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Sardines: Do YOU eat them? Use them in recipes? Make me sardine-savvy, PLS!


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The only thing I know about sardines is that we used to eat the tinned ones when I was young. My mother would put squares of extra sharp cheddar on a ritz cracker and a sardine on top of that. We ate this for lunch with tomato soup.

 

WOW -- I think I could get my kids to eat that. I ADORE tomato soup.

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Talk to me about them like I am two years old. I know that I ate them tinned when I was a kid. No idea.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQJ-rZuzGz-hgcq6YD_nCww-qkYjBr61YsRrTwPOUz_ZemLeaA7

 

I will proceed under the assumption (that means I'm guessing :tongue_smilie:) that you are talking about ones that come in a can. Is that patronizing enough for you? :D

 

OK, time for one idea now, and later today I'll give you another (must dash).

 

One dish Mrs Spy Car came up with (and it is delicious) is to put canned Sardines or what we generally use instead, which are Sprats (Sprats being lightly wood-smoked canned Sardines) with their oil in a baking dish and putting them under the broiler. We use the toaster oven for this. Broil them until they start to get slightly crispy. Don't burn, but do let them start to get golden.

 

Then serve along with Japanese rice and Korean or Japanese side dishes. Absolutely delicious. Sprats are better for this dish than regular Sardines, but the latter will do in a pinch. If one has only Sardines a good pinch of Smoked Spanish Paprika will compensate for the lack of smoke flavor.

 

It is about the easiest dish in the world, but you will not believe how delicious it is. Do serve the oil up with the fish (drizzling it over, or alongside, the rice). Then watch it disappear with glee.

 

The only (slightly) tricky part is broiling the Sprats the right amount of time. If they are underdogs they will be mushy—this is not good. Don't let them burn (obviously) but error on the side of broiled.

 

It will smell like fish, so people that can not abide that smell in the house are not advised to try this. Otherwise it is to die for!

 

Bill

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I will proceed under the assumption (that means I'm guessing :tongue_smilie:) that you are talking about ones that come in a can. Is that patronizing enough for you? :D Yup -- works for me.

 

OK, time for one idea now, and later today I'll give you another (must dash). I appreciate this -- the mujadarrah was a huge hit! Keep 'em coming.

 

One dish Mrs Spy Car came up with (and it is delicious) is to put canned Sardines or what we generally use instead, which are Sprats (Sprats being lightly wood-smoked canned Sardines) with their oil in a baking dish and putting them under the broiler. We use the toaster oven for this. Broil them until they start to get slightly crispy. Don't burn, but do let them start to get golden.

 

Then serve along with Japanese rice and Korean or Japanese side dishes. Absolutely delicious. Sprats are better for this dish than regular Sardines, but the latter will do in a pinch. If one has only Sardines a good pinch of Smoked Spanish Paprika will compensate for the lack of smoke flavor.

 

It is about the easiest dish in the world, but you will not believe how delicious it is. Do serve the oil up with the fish (drizzling it over, or alongside, the rice). Then watch it disappear with glee.

 

The only (slightly) tricky part is broiling the Sprats the right amount of time. If they are underdogs they will be mushy—this is not good. Don't let them burn (obviously) but error on the side of broiled.

 

It will smell like fish, so people that can not abide that smell in the house are not advised to try this. Otherwise it is to die for!

 

Bill

 

The smell will be a problem as the house goes on the market next week, but till then, I will definitely give it a try.

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OK, I'll give you the other one now (and then scoot).

 

One can make a delicious pasta sauce by finely chopping onions (or better shallots), sautéing them in olive oil, adding massive amounts of fresh garlic slices, and Sprats (preferred) or Sardines (again add Spanish Smoked Paprika to compensate). Then let the Sprats crisp up in the olive oil (plus the oil they come in) until golden crispy.

 

One can try to leave them relatively whole, or slightly mash them depending on the pasta you plan to pair the sauce with. For a light pasta like spaghetti better to mash. If mashing do so after the whole fish skins have browned and crisped.

