and if he is in such an important position, he needs an actual human to proof read, not just the computer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would love to chat about this, but I have to put the possum on the stove and marry my cousin and brew some moonshine and hoist my

Confederate flag and polish my Richard Petty bust. With all that going on, it is no wonder I can't spell.

 

Terri

 

Sorry. You gave yourself away with the use of complete sentences and the word, "hoist." Please allow me to translate for you:

 

I'd love to chat with y'all about this, but I am fixin' to git my possum tah cookin' for my cousin/husband. He's been a'drankin' his tonic all day, so I got to start the new mash a'goin'. Hits also time to git the colors a'flyin' and polish my statue of The King. Petty, not Elvis, git wit the times! I'm busier'n a pup with two tails...I ain't got time to give a lick about spellin'!

 

:lol:

 

 

I am really glad I avoided reading the spelling/Southern thread. I opened it and read the OP, and decided I should just walk away. I gather I made the right decision.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:iagree:

 

It did cross my mind that maybe his secretary was out sick that day. :001_smile:

 

But what if a dyslexic mom who is a poor speller wants to post here, and she reads threads that are judgmental toward poor spellers? She doesn't have a secretary to proofread her posts. She's not going to post, and that means she won't get the homeschooling help she needs.

 

I tell my dyslexic girls all the time that everyone has weaknesses, and all that means is that you have to work a lot harder than other people on your weak areas. But (and I don't tell them this part because I won't let them give up too soon) sometimes all the hard work in the world isn't enough. Some people will never learn how to spell. That doesn't mean they're not smart, and it doesn't mean they don't have other valuable talents. Ironically, my older dyslexic dd is a gifted writer and wants to be a fiction writer and editor. It blows my mind that her greatest talents and greatest weaknesses are language based! She's become a very decent speller and grammarian, but there were lots of tears along the way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The "spelling = intelligence level" thing has always bugged me. I am an excellent speller (watch me spell something wrong in this post....:lol::lol::lol:) and spelling has always come easily to me. TOO easily to have anything to do with my work ethic.

 

For me, it's like getting credit for my hair color. Some of the most intelligent people I know, are terrible spellers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just for clarity.

 

I have not read where anyone here thinks spelling errors equal a lack of intelligence?

 

It is not annoying because of that.

 

It is annoying because it usually shows a lack of due diligence in editing efforts.

 

So if I am reading a teacher's blog (for an example) and she is ranting about how uneducated home schoolers are, I'm going to be both miffed and amused if her blog article is full of grammar and spelling errors. She could be a genius and I am still going to judge her written opinion, at least partially, by how well she wrote that opinion.

 

If a mom is dyslectic and wants to post here, then I hope she does. If she is worried she will be judged as unintelligent, then I will assure her that she likely won't be. (We have all made some pretty laughable flubbs for various reasons!)

 

If she is worried her post might not be completely confusing to readers, then I would suggest she have her husband, friend, or even an older child of hers look over her post to be sure it says what she wanted it to say. If that is not an option, then there are programs out there that will input the spoken word for her. (Those with major or dyslectic issues often can't get by without these programs.). If neither of those are an option, I would suggest she be willing to open up about her issue so that we readers know to ask more clarifying questions to help us help her.

 

This board is not a business situation. Nor is it a published article or other some official situation. One can expect to see more relaxed or spontaneous writing here. I think most of us do expect that and view posts with far less criticism because of that expectation.

 

Now, when I read a public school teacher's blog article about how stupid home schooling is or her students are or whatever her rant is and the article is full if grammar typos and spelling errors? Yes, I certainly question her intelligence because even if her actual opinion had any validity, her lack of professionalism in her opinion and lack of editing effort discredits her.

 

If a CEO is offering a genuine apology to his entire company staff, it looks like it wasn't sincere if he doesn't even take the time to look over it before sending it. It might not be. But that is how it comes off. In this economic climate where just about everyone is tip toeing about cautiously to avoid doing anything that might hurt their job or job prospects, little mistakes have more impact than they did a few years ago.

 

ETA: This post is not an official or professional or published literary work of any sort. Therefore, I absolve myself of editing duties. ;) (Tho I am on iPad and have already edited this post twice!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The "spelling = intelligence level" thing has always bugged me. I am an excellent speller (watch me spell something wrong in this post....:lol::lol::lol:) and spelling has always come easily to me. TOO easily to have anything to do with my work ethic.

 

For me, it's like getting credit for my hair color. Some of the most intelligent people I know, are terrible spellers.

 

:001_huh: What does intelligence have to do with work ethic?

 

A person can be an idiot and still be a nice hard working person.

A person can be a genius and still be a lazy slob.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, I'll display my ignorance and say that I don't get the connection between being dyslexic and using the word incontinence in a company-wide email.

