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vegan, whole food diet and scrawny weaklings


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A few months ago I weighed myself and was surprised to see that I was about 50 pounds overweight. It was not attractive weight, either. If I was a stripper, the men would boo me.

 

I was so desperate to lose weight that I tried a diet I think is drastic and not healthy long term - a whole food vegan diet. No fish, chicken, dairy, white flour or sugar. Why would I think the diet is not a healthy long term diet? I have never seen any whole food vegans who are robust. All the healthy, good looking people I know eat meat, dairy and a bit of junk food. I was fat, so I figured a little of something that makes people scrawny looking would be good for me.

 

So I tried the diet. The diet stops me from craving junk. I don’t want any cookies and chips. That is a blessing! I feel lighter and more agile. The skin on my face looks younger and healthier. I can eat as much whole, vegan food as I want and lose weight. BUT, I feel weak and never feeling full starts to get me down. I lasted 10 days as a vegan. I slowly added dairy and meat back in my diet and I felt great, but it slippery sloped into adding non-so-whole foods and a little junk food. I stopped losing weight. My diet never did get as bad as it used to be.

 

Okay, so it‘s the new year, and I need to get back to losing weight. Got on the whole, vegan bandwagon again. Again, I got great results; my face looked slimmer, prettier skin, feeling lighter… BUT the weakness and hunger started to get to me. Last night I ate plain yogurt and chicken to feel sane.

 

Do you have links to pictures of sturdy looking whole food vegans? Do you have any tips for me to help me not be hungry and feel weak. I don’t like the taste of any faux meat and mock milk and such. I don’t believe we should be vegans because we should feel sorry for farm animals, so those suggestions wont encourage me. If you think people really need a bit of meat and dairy products are fine, feel free to say so too.

 

 

 

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I seem to have the opposite problem! When I eat meat and dairy I feel awful. I have low energy, have that heavy feeling, you know the one with little to no energy, and I get a foggy feeling.

 

When I am more Vegan I feel very light and energetic.

 

Now, I am not sticking to it, which is the problem, but I am doing it much better since Jan 1 and am determined to get going with it.

 

I don't know what you mean by Robust. There are many body builders who are Vegan or mostly Vegan, including Tony Horton from P90X.

 

Here are some images of Vegan body builders.

http://www.google.com/search?q=vegan+bodybuilding&hl=en&prmd=imvnsu&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=XesKT4jvB4XGtgff6YHQBg&sqi=2&ved=0CHgQsAQ&biw=1322&bih=1218

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I am curious as to your blood type. I have read Eat Right for Your Type (or parts of it) and even though I think a lot of it is hooey, I am always interested to be proven wrong.

 

In it, it states that a Type A does better with a Vegetarian/Vegan/Plant Based diet while an O Type does better with an Atkins type diet. I am indeed an A.

 

Dawn

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Well, I can assure that I know PLENTY of overweight vegans, even ones that eat healthy. :) And I'm by no means "scrawny." I'm 5'9" and I'm a size 8.

 

Here's a good site to show you not all vegans look like the ones you've apparently seen:

 

http://www.veganbodybuilding.com/

 

I don't understand why you want to eat vegan if you're hungry and think the "healthy looking" people you know all eat meat. You have no motivation so this way of eating isn't right for you.

 

If you want to incorporate more vegan meals into your diet, then I'd suggest that instead of going 100% vegan. I don't see you being happy and you can most definitely lose weight that way, if that's your only goal. Just stick with lean meats, no junk food, and no processed foods.

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I am curious as to your blood type. I have read Eat Right for Your Type (or parts of it) and even though I think a lot of it is hooey, I am always interested to be proven wrong.

 

In it, it states that a Type A does better with a Vegetarian/Vegan/Plant Based diet while an O Type does better with an Atkins type diet. I am indeed an A.

 

Dawn

I've read this and I think the whole thing is loopy buuuuut I feel much better eating meat (I'm type O) and DH feels better eating almost none (he's A). So if you're experimenting with your diet it might be worth a read.

Fwiw re vegans and health, DH and I have both been strictly vegan for a number of years in the past. I developed thyroid problems from too much unfermented soy (yes, I know that vegans don't *have* to eat a lot of soy but it was easier). Dh's teeth started to crumble which miraculously stopped within six months of adding meat back in. I've never known a long term vegan who seemed healthy, vegetarian yes but not vegan.

