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Admitting homeschool failure -what now? LONG POST


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I know I have been MIA. To be honest, it has been a #^% of a year. I don't swear often, but I am at that point. Sickness, massive behavior problems with dd7 and my chronic depression have gotten the better of me.

 

So here it is, January 4, 2012 and I am in a HUGE homeschooling hole and I must dig us out.

 

Due to her bad PS first grade experience, I had to repeat first grade math. We are about to finish Singapore 1A (and that has even been a struggle for her... I seriously wonder what she was taught or not taught in PS!). I see no possible way that we will catch up let alone finish through Singapore 2B by June when she has to take her standardized tests for Virginia. I don't even know how, where or when I conduct those tests! I was just looking at the standards of learning (SOLs) for second grade on the Virginia website and I am about to have a panic attack. I had looked at it back last summer, but haven't revisited it since. Just another thing to make me feel like a failure. Can you tell things aren't going well? Ugh.

 

I have all but given up on SOTW, science and art. Instead, I have simply focused on the most basic of basics: math, grammar (FLL 1), handwriting and occasional Writing with Ease.

 

I honestly wouldn't be so worried if we were staying in VA, but we just found out a month ago that we are being PCSd to Oklahoma City this summer. We have decided to put our girls into private school for a number of reasons, mainly that HS truly did not work for dd7. She is beyond miserable. But the school we want to send her to has an entrance exam. Age wise, she would be entering 3rd in the fall. I am afraid she won't even qualify for entrance into 2nd, or even into the school itself.

 

I feel like I have so screwed up her education between last year and this... How will she recover? I feel like an absolute failure. I never dreamed I would be in this situation. I am a smart, usually organized and squared away woman. I need to get back on track fast, and barring doing schoolwork for 8 hours a day, which would be torture, I am not sure what to do. Please talk me off the proverbial ledge.

 

Would anyone suggest getting her set up in K12 just to catch her up? Would that even help? Has anyone been in a similar situation with half a year of homeschool nearly down the drain?

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First of all, she is young. You can catch up. It will take determination, and consistancy.

 

Plan to educate all summer. No way around it.

 

Then find out what test she will need to take, and when it is administered. Get the prep book for the test. I think there are prep books for every single academic test that exists. Use the book as the model for your priorities, and set up a schedule that gets her to the point of proficiency in each tested area. (Normally I would not recommend teaching to a test, but this is urgent and a special circumstance.)

 

For math, is Singapore a good fit for you? It's not a program that most schools use. If you can, find the second grade program for the school you are targetting, and fly through it. Add in some Quartermile math to get her solid on math facts. Also encourage her to play with fraction, decimal, and percent rods from Lakeshore and find relationships among them, for about 10 minutes a day. That will prep her for 3rd grade work fairly painlessly.

 

For ELA, if FLL is easy for you, continue it. Copywork every day. Spelling daily. None of these take very long. Encourage her to write summaries of stories and science/history that she reads. Also assign 'themes' from time to time--journal responses. Those don't have to be corrected--she needs to start getting used to getting her words down on paper.

 

I assume she reads? If not, fix that. That's job one. If so, she should read assigned reading for about 45 minutes per day--15-20 of them aloud to you so that you can make sure that she is not skipping words she doesn't know, but learning them instead.

 

Implement a serious read aloud program every single day. You read science, history, picture books, and chapter books. Make it fun! Read old-fashioned books with longer sentences, like Ramona the Brave and LWW. This will teach vocabulary and broaden her literacy.

 

That's what I would do, and I would jump all over it.

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I know I have been MIA. To be honest, it has been a #^% of a year. I don't swear often, but I am at that point. Sickness, massive behavior problems with dd7 and my chronic depression have gotten the better of me.

 

So here it is, January 4, 2012 and I am in a HUGE homeschooling hole and I must dig us out.

 

Due to her bad PS first grade experience, I had to repeat first grade math. We are about to finish Singapore 1A (and that has even been a struggle for her... I seriously wonder what she was taught or not taught in PS!). I see no possible way that we will catch up let alone finish through Singapore 2B by June when she has to take her standardized tests for Virginia. I don't even know how, where or when I conduct those tests! I was just looking at the standards of learning (SOLs) for second grade on the Virginia website and I am about to have a panic attack. I had looked at it back last summer, but haven't revisited it since. Just another thing to make me feel like a failure. Can you tell things aren't going well? Ugh.