 

Tara

 

 

It probably doesn't, only that my mind goes right to dyslexia when I see odd writing errors.

 

I agree that memos should be read and re-read, and by multiple people, before being sent. Sometimes there is a time crunch and it doesn't happen. Plus, autocorrect can be a real pain. I am amazed by the sorts of 'leaps in logic' made by that programming. Good for laughs at times, but quite frustrating.

Edited by LibraryLover
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I am really glad I avoided reading the spelling/Southern thread. I opened it and read the OP, and decided I should just walk away. I gather I made the right decision.

 

:iagree:

 

There are many times that I've ventured into a thread and just turned around and left. One has to do that periodically. If my spelling was poor due to dyslexia or really any reason, I personally would police myself and not enter threads on such topics. If I did enter, by mistake, I would leave. One has to do that. It isn't the responsibility of others to walk on egg shells because I might be offended by something that doesn't necessarily offend many.

 

I'm sympathetic to anyone who gets hurt or offended on any subject. I wish it wouldn't be the case, ever, but that isn't realistic. People have different opinions. It is up to every individual to take some responsibility for themselves and simply choose not to participate.

 

My 26 year old son is severely dyslexic. I just mentioned this to him, and he said it is understandable for people to be sensitive to this. He will live his whole life learning to deal with and manage his poor spelling. Additionally, he stated that if he got offended by every comment about how poor spelling was annoying, he would never get out of bed. He just doesn't read posts or threads about such things. It's just what he has to do to learn to live with dyslexia.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a good speller. When I don't know how to spell a word or wonder whether I'm using it correctly, I look it up. Why can't those who are not good spellers?

 

Some reasons:

We don't know we are spelling a word incorrectly.

 

It can be annoying or bothersome to look up many words. For some of us to spell everything we want correctly would involve looking up as much as one or two words a sentence.

 

It's hard to look up how to spell a word when you don't know how to spell it. I usually have to look up words in a convoluted way. (I was going to explain how, but I don't know how to spell... What I have it I use a "Thesaurus". --- I had to Google the phrase, "Words that mean the same" to find out how to spell thesaurus.

 

I know I often will substitute one word for another, when I have no idea how to spell the word I'm wanting to use. Other words I try to get around never using. (For example you know those things you use to cut with. Begins with a letter "s". I think I have looked up how to spell it at least a dozen times. I even tired typing it out twenty times in a row. I still can't even spell it well enough for a spell checker to guess what I'm trying to spell)

 

I know I can look up a word, read it, copy it, listen to it said as a audio recording. Say it along with a audio recording. Repeat this action a dozen times - and I still wouldn't know how to spell it. So it's not a matter of look up how it's spelt so you will know it next time. :glare:

 

For the example of incontinence versus inconvenience.

 

1) Realize they mis-spelt inconvenience as incontinence.

 

2) Know how to spell inconvenience well enough to find out how to spell it properly.

 

3) Give up and try rewording your sentence so you don't have to use the word, "Inconvenience". If so you might end up using a word you can't spell, that is hopefully easier to find out how to spell it then "inconvenience".

 

3) If they can't spell it close enough, or find another word to us. You can try Googling it:

 

-- Search for "Dictionary" and "Not a good time"

-- If that doesn't work try searching for other easy to spell definitions or inconvenience.

 

4) Oh and do this for sometimes as many as 1 word per sentence. Most likely well working on a dead line and maybe on a device with a small screen.

 

And know that no matter how hard you try spelling mistakes will get through and you will be looked down on as a bad speller and possibly not smart. So WHY bother trying to hard to begin with.

 

... or and along the way also be editing for grammar, since you are likely having to always reword things to get around your bad spelling. So this messes with the flow of words coming out of your head.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just for clarity.

 

I have not read where anyone here thinks spelling errors equal a lack of intelligence?

 

It is not annoying because of that.

 

It is annoying because it usually shows a lack of due diligence in editing efforts.

 

So if I am reading a teacher's blog (for an example) and she is ranting about how uneducated home schoolers are, I'm going to be both miffed and amused if her blog article is full of grammar and spelling errors. She could be a genius and I am still going to judge her written opinion, at least partially, by how well she wrote that opinion.

 

If a mom is dyslectic and wants to post here, then I hope she does. If she is worried she will be judged as unintelligent, then I will assure her that she likely won't be. (We have all made some pretty laughable flubbs for various reasons!)

 

If she is worried her post might not be completely confusing to readers, then I would suggest she have her husband, friend, or even an older child of hers look over her post to be sure it says what she wanted it to say. If that is not an option, then there are programs out there that will input the spoken word for her. (Those with major or dyslectic issues often can't get by without these programs.). If neither of those are an option, I would suggest she be willing to open up about her issue so that we readers know to ask more clarifying questions to help us help her.