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Maybe lacto-ovo vegetarian but not vegan is for you.

Lacto (dairy)

ovo (eggs)

 

Make sure you are including healthy fats in your diet. Nuts, beans, avocados, olive oil are all good for you and will help you feel full. Also things like full fat milk, cheese and yogurt.

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It seems like the junk is more your problem than anything else. I'd work on getting that undercontrol first. My sister did great last year by simply cutting out everything white. No sugar, no rice, no potatoes, no bread, no coffee creamer. She also quit drinking soda - yes, even diet soda. She drinks only water or coffee. Once she detox'ed from the junk, she started exercising at one of those women's exercise places three times a week. In a year, she has become amazing. So my advice it to start by getting healthy, then decide if you want to quit meat also. It is hard to stay on a diet that you don't agree with.

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I would love it, if some of you would share your recipes. Or if you would give an idea of what your day to day diet looks like. I dabble in eating all vegetarian, but it's hard when your family doesn't eat that way too.

 

We eat so many different foods that just picking a few recipes to share would be difficult. Plus, I very rarely follow recipes and instead I find a recipe that looks interesting and I modify it to my liking. :)

 

As far as our day-to-day diet goes, I don't think it looks too much different from anyone else's, it's just veganized. :) Breakfasts are waffles, pancakes, oatmeal, tofu scrambles, all with some fruits, etc. Lunches are dinner leftovers, grilled cheese, mac-n-cheese, soup, nutbutter and jelly sandwiches, all with some veggies, etc. Snacks are fruits, veggies, nuts, granola bars, etc. Dinner might be the only thing that looks different than other dinners. Instead of meat we take the "sides" and make them our main dishes. Or, again, veganize a main dish (like lasagna). Add lots of veggies, nuts, tofu, tempeh, seitan and you have our dinners.

 

It's really not that difficult to eat veg, you just have to get used to doing it. :) Feel free to PM me with any questions! :)

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I am curious as to your blood type. I have read Eat Right for Your Type (or parts of it) and even though I think a lot of it is hooey, I am always interested to be proven wrong.

 

In it, it states that a Type A does better with a Vegetarian/Vegan/Plant Based diet while an O Type does better with an Atkins type diet. I am indeed an A.

 

Dawn

 

Huh. I'm O+ and I do not do well on a vegetarian diet at all. I love all kinds of beans and grains for carbs which should provide all necessary amino acids, but I have strong cravings for protein from animal sources. I was a high school and college runner almost right until I started having babies, and I've been breastfeeding or pregnant almost straight through since then, so I may have a higher demand for protein than the average person.

 

 

I have vegan family members who are unhealthy, but in the opposite direction from looking scrawny. I love them dearly, and I worry about them.

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If I was a stripper, the men would boo me. 

 

First of all, you are one funny lady; and I think the above would apply to a LOT of us. I know it does to me. :tongue_smilie:

 

. If you think people really need a bit of meat and dairy products are fine, feel free to say so too.

 

This.

 

I took a college nutrition course last year, and my prof was a (lacto-ovo) vegetarian. Even she said she didn't feel one could get optimal nutrition as a vegan.

 

Lean meat and low-fat dairy can totally be part of a healthy weight loss diet. Whenever I lose weight, I do NOT cut out meat and dairy; I just pick the lean/low fat versions.

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I've never known a long term vegan who seemed healthy, vegetarian yes but not vegan.

 

Hi!

 

I've been vegan for about 16 years and am one of the healthiest folks I know.

 

My kids are both life-long vegans and and significantly healthier than any of their friends.

 

Now, I'm still overweight, but that's not new. I've been overweight since childhood. A vegan life-style hasn't "fixed" that, but I have no other health problems at all. In fact, a couple of things for which I was being treated have gone away since I went vegan.

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I never knew of vegan body builders. :lol: I think super buff body builders look strange and unnatural, but it does give me evidence that veganism doesn't equal weak. Mac Danzig looks normal and strong!

 

Okay, can we further encourage me by linking a whole food vegan who looks normal and healthy. I want to know it isn't vegan white bread , chips or cake or whatever that keeps people from being too skinny.