 

I have all but given up on SOTW, science and art. Instead, I have simply focused on the most basic of basics: math, grammar (FLL 1), handwriting and occasional Writing with Ease.

 

I honestly wouldn't be so worried if we were staying in VA, but we just found out a month ago that we are being PCSd to Oklahoma City this summer. We have decided to put our girls into private school for a number of reasons, mainly that HS truly did not work for dd7. She is beyond miserable. But the school we want to send her to has an entrance exam. Age wise, she would be entering 3rd in the fall. I am afraid she won't even qualify for entrance into 2nd, or even into the school itself.

 

I feel like I have so screwed up her education between last year and this... How will she recover? I feel like an absolute failure. I never dreamed I would be in this situation. I am a smart, usually organized and squared away woman. I need to get back on track fast, and barring doing schoolwork for 8 hours a day, which would be torture, I am not sure what to do. Please talk me off the proverbial ledge.

 

Would anyone suggest getting her set up in K12 just to catch her up? Would that even help? Has anyone been in a similar situation with half a year of homeschool nearly down the drain?

 

:grouphug:

 

She has to pass a standardized test, not achieve perfection on SOL items as you, an adult, would perform mastery.

 

For 2nd grade, the Stanford Achievement Test has most of the questions read to the student. She will meet the requirement if she is at 23% on the composite of math and language arts. Social studies and science sub sections don't matter.

 

You might want to look at the CAT, which is available from Seton at a low price and a very fast turn around time. You could test her now, just to see where she really is. That would let you either put the concerns for this year to rest or know where to focus.

 

I would focus on math, reading, maybe handwriting and spelling and some snuggly mom time with some good read alouds (or audio books from the library). Sounds like you could all use the snuggling. When she is solid on reading, she will be able to master plenty of science and history.

 

Even WTM recommends putting math and reading above science and history if those skills aren't yet mastered. If she understands math and how to read and write, she ought to be able to work with the private school.

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:grouphug:

While I really liked singapore...it does not work for everyone. My dd did horrible with it, my ds did great...total different learning styles.

 

I would find out what they requirements are for where you are going and work from there. Try not to stress about it. PS teachers fail too at educating many children. We can't all be perfect, but try our best.

 

Just lay out a short term goal and get that rolling, then lay a longer term one and get that going...

 

My hubby was freaking out a bit when our son was almost 8 1/2 and still not reading well at all or interested in it at all. It turned out fine though...ds was just on his own timetable and has always been so. He now flies through books and loves them.

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:grouphug: Don't have much advice, but would most surely focus on the reading, writing, and arithmetic. I say practice, practice, and more practice when it comes to math. Find some K-2 grade math books/workbooks and focus on the basic counting, adding, subtraction, telling time, money, etc.

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Guest lahmeh

The teachers at most of the private schools around me offer tutoring after school. My kids could actually go to the classrooms to use their supplies and be taught one on one by the teacher. This is as a homeschooler and not a student. Their rates are very cheap too. Maybe you could call around?? :grouphug:

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:grouphug: I'm sorry to hear things are so rough for you. Your DD is very young and has a lot of time to catch up. My DD 8 was struggling with Singapore 1A/1B in second grade. We just kept at it over the summer (we switched to MCP and now use Rod and Staff) and she is just about where she should be in R&S now in 3rd grade. If you keep working through the summer she'll pick up a lot of ground. Also, remember that Singapore is (in the opinion of some) 1/2 to a fully grade ahead of typical US math books.

 

As far as the standardized test, at least in my state you only need to score in the 30th percentile. Even a barely proficient child should be able to reach that, especially with some practice.

 

I don't know what advice to give about the entrance exam. Perhaps explain to the school that she struggles with math. How is her reading?

 

We're in a similar position, considering private school, but my 6 y.o. (1rst grade) can't read at all. I don't see how they would take her for 2nd grade next year at her current aptitude.

 

Is repeating a grade an option, could she enter 2nd grade in the private school next year?

 

As far as your depression, :grouphug::grouphug:, just try to hang in there, take care of yourself and don't beat yourself up. Life is hard enough without putting pressure on yourself. If you have any friends/ family who can help or let you cry on their shoulder, reach out to them. A problem shared is a problem half solved.

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Guest submarines

:grouphug: :grouphug: :grouphug: They are both so, so young. They will catch up, even if you were to take an entire year completely off. There are countries where formal education doesn't even start until 7, and students perform really well later. You aren't even behind at this point.