 

This board is not a business situation. Nor is it a published article or other some official situation. One can expect to see more relaxed or spontaneous writing here. I think most of us do expect that and view posts with far less criticism because of that expectation.

 

Now, when I read a public school teacher's blog article about how stupid home schooling is or her students are or whatever her rant is and the article is full if grammar typos and spelling errors? Yes, I certainly question her intelligence because even if her actual opinion had any validity, her lack of professionalism in her opinion and lack of editing effort discredits her.

 

If a CEO is offering a genuine apology to his entire company staff, it looks like it wasn't sincere if he doesn't even take the time to look over it before sending it. It might not be. But that is how it comes off. In this economic climate where just about everyone is tip toeing about cautiously to avoid doing anything that might hurt their job or job prospects, little mistakes have more impact than they did a few years ago.

 

ETA: This post is not an official or professional or published literary work of any sort. Therefore, I absolve myself of editing duties. ;) (Tho I am on iPad and have already edited this post twice!)

 

You must have missed the thread a week or so ago where several people said that substituting one word for another is caused by stupidity.

 

On a personal level, I agree that spelling and grammar errors make a writer appear unprofessional. I have told my kids umpteen times that they can have a brilliant idea or opinion, but no-one will care if their writing is full of errors. On the other hand, having kids with dyslexia has challenged many of my own assumptions about intelligence and writing skills. I still cringe at spelling and grammar errors, but I am a lot less judgmental toward the writer because I've seen how hard my kids have to work to achieve results that many would deem substandard. Don't misunderstand me; there's nothing wrong with hard work, but my mama's heart hurts for kids (and the adults they grow into) who work twice as hard as others only to be told that it's not good enough and they could do better if they'd just try harder.

Edited by LizzyBee
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would love to chat about this, but I have to put the possum on the stove and marry my cousin and brew some moonshine and hoist my

Confederate flag and polish my Richard Petty bust. With all that going on, it is no wonder I can't spell.

 

Terri

 

I live in Arkansas and was flipping through the TV channels the other day and landed on a PBS show titled Arkansas ? ( Can't remember the second part of the name). Anyways, the lady was cooking squirrel tamales. I about died laughing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That mistake doesn't seem likea dyslexia mistake. It seems like a missed autocorrect mistake. I agree that several pairs of eyes need to proof important memos. Some people work odd hours. My dh is not dyslexic, he's a gifted writer as well as speller, and he often sends emails to people in various time zones. It's good he's gifted this way, as who do you get to proofread something at 2am, your time. People don't often want to wait hours for replies. Some people live in a crazy 24 hour business world, and now we have to deal with autocorrect. ;) Even good eyes can miss obvious problems.

Edited by LibraryLover
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a good speller. When I don't know how to spell a word or wonder whether I'm using it correctly, I look it up. Why can't those who are not good spellers?

 

Some reasons:

We don't know we are spelling a word incorrectly.

 

It can be annoying or bothersome to look up many words. For some of us to spell everything we want correctly would involve looking up as much as one or two words a sentence.

 

It's hard to look up how to spell a word when you don't know how to spell it. I usually have to look up words in a convoluted way. (I was going to explain how, but I don't know how to spell... What I have it I use a "Thesaurus". --- I had to Google the phrase, "Words that mean the same" to find out how to spell thesaurus.

 

I know I often will substitute one word for another, when I have no idea how to spell the word I'm wanting to use. Other words I try to get around never using. (For example you know those things you use to cut with. Begins with a letter "s". I think I have looked up how to spell it at least a dozen times. I even tired typing it out twenty times in a row. I still can't even spell it well enough for a spell checker to guess what I'm trying to spell)

 

I know I can look up a word, read it, copy it, listen to it said as a audio recording. Say it along with a audio recording. Repeat this action a dozen times - and I still wouldn't know how to spell it. So it's not a matter of look up how it's spelt so you will know it next time. :glare:

 

For the example of incontinence versus inconvenience.

 

1) Realize they mis-spelt inconvenience as incontinence.

 

2) Know how to spell inconvenience well enough to find out how to spell it properly.

 

3) Give up and try rewording your sentence so you don't have to use the word, "Inconvenience". If so you might end up using a word you can't spell, that is hopefully easier to find out how to spell it then "inconvenience".

 

3) If they can't spell it close enough, or find another word to us. You can try Googling it:

 

-- Search for "Dictionary" and "Not a good time"

-- If that doesn't work try searching for other easy to spell definitions or inconvenience.

 

4) Oh and do this for sometimes as many as 1 word per sentence. Most likely well working on a dead line and maybe on a device with a small screen.