 

And thanks to those who were so up PC to say they have noticed ill health effects of a strict vegan diet.

 

And to those I put-off. I am sorry. I am a cranky, hungry lady right now. Even beans, nuts and avacado don't keep me full.

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I am curious as to your blood type. I have read Eat Right for Your Type (or parts of it) and even though I think a lot of it is hooey, I am always interested to be proven wrong.

 

In it, it states that a Type A does better with a Vegetarian/Vegan/Plant Based diet while an O Type does better with an Atkins type diet. I am indeed an A.

 

Dawn

 

I am an A but I thrive very well on Low carb/paleo/primal diet. I did do vegan and did not do well on it at all. I craved junk food all the time when I was a vegan and had numerous health problems. Once I started low carb (atkins) everything fell into place and my health issues went away. Now doing maintenance low carb and Primal/paleo. Doing very well on it.

 

Holly

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As far as our day-to-day diet goes, I don't think it looks too much different from anyone else's, it's just veganized.

 

I agree about the daily diet thing.

 

We don't even eat that much soy.

 

Breakfast tends to be muffins or oatmeal or pancakes (with no egg or dairy, obviously) or toast alongside protein-spiked fruit smoothies for my son or soy milk and calciulm-fortified OJ for my daughter.

 

Lunch is do your own thing. My son likes left-over pasta or (to my deep shame) french fries and fruit. They both like left-over Indian food. I eat salads or soups or hummus with crackers and veggies for dipping.

 

Snacks include granola or protein bars, nuts, fruit, pretzels, pita chips, that sort of thing.

 

We eat lots of dinners of Indian-inspired foods. I'm leaning toward curried lentils for tonight's main dish. We also eat Mexican-type stuff with black beans where others might use meat. We eat pasta, baked potatoes with toppings and other, similar things.

 

It's really not that different from what "normal" people eat. We don't do many analogues or "fake" foods, except that both of my kids like soy or rice-based "ice cream" as a treat a couple of times a week.

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I am curious as to your blood type. I have read Eat Right for Your Type (or parts of it) and even though I think a lot of it is hooey, I am always interested to be proven wrong.

 

In it, it states that a Type A does better with a Vegetarian/Vegan/Plant Based diet while an O Type does better with an Atkins type diet. I am indeed an A.

 

 

I'm a A. My husband is an O. I'm vegan. He's ovo-lacto veg, although he eats very close to vegan at home.

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Hi!

 

I've been vegan for about 16 years and am one of the healthiest folks I know.

 

My kids are both life-long vegans and and significantly healthier than any of their friends.

 

 

Same here. When other kids are getting sick all the time, I sit back and smile that my two vegan children are NEVER sick. Seriously. We've been around people lately that have had the stomach flu and we got nothing. People will say to me, "Don't come near me, I'm sick." I just laugh because I know I won't get sick. :) Even my children's pediatrician compliments me on how healthy my kids are and how they're happy that they NEVER have to come in because they're sick and only for their checkups.

 

And I know a lot of nutritionists/doctors that will agree a vegan diet can be very healthy. :)

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Same here. When other kids are getting sick all the time, I sit back and smile that my two vegan children are NEVER sick. Seriously. We've been around people lately that have had the stomach flu and we got nothing. People will say to me, "Don't come near me, I'm sick." I just laugh because I know I won't get sick. :) Even my children's pediatrician compliments me on how healthy my kids are and how they're happy that they NEVER have to come in because they're sick and only for their checkups.

 

And I know a lot of nutritionists/doctors that will agree a vegan diet can be very healthy. :)

 

Yep.

 

Neither of my kids has ever had a serious health problem of any kind. Each has been on antibiotics once in their lifetime. The last time any of us were sick enough to stay in bed for a day was over a year ago, and I don't remember how long it had been before that.

 

One time, when he was a toddler, I took my son to the ER because he had a fever we couldn't bring down with Tylenol. The doctor looked him over, left the room and came back with another doctor. Then another. Then another.

 

Finally, he threw his hands up in the air and said my son was the healthiest child he'd ever seen. They couldn't find anything wrong with him to explain the fever.

 

(They sent us home with instructions to alternate Tylenol and Motrin. The kids was completely recovered by the following day, and we never did figure out what was wrong.)

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I agree about the daily diet thing.

 

We don't even eat that much soy.