 

If you can avoid public or private school, I'd do that and continue to homeschool. The stress of catching up now, and then the stress of the entrance exams might end just killing their love for learning.

 

When I get depressed, everything seems so incredibly bleak and I feel like a failure. I know this is tough. Try to take care of yourself, and climb out of that dark place. You little girls are learning every day, even if they might seem behind to you. :grouphug:

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Really you do! Do you know what test she will be taking for placement? If you know get a test prep book and work on that until the placement test. Keep up with reading and consider buying Teaching Textbooks interactive math IF you think she will do it.

 

Most placement tests are only reading and math. If that is the case, then you only have to get caught up with math. If not, then focus on the areas that WILL be tested.

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:grouphug:

I agree with other posters, she's young and you have time to catch up. Do you have anything like Kumon in your area? It's expensive, but might be worth tightening the belt so you can have a little peace of mind.

 

I agree. If it is stressing you out this much, see if you can get a tutor to help out.

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Don't freak out about what your child does and does not know until you find out exactly what she can do. Then work on those weaknesses to get her up to speed. Is there any way you can find out what is on that school entrance exam? Do they use a standardized test or something they've created?

 

I always thought the Singapore math was ahead of the traditional math sequence. Maybe she will do fine on the entrance exam.

 

I think you are doing fine to focus on the basics. I wouldn't feel guilty about that at all. I would be very surprised if the entrance exam has science and history/geography subjects.

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First of all, she is young. You can catch up. It will take determination, and consistancy.

 

Plan to educate all summer. No way around it.

 

Then find out what test she will need to take, and when it is administered. Get the prep book for the test. I think there are prep books for every single academic test that exists. Use the book as the model for your priorities, and set up a schedule that gets her to the point of proficiency in each tested area. (Normally I would not recommend teaching to a test, but this is urgent and a special circumstance.)

 

For math, is Singapore a good fit for you? It's not a program that most schools use. If you can, find the second grade program for the school you are targetting, and fly through it. Add in some Quartermile math to get her solid on math facts. Also encourage her to play with fraction, decimal, and percent rods from Lakeshore and find relationships among them, for about 10 minutes a day. That will prep her for 3rd grade work fairly painlessly.

 

For ELA, if FLL is easy for you, continue it. Copywork every day. Spelling daily. None of these take very long. Encourage her to write summaries of stories and science/history that she reads. Also assign 'themes' from time to time--journal responses. Those don't have to be corrected--she needs to start getting used to getting her words down on paper.

 

I assume she reads? If not, fix that. That's job one. If so, she should read assigned reading for about 45 minutes per day--15-20 of them aloud to you so that you can make sure that she is not skipping words she doesn't know, but learning them instead.

 

Implement a serious read aloud program every single day. You read science, history, picture books, and chapter books. Make it fun! Read old-fashioned books with longer sentences, like Ramona the Brave and LWW. This will teach vocabulary and broaden her literacy.

 

That's what I would do, and I would jump all over it.

 

 

:iagree: First of all, relax. Panic and tears get us nowhere.

Sit down tonight and find out where you need to be and by when,then figure out a daily plan.

 

 

Focus on the stuff you need to be tested on first (the first test) then move on to the other test requirements.

 

Stick to it.

You may find out that you are better at this that you thought.

 

Lara

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Work with her on math fact cards...increase her speed...we keep them laminated and run through them until they can answer 200 math facts in under 5 minutes...or cut their time in half, if it takes her 8 minutes to complete 200 facts, work on lowering that by half...it's fun, you make fun of it by crazy faces..and give rewards when she gets them down! :)

 

Manipulatives...fractions etc. pie pieces etc.

 

Read aloud and have discussions, make sure her reading comprehension/listening skills are strong..pick fun books to read aloud as a family!

Five Little Peppers and How they Grew

The Princess and the Goblin

Heidi

Little House on the Prairie books

all were faves at that age

 

Just focus on reading/writing/comprehension/math...all the rest will come naturally from their interests! :)

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I'd go ahead and test her with the CAT test from Seton. It is inexpensive (as tests go) at under $30. I expect she will not have an unacceptable score in math for that test because, honestly, the math on that test is very, very easy. If she does, then you can retake the test in May and submit those scores. If you are planning to put her in school and are moving, it really doesn't matter if she passes that test of not. It will have no bearing on the future.