 

Finely minced Italian parsley cooked in the sauce is a nice optional ingredient.

 

ETA: and add capers. Yum.

 

One can add a splash of vermouth or dry white white as it cooks (optional) and definitely season to taste with fresh lemon juice.

 

Easy, nutritious, and unbelievably good.

 

Also stinky.

 

Bill

 

I'm telling you, this one is to die for too!

Edited by Spy Car
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OK, I'll give you the other one now (and then scoot).

 

One can make a delicious pasta sauce by finely chopping onions (or better shallots), sautéing them in olive oil, adding massive amounts of fresh garlic slices, and Sprats (preferred) or Sardines (again add Spanish Smoked Paprika to compensate). Then let the Sprats crisp up in the olive oil (plus the oil they come in) until golden crispy.

 

One can try to leave them relatively whole, or slightly mash them depending on the pasta you plan to pare the sauce with. For a light pasta like spaghetti better to mash. If mashing do so after the whole fish skins have browned and crisper.

 

Finely minced Italian parsley cooked in the sauce is a nice optional ingredient.

 

One can add a splash of vermouth of dry white white as it cooks (optional) and definitely season to taste with fresh lemon juice.

 

Easy, nutritious, and unbelievably good.

 

Also stinky.

 

Bill

 

I'm telling you, this one is to die for too!

 

Printing -- thank you.

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Dh and youngest dd eat them straight from the tin, served on crackers.

 

Dd fell in love with sardines as a 3 or 4 yo. She saw a pink and purple polka dot rectangular tin at Trader Joes, and HAD to have it. She was so excited to see what was inside, she would have eaten anything. :tongue_smilie: It is a good thing dh is an adventurous eater, I couldn't even look at them. :lol:

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Are you thinking of anchovies?

 

I don't cook with sardines, but anchovies are an awesome secret ingredient. They add an amazing richness to red sauce. Rachel Ray has a great puttanesca sauce you might want to try. I use the leftovers as pizza sauce.

 

Ingredients

2 tablespoons (2 turns around the pan) extra-virgin olive oil

4 to 6 cloves garlic, chopped

1 tin flat anchovy fillets, drained

1 /2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

20 oil-cured black olives, cracked away from pit and coarsely chopped

3 tablespoons capers

1 (32-ounce) can chunky style crushed tomatoes

1 (14.5-ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained

A few grinds black pepper

1/4 cup (a couple of handfuls) flat leaf parsley, chopped

1 pound spaghetti, cooked to al dente (with a bite)

Crusty bread, for mopping

Grated Parmigiano Reggiano or Romano, for passing, optional

Directions

Serving suggestions: a simple salad of mixed bitter greens dressed with oil and vinegar, salt, and pepper, recipe follows

 

Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add oil, garlic, anchovies, and crushed pepper. Saute mixture until anchovies melt into oil and completely dissolve and garlic is tender, about 3 minutes: your kitchen never smelled so good! Add olives, capers, tomatoes, black pepper, and parsley. Bring sauce to a bubble, reduce heat, and simmer 8 to 10 minutes.

 

Toss sauce with cooked pasta. Pass bread and cheese at the table and serve with a simple salad of mixed bitter greens dressed with oil and vinegar, salt, and pepper.

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My kids and I like to eat sardines on toast. I buy them boneless in a tin with tomato sauce. It's yum, we can eat it for breakfast, lunch and tea!

 

Fresh or tinned? Tinned they are good on toast. Fresh they are excellent simply grilled/broiled and served with lots of lemon.

 

Laura

 

I've only ever used them in Caesar salad dressing and pasta puttanesca (sp?).

 

Are you thinking of anchovies?

 

Dh and youngest dd eat them straight from the tin, served on crackers.

 

Dd fell in love with sardines as a 3 or 4 yo. She saw a pink and purple polka dot rectangular tin at Trader Joes, and HAD to have it. She was so excited to see what was inside, she would have eaten anything. :tongue_smilie: It is a good thing dh is an adventurous eater, I couldn't even look at them. :lol:

 

I don't cook with sardines, but anchovies are an awesome secret ingredient. They add an amazing richness to red sauce. Rachel Ray has a great puttanesca sauce you might want to try. I use the leftovers as pizza sauce.