 

Breakfast tends to be muffins or oatmeal or pancakes (with no egg or dairy, obviously) or toast alongside protein-spiked fruit smoothies for my son or soy milk and calciulm-fortified OJ for my daughter.

 

Lunch is do your own thing. My son likes left-over pasta or (to my deep shame) french fries and fruit. They both like left-over Indian food. I eat salads or soups or hummus with crackers and veggies for dipping.

 

Snacks include granola or protein bars, nuts, fruit, pretzels, pita chips, that sort of thing.

 

We eat lots of dinners of Indian-inspired foods. I'm leaning toward curried lentils for tonight's main dish. We also eat Mexican-type stuff with black beans where others might use meat. We eat pasta, baked potatoes with toppings and other, similar things.

 

It's really not that different from what "normal" people eat. We don't do many analogues or "fake" foods, except that both of my kids like soy or rice-based "ice cream" as a treat a couple of times a week.

 

Do you buy special protein bars and I assume protein powder for the shakes? I though that most contain whey and casein. My husband can't have any of those because of his dairy issues. I've seen some with soy too, but I'm trying to think of any types that are completely vegan. I've never really paid attention to that before, so I could easily have missed it.

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Do you buy special protein bars and I assume protein powder for the shakes? I though that most contain whey and casein. My husband can't have any of those because of his dairy issues. I've seen some with soy too, but I'm trying to think of any types that are completely vegan. I've never really paid attention to that before, so I could easily have missed it.

 

I use Spirutein powder mixed with a soy-free one (the brand name of which I can't remember at the moment) for the smoothies. Both are dairy free.

 

They eat Clif zBars, which may not be appropriate for your husband, because they may contain traces of dairy as a result of the facility where they are processed. But they don't have any dairy in them on purpose.

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I'm kind of a vegetarian, but I need to take in plenty of cheeses, milk and other dairy daily to feel satisfied. Eggs, fish and nuts I do, but no soy due to side effects, and I do occasionally eat ham during the holidays.

 

I'm not overweight and lost to my 20 year-old weight with ease cutting out the majority of carbs. Gluten doesn't mesh with my system and I avoid carbs like chips, and breads.

 

Giving up meat was easy, but loosing the monthly potato chips and lots of home-made bread was tough for me. (I don't crave carbs or chocolate anymore; and I don't consume any caffeine.)

 

Consider finding the foods that make you feel well and come up with your own diet.

 

 

A few months ago I weighed myself and was surprised to see that I was about 50 pounds overweight. It was not attractive weight, either. If I was a stripper, the men would boo me.

 

I was so desperate to lose weight that I tried a diet I think is drastic and not healthy long term - a whole food vegan diet. No fish, chicken, dairy, white flour or sugar. Why would I think the diet is not a healthy long term diet? I have never seen any whole food vegans who are robust. All the healthy, good looking people I know eat meat, dairy and a bit of junk food. I was fat, so I figured a little of something that makes people scrawny looking would be good for me.

 

So I tried the diet. The diet stops me from craving junk. I don’t want any cookies and chips. That is a blessing! I feel lighter and more agile. The skin on my face looks younger and healthier. I can eat as much whole, vegan food as I want and lose weight. BUT, I feel weak and never feeling full starts to get me down. I lasted 10 days as a vegan. I slowly added dairy and meat back in my diet and I felt great, but it slippery sloped into adding non-so-whole foods and a little junk food. I stopped losing weight. My diet never did get as bad as it used to be.

 

Okay, so it‘s the new year, and I need to get back to losing weight. Got on the whole, vegan bandwagon again. Again, I got great results; my face looked slimmer, prettier skin, feeling lighter… BUT the weakness and hunger started to get to me. Last night I ate plain yogurt and chicken to feel sane.

 

Do you have links to pictures of sturdy looking whole food vegans? Do you have any tips for me to help me not be hungry and feel weak. I don’t like the taste of any faux meat and mock milk and such. I don’t believe we should be vegans because we should feel sorry for farm animals, so those suggestions wont encourage me. If you think people really need a bit of meat and dairy products are fine, feel free to say so too.

 

 

 

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Okay, can we further encourage me by linking a whole food vegan who looks normal and healthy. I want to know it isn't vegan white bread , chips or cake or whatever that keeps people from being too skinny.