 

Then call the school you want her in and find out what test they use and what they want the kids doing. Get a list. Tell them your plan to enroll and find out what she is lacking and make catching those areas up your primary goal.

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I know in Virginia you just need to use a Nationally normed standardized test. You can administer it yourself. I agree with the poster who suggested getting the Cat-E from Seton and testing her now w/ the second grade test. If she passes (4th Stanine, I believe) then you can relax about the Va. tests. I am pretty sure you could submit the results at the end of the school year. If she doesn't, you will know where she has problems.

 

The Language Arts of the Standardized tests focus on noticing punctuation and cap mistakes and on noticing misspelled words It really helps a lot to get a prep book to help them "get" what to do. Then you can use the prep book examples to make your own examples.

 

For math I would concentrate on making sure she has her adding and subtracting facts down, understands place value and knows how to add and subtract with regrouping. If she has these down she will be able to pass the test. While I like Singapore, I, too, would recommend getting a standard text book (you can get old Addison Wesley or Scott Foresman grade 2 workbooks for a song on Amazon. You don't need the teacher's manual for these) and working through the sections that she needs to work on.

 

Ideally, I do agree that it would be a good idea to get a copy of the math text used in the school.

 

Mostly, relax and just do the next thing. THere is a HUGE range of skills/abilities in the K-3 crew (I taught 1st and 2nd grade in an excellent school before kids and I have seen "late bloomers" catch up in a matter of weeks.)

 

Deep breath,

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Since her reading is above par, I would continue what you are doing: focus on FLL, WWE and Math and work diligently at least 4 days per week. Since she is beyond miserable, I would work to give her at least one day per week of something she enjoys, whether that is SOTW (even just reading one chapter per week is more history than many ps students get), science or art. Remember that even while you focus on academics, she is a person you are attempting to build a lifelong relationship with. This means investing in giving her enjoyable experiences, too.

 

When I had a child who was behind in Math, Singapore was a really poor fit. I would get a conventional grade 2 math program, a workbook-type program from a local bookstore that looks appealing, such as Spectrum or Math Made Easy. Or you could even have her take the Teaching Textbooks 3 placement test: if that fits, plug her into that ASAP and work diligently until she takes the entrance exam for the private school.

 

You can do this. You have not ruined her. Baby steps, every day. (((hugs)))

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If worse comes to worse, Oklahoma is an awesome state to homeschool in--no requirements really at all! And if you're coming to Tinker, there's an active homeschooling group at Tinker. It might be nice to keep her home for one year, switch up curric and catch her up before putting her in that private school.

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I agree with what other people have said here. Singapore is about a grade ahead. Look into Kumon.

 

Kumon isn't a traditional tutoring program. Kumon is all about increasing speed and fluency and building confidence. This means that the child's mind isn't bogged down with the procedures, can finish their basic work quickly, and there is room in their mind to understand the higher stuff when they get there. It seems like that kind of thing would help her out greatly, and doing the regular Kumon program would be the most efficient way to get there.

 

If you are reluctant, then focus on facts and fluency, instead of the higher level stuff in Singapore. I used Rod and Staff to do this with my kids. The basic idea, if someone is "behind," is to have them work where it is easy and slowly build from there. That's what Kumon does (so if they have her do beginning exercises that are waaay too easy for her, don't despair! They have a reason for what they do!) Working on easy stuff builds speed and confidence, and they add to that as they progress.

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:grouphug:

 

Is your depression improving? Is it under control? I would start there. An improvement in your depression would help your outlook and your ability to make progress with your DD--more than any other change you could make.

 

I agree with those who have suggested sticking to basics and even getting a tutor.

 

:grouphug:

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Put your oxygen mask on first. Then work on just the basics - reading (sounds like that is going great!), writing, and arithemitic. My dd did well with Singapore Math, but my ds needed Math-U-See. Flash cards will help make it fun and help learn the basics. It will be okay - believe me - I've been there and my kids are high school now!

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One other quick suggestion re: math: Rightstart. It's where I retreated from singapore, with my non-math-intuitive child. Start her in level B. She will understand math very well. Also-if you are moving, what if she totally bombs the test? Can anything bad really happen?

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ITA with finding out what the school uses. The classical school here uses Saxon, and Saxon 2 is very similar to Singapore 1 as far as topics go. It may be that she's right on schedule for where she'll need to be next year and that if you continue on, you'll be fine.