 

Ingredients

2 tablespoons (2 turns around the pan) extra-virgin olive oil

4 to 6 cloves garlic, chopped

1 tin flat anchovy fillets, drained

1 /2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

20 oil-cured black olives, cracked away from pit and coarsely chopped

3 tablespoons capers

1 (32-ounce) can chunky style crushed tomatoes

1 (14.5-ounce) can diced tomatoes, drained

A few grinds black pepper

1/4 cup (a couple of handfuls) flat leaf parsley, chopped

1 pound spaghetti, cooked to al dente (with a bite)

Crusty bread, for mopping

Grated Parmigiano Reggiano or Romano, for passing, optional

Directions

Serving suggestions: a simple salad of mixed bitter greens dressed with oil and vinegar, salt, and pepper, recipe follows

 

Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add oil, garlic, anchovies, and crushed pepper. Saute mixture until anchovies melt into oil and completely dissolve and garlic is tender, about 3 minutes: your kitchen never smelled so good! Add olives, capers, tomatoes, black pepper, and parsley. Bring sauce to a bubble, reduce heat, and simmer 8 to 10 minutes.

 

Toss sauce with cooked pasta. Pass bread and cheese at the table and serve with a simple salad of mixed bitter greens dressed with oil and vinegar, salt, and pepper.

 

We eat them on toast. We eat the boneless type packed with olive oil.

 

Thank you all -- I loved them as a kid. The kids and I will make a visit to TJ tomorrow and see what they have -- I can guarantee that if anything is in a little pink or polka dot tiny can, it will be coming back to our house -- dd11 will see to that.

 

Thanks again. -- I have printed the recipes -- now I have a stack of lentil recipes and a few very good looking sardine recipes. one of my cousins who travels to Italy a few times a year shared some with me as well.:)

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I ADORE sardines. Eat 'em straight out of the can, mostly, but lately I've been experimenting with them.

 

Then serve along with Japanese rice and Korean or Japanese side dishes.

 

In a similar vein, put either broiled or straight-from-the-can sardines into dried seawood (Nori) with a dash of Sriracha sauce. :drool5:

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Bill - your recipes sound fantastic! I'm going to search for sprats!

 

I found this and thought of you (and anyone else who might be looking for Sprats). On this website (under the can of Sprats) is a link thorugh that lists many stores around the world (by region) that stock Riga Sprats.

 

I hope there is one on the list near you!

 

http://latviansonline.com/sprats/

 

It sounds like you need to start a new thread for ALL of your favorite recipes. I bet you have some interesting ones.

 

Oddly enough, I have very few *recipes* and it drives friends crazy when they think I'm holding out on them. But I cook from instinct, feel, and experience and am always improvising depending on what is in season, what is on hand, and what's the mood of the day. So "recipes" (as such) are few. It is too static a way to think about food.

 

Bill

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If you like them a lot the way they are, you can eat them out of the can...or in salad with mayo and seasonings.

 

:iagree:

We eat them canned/smoked: kippered snacks and Russian Shprati (sprats?). I like them in sandwiches with mayonnaise, the way my British grandfather taught me to eat them, but my dh prefers them on crackers. The kids are fickle and eat them both ways (and sometimes not at all!).

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When I'm not in the mood for the fishiness (and if you don't like the taste all that much) I sometimes mix them with guacamole. Sounds weird, but I avoid store bought mayo when I can and it kind of mellows out the taste. They aren't so fishy that way ;)

 

I have to try this. I ate a tin last night for dinner on mini whole wheat pitas -- it was late.....:001_huh:.......I was exhausted. I was so thrilled that I ate something that was good for me and I enjoyed it. Tasted like tuna.

 

Tonight, I am preparing the puttanesca sauce with whole wheat pasta - dh has requested that specifically.

 

Thanks to you all again -- and keep the ideas coming.

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