 

 

 

Just look up celebrity vegans/athletes. I don't think any of them (Mike Tyson, Ellen Degeneres, Alicia Silverstone, etc) look too skinny. :)

 

And if someone is eating white bread, chips and cake, I highly doubt they're skinny unless they're blessed with a great metabolism.

 

I don't think you should be looking into veganism any further. It's not for you. Like others mentioned, cut out the junk and the processed foods. Stop looking to healthy vegans for inspiration. It won't do you any good. Look for people that eat the way you WANT to eat and go from there. Keep in mind, not everyone is the same. You have to find what way of eating is right for YOU.

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I use Spirutein powder mixed with a soy-free one (the brand name of which I can't remember at the moment) for the smoothies. Both are dairy free.

 

They eat Clif zBars, which may not be appropriate for your husband, because they may contain traces of dairy as a result of the facility where they are processed. But they don't have any dairy in them on purpose.

 

Wow, thanks so much! I'll have to check those out!

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If you don't feel good on a vegan diet and you don't believe in it for ethical/enviornmental reasons, then why continue? There are plenty of other ways to lose weight eating the way you want to and feel best. I second (third?) the suggestion of paleo. I started the Whole 30 on January 1st and have already lost 7 pounds http://whole9life.com/category/whole-30/

 

As an aside, I think you would be hard-pressed to find very many healthy (not meaning skinny) adult junk-food vegans. Part of eating vegan is health-based, so most vegan diets are very healthy, incorporating lots of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans/legumes to make complete proteins, etc. Did you research vegan eating before beginning to eat vegan or just cut out all meat/animal products? If you are committed to eating vegan for weight-loss, perhaps the problem is that you are not getting enough complete protein combinations?

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If you don't feel good on a vegan diet and you don't believe in it for ethical/enviornmental reasons, then why continue? There are plenty of other ways to lose weight eating the way you want to and feel best. I second (third?) the suggestion of paleo. I started the Whole 30 on January 1st and have already lost 7 pounds http://whole9life.com/category/whole-30/

 

As an aside, I think you would be hard-pressed to find very many healthy (not meaning skinny) adult junk-food vegans. Part of eating vegan is health-based, so most vegan diets are very healthy, incorporating lots of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans/legumes to make complete proteins, etc. Did you research vegan eating before beginning to eat vegan or just cut out all meat/animal products? If you are committed to eating vegan for weight-loss, perhaps the problem is that you are not getting enough complete protein combinations?

 

 

:iagree:

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I was going nuts yesterday. I underestimated how hard it would be to go whole food vegan. First of all, I need more protein than I thought I did. I was eating a lot of veggies and I think it was the lack of protein that made me so hungry I was beginning to think the diet was just one step up from starving myself. I am going to put more effort into getting vegan protein. Secondly, it is not easy to get the food I want to eat. On Sunday I went to the store and these are the things they did not have which were on my list; tortillas, carrots, broccoli, alfalfa sprouts, strawberries and avocados. That knocked some dishes off my menu. Today I went to a different store and bought tortillas made with white flour because that was the only kind they had. I made some Mexican inspired food that was really yummy and filling. I think I am going to have to make such compromises, because being strict was starting to stop me from functioning normally. I was that hungry.

 

I was never considering sticking to a vegan diet for life, just a whole food vegan diet for a month. I wanted it to be like a cleansing. Some people fast, or juice, I wanted to do this. I have learned that vegans are not all scrawny weaklings. I like that Whole 30 site. That might be my next step, after this. I don't know my blood type, so I don't know how that factors in. I called my mom to ask her, but I didn't get through. Thanks to all who responded.

 

And remember how I said if I was a stripper the men would boo me back when I was 50 pounds overweight. Well now I think some senior citizens would clap for me. :D

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I am curious as to your blood type. I have read Eat Right for Your Type (or parts of it) and even though I think a lot of it is hooey, I am always interested to be proven wrong.

 

In it, it states that a Type A does better with a Vegetarian/Vegan/Plant Based diet while an O Type does better with an Atkins type diet. I am indeed an A.