 

And know that no matter how hard you try spelling mistakes will get through and you will be looked down on as a bad speller and possibly not smart. So WHY bother trying to hard to begin with.

 

... or and along the way also be editing for grammar, since you are likely having to always reword things to get around your bad spelling. So this messes with the flow of words coming out of your head.

 

:iagree::iagree::iagree::iagree:

 

One of my most frequently used website is merriam-webster, but sometimes I still have to substitute words. If I am posting on a message board I am not going to be spending a lot of time looking up words to post. I am going to assume that people have some compassion and understanding that this is a conversation not a manifest. However when I was at uni I certainly had someone proofread everything I wrote. I also encourage my students to do the same. If I am going to write a blog post slamming someone's grammar then I would of course have someone read it so that I hadn't made mistakes myself. But I don't walk around with a dictionary and a style guide to make sure I don't make a mistake in every day conversation, which is what I consider entries on a message board to be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I saw that, I would assume it was some kind of auto-correct mistake and think that someone in that position should have someone else proofread any mass emails before sending them out.

 

This. My dh actually got that email, or one with the same error, and forwarded it to me because he thought it was so funny. The subject of the email he sent me with the forwarded text was "D*mn you autocorrect!" like the website.

 

It would not have occurred to me that this was a spelling error based on dyslexia or anything else.

 

ETA - We are from Alabama, since apparently being Southern is relevant here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just for clarity.

 

I have not read where anyone here thinks spelling errors equal a lack of intelligence?

 

It is not annoying because of that.

 

It is annoying because it usually shows a lack of due diligence in editing efforts.

 

So if I am reading a teacher's blog (for an example) and she is ranting about how uneducated home schoolers are, I'm going to be both miffed and amused if her blog article is full of grammar and spelling errors. She could be a genius and I am still going to judge her written opinion, at least partially, by how well she wrote that opinion.

 

If a mom is dyslectic and wants to post here, then I hope she does. If she is worried she will be judged as unintelligent, then I will assure her that she likely won't be. (We have all made some pretty laughable flubbs for various reasons!)

 

If she is worried her post might not be completely confusing to readers, then I would suggest she have her husband, friend, or even an older child of hers look over her post to be sure it says what she wanted it to say. If that is not an option, then there are programs out there that will input the spoken word for her. (Those with major or dyslectic issues often can't get by without these programs.). If neither of those are an option, I would suggest she be willing to open up about her issue so that we readers know to ask more clarifying questions to help us help her.

 

This board is not a business situation. Nor is it a published article or other some official situation. One can expect to see more relaxed or spontaneous writing here. I think most of us do expect that and view posts with far less criticism because of that expectation.

 

Now, when I read a public school teacher's blog article about how stupid home schooling is or her students are or whatever her rant is and the article is full if grammar typos and spelling errors? Yes, I certainly question her intelligence because even if her actual opinion had any validity, her lack of professionalism in her opinion and lack of editing effort discredits her.

 

If a CEO is offering a genuine apology to his entire company staff, it looks like it wasn't sincere if he doesn't even take the time to look over it before sending it. It might not be. But that is how it comes off. In this economic climate where just about everyone is tip toeing about cautiously to avoid doing anything that might hurt their job or job prospects, little mistakes have more impact than they did a few years ago.

 

ETA: This post is not an official or professional or published literary work of any sort. Therefore, I absolve myself of editing duties. ;) (Tho I am on iPad and have already edited this post twice!)

 

Sigh. Two of my four kids have dyslexia. One is severe; the other was mild-to-moderate. You have no clue how much extra work they have to do to get decent results. I worry that the one with the most severe disabilities will be able to get a job because everything takes him so much longer, it's just unbelievable. I admire his courage in keeping to it, despite having 1/5 of the results for the same amount of time as his brother. Your post is really discouraging to me because not only will my son have to cope with his disability, but with people who assume it's sheer laziness that he can't produce like they can.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You must have missed the thread a week or so ago where several people said that substituting one word for another is caused by stupidity.

 

On a personal level, I agree that spelling and grammar errors make a writer appear unprofessional. I have told my kids umpteen times that they can have a brilliant idea or opinion, but no-one will care if their writing is full of errors. On the other hand, having kids with dyslexia has challenged many of my own assumptions about intelligence and writing skills. I still cringe at spelling and grammar errors, but I am a lot less judgmental toward the writer because I've seen how hard my kids have to work to achieve results that many would deem substandard. Don't misunderstand me; there's nothing wrong with hard work, but my mama's heart hurts for kids (and the adults they grow into) who work twice as hard as others only to be told that it's not good enough and they could do better if they'd just try harder.

 

:001_huh: Yes, I did miss that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...