 

Dawn

 

That's interesting. I'm type O and I definitely feel better on a low-carb, protein-heavy diet. Eating Paleo is tough for me because I CRAVE carbs like nothing (and can't stop once I start), but it seems to be exactly what my body needs. Meats, eggs, nuts and seeds, lots of veggies, fruits, and healthy fats such as coconut and avocado. And little or no sugar!

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Man, I WISH we still did a vegan diet around here. After my 2nd dd was born, my husband and I went vegan. I have to say, I think you're not sticking it out long enough. For the first 2-3 weeks I DID feel weak and had serious cravings. After that initial phase, though, I felt really great. We only stayed on a strict diet for about 6 months, and then we gradually added back in dairy and lean meats. During that time, I lost all my baby weight (about 30 lbs.). I would do it again if my family would cooperate, but my husband hated not eating meat, so we remain omnivores.

 

This is an uneducated guess, but I would chalk up an initial period of feeling weak or feeling bad to withdrawal from certain foods. Your body is used to certain substances, good or bad, and drastic changes can affect you negatively in the beginning.

 

Personally, I would start with small changes instead of drastic ones. Eliminate all the junk food and make a decision to cut out sweet drinks and sodas. Stop eating sugar and refined/processed grains and don't eat anything fried. Those things alone, practiced on a consistent basis, can make a big difference in your weight and in how you feel.

 

As for "scrawny" vegans: there have been studies that show skinnier people live longer, even those that are slightly underweight, so I certainly wouldn't view people with a little *fat* on their bones as having the healthy edge, necessarily. Health isn't measured in a scale number anyway, and different body types exemplify health in myriad ways.

 

I don't see why anyone needs to prove to you that vegans can be, well, meaty :D since you can use Google like the rest of us. :tongue_smilie: Eliminate foods from your diet that make you feel bad, make you fat, and that you already know are bad for your health. Aim for health instead of a certain weight or size. Educate yourself on nutrition and make it a lifestyle instead of a diet.

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You said you were only on the diet for 10 days, so I'm wondering if you are confusing "hunger" with "cravings" - two entirely different things. It's a mind over matter thing that might take you months to overcome.

 

Your body is used to meat and dairy, etc. When you stop eating it, it's going to crave meat and dairy no matter how much you eat. I think if you really want to go vegan you have to commit to doing it for several months without slip ups before you'll really switch your taste buds and your body's reactions to being used to it.

 

Having said that, only you know if veganism is right for you. I would love to be vegan, but I am completely intolerant of soy - which shows up heavily as a protein in tons of vegan recipes. I can't eat any of the meat/dairy "substitutes" on the market. I have a highly allergic child to nuts/treenuts, so I can't make any recipes calling for nuts. That makes being vegan a poor choice for me.

 

I can easily lose weigh by restricting calories, however, and I am healthiest when I eat tiny portions of meat and almost no dairy, or tiny portions of dairy and no meat at all.

 

You don't sound happy about the idea of being a Vegan, so why do it at all? Have you tried "Just Tell Me What to Eat," By Dr. Timothy Harlan? It's a really no-nonsense cookbook with diet info that literally tells you what to eat each day. The recipes are very basic and I don't think any American would find them weird or off-putting. Take a look online and see what you think.

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I didn't crave junk, meat or dairy products. I was hungry. I think I need more vegan protein.

 

As for "scrawny" vegans: there have been studies that show skinnier people live longer, even those that are slightly underweight, so I certainly wouldn't view people with a little *fat* on their bones as having the healthy edge, necessarily.

 

A lot of my motivation for eating healthier food is vanity. I enjoy and appreciate the health benefits, yes, but I got to be honest and say, I want to look prettier. I don't want to look half starved and worn out. I did not look like that, but I felt like that by day 8 of this diet.

 

I think if I eat more vegan protein I will feel much better. I want to finish this month as whole food vegan as I can because this is my way of detoxing or cleansing. I don't want to do anything more drastic, like a water fast, or a lemonade and maple syrup diet, or even a raw veggie juice diet because I need to stay moderately active and I breastfeed.

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Even beans, nuts and avacado don't keep me full.

 

Are you eating enough carbs then?

 

As a general rule, I find if I don't eat enough fat with the meal, I could have eaten two big bowls of dinner and I'll still be mooching about looking for nibblies. If I am satisfied after eating but I get hungry less than two hours later, I haven't eaten enough carbs.

 

Rosie

Edited by Rosie_0801
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Hi OP :)

Good for you for trying to eat healthier! Others have mentioned that initially you may go through withdrawals, you may also go through a detox phase if you aren't accustomed to eating a lot of fruit and veggies. If you are hungry all the time I recommend not depriving yourself. Have a lot of snack options on hand like nuts, fruits and veggies. If you are looking for recipes this book, The Vegan Planet, has a lot of yummy recipes.

 

Here is a list of vegan athletes.

 

And finally, meet Amanda Riester - boxer, cancer survivor, body builder, and vegan.

 

amandar.jpg

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Nope. I was eating lots of salad. The carbs I planned didn't work out. For instance, I had planned to have hot cereal cooked in almond milk, but as my daughter said, "It tastes like you put baby oil in it."

 

Ack! You need some emergency hot cereal help:

 

http://blog.fatfreevegan.com/2008/02/oatmeal-its-whats-for-breakfast.html

 

I haven't tried the cherry pie yet, but the apple spice was awesome! (I love her recipes, and I'm not currently vegan or really planning to be.).

 

ETA: You could try apple juice in hot cereal if hot almond milk makes it unappealing. It's especially good with apples, brown sugar, cinnamon etc in the oatmeal.

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I can empathize. I have cycled in and out of veganism for years. Right now I have 10 pounds of baby weight left to lose. I guess I am different as i tend to lose weight when i do eat meat or eggs-- I only eat poultry and fish though. I also suffer from the not full feeling (when eating vegan), and eating tons and tons of greens gets old. I start to feel like a cow put out to pasture. Plus its tempting to go for the bad vegan stuff like chocolate chip granola, vegan cakes, and so on.

 

The nytimes recently had an article on vegan body builders... it might be worth looking up.

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I've seen a few people say that they didn't feel full when they went vegan or that they ate nothing but greens and I just want to say that I very RARELY eat salads. LOL. And if I did, I'd be hungry and never satisfied either! :D You really do have to remember that you can eat a lot of the same foods that you're used to, just modified. And you NEED fat in your diet to not only stay healthy, but to keep you feeling full and satisfied. If ever anyone is going to try the vegan route again, please, please don't just eat greens. Eat your normal foods! It will make being vegan a whole heck of a lot easier and enjoyable. :)

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Bob Harper (of The Biggest Loser) was/is vegan for years. IMHO, he is very fine. :) Many ultrarunners (people who run 50 or 100 miles AT A TIME) are vegan. They are some fine looking people, and they are obviously incredibly strong!

 

I don't live on that diet, but I totally believe it can be a very healthy diet, espcecially if you pay attention to getting lots of dark green veggies, legumes, and high protein grains such as quinoa. We emphasize those things in our diet, and I believe they are the key to a healthy diet.

 

I would bet that within 2 months of being on that diet, you'll start to feel great. Your body is detoxing, and your body must ADJUST to processing nutrients in a differnt way. This takes time.

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I'm another non-scrawny, non-weakling vegan. I seem to be virtually indestructible--I don't get sick, I seem to have more energy than most people I know, and I've had two extremely healthy vegan pregnancies resulting in two very robust children.

 

My first instinct when reading your post, OP, was that you simply weren't eating enough calories. When I first cut out refined foods ten years ago, I was exhausted and had no energy for a while, and then I started making sure I just ate more. I have a huge appetite. If I eat a big salad (and I do eat a lot of greens), I still need to eat a lot of other stuff to go with it--beans, nuts, cooked veggies, fruits, grains, etc.

 

I eat quinoa with nut butter and fruit for breakfast every morning.

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Nope. I was eating lots of salad. The carbs I planned didn't work out. For instance, I had planned to have hot cereal cooked in almond milk, but as my daughter said, "It tastes like you put baby oil in it."

 

Well you know not to do that again. :lol:

 

We are carby people. We will feel awful if we sit down to a big bowl of pasta or porridge and little else, but we will be miserable if all we eat is salad. I think everybody is miserable if all they eat is salad! We usually serve cooked buckwheat, quinoa or some kind of legume. I daresay there is a raw vegan way to do that, but we're not there yet! Well, I tried sprouted buckwheat porridge and it might take a few years before I feel ready to try again. :ack2: Cooked grains and legumes for me!

 

Rosie

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