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The school is a unique hybrid school: 2days in class classical, 3 days home school. Utilizes WTM method for much of the curriculum. SWB is speaking there this spring. It is rigorous.

 

If you're talking about Veritas, they use an accelerated Saxon schedule for math, so your third grader will actually be in 5/4. I would take the Saxon diagnostic test and see where she is right now (that's probably what Veritas will use for placement anyway).

 

It's a great school that I highly respect and when we started a school last year in central Texas they were very helpful and we've incorporated many of their books.

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If you're talking about Veritas, they use an accelerated Saxon schedule for math, so your third grader will actually be in 5/4. I would take the Saxon diagnostic test and see where she is right now (that's probably what Veritas will use for placement anyway).

 

It's a great school that I highly respect and when we started a school last year in central Texas they were very helpful and we've incorporated many of their books.

 

It is Veritas and regarding accellerated Saxon? now I am doubly nervous.:blink:

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Put your oxygen mask on first. Then work on just the basics - reading (sounds like that is going great!), writing, and arithemitic. My dd did well with Singapore Math, but my ds needed Math-U-See. Flash cards will help make it fun and help learn the basics. It will be okay - believe me - I've been there and my kids are high school now!

 

That school has a great website. They recognize the ITBS, so I'd use that for testing. They list Saxon 5/4 for third grade, so I'd work a lot on math facts for the four operations and ditch Singapore. Math mammoth would probably let you catch up quicker.

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It is Veritas and regarding accellerated Saxon? now I am doubly nervous.:blink:

 

I just looked and all of the curriculum, scope and sequence, etc. is on the Veritas website. That should give you a concrete goal.

 

Here is the K-3 Saxon math placement test.

 

Here is the the 5/4-Algebra 1/2 placement test.

 

There is a huge jump between them.

 

The website says they use the ITBS for admissions and your student needs to score at the 50th percentile or above. It also says you can turn in test scores as opposed to having them test your child. You might want to run an ITBS and see how she does now. It may be that all of your worrying is for naught.

 

She will be fine. You will do great. It will all be fine.

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I sent my dd to a school very much like you are describing. Several students there would go down or up a grade level for certain subjects. Maybe you could talk to someone in the administration about your situation and see if it would be possible for your dd to go down a level just in math with the goal of hopefully catching her up sometime that year.

 

I would switch her now to whatever math she will be using at her new school. Give her the placement test and then just do as much as you can with her from now until the fall. That way you know what she will be expected to know on the school entrance exam, and she will already be used to the way their program works, which is important for someone who does not take to math easily.

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I don't know how school adverse or welcoming your daughter is, but how about initially placing her in 2nd grade instead of 3rd? This would be the same as if she started kindergarten at age 6 instead of 5 - very acceptable. Then if she excels, you can always bump her up a grade, built in success instead of a worry about struggling. Just an idea.

 

I, too, have missed you and wondered where you were. Sorry about the tough year. May you be blessed in your new home.

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something to think about grade wise is that she doesn't have to go into third. My son turned 6 in november and he is correctly placed into kindergarten in our state. The cut off date here (ohio) is to turn 5 by sep 30, which he did not last year, so he is in his correct grade (not red-shirted). So he would turn 7 in first grade. Just to mention that kids can be a variety of ages (appropriately) in each grade. I don't know when your daughters birthday is but in your new state she might be a legitamite 2nd grader next year. Just something to look into :grouphug:

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How about picking up:

 

1) Miquon Orange & Red (and the instrucional books and rods)

 

and

 

2) Peggy Kaye's Game for Math

 

Then:

 

Spend 20 min a day (about one exercise) in Singapore Math

Spend 20 min a day on Miquon

Spend 20 min a day playing math games from the games book

Spend 10 min a day drilling facts using triangle flashcards or similar drill items

 

DO THESE MATH TASKS SPREAD THROUGHOUT THE DAY, NOT all at once.

 

Then, spend an hour reading (her to you, and you to her)

 

That's 2hr10min a day of mandatory school. Anything you add is bonus, and will have little effect on standardized testing at this age.

 

BTW, in VA, atleast 8 years ago, you can self-adminster standardized tests. I used the CAT test. You buy it online, administer it, then mail it in for grading, then they send you a grade report.

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OK, with the new information, I would switch her to Saxon immediately. I'll bet she could handle Saxon 3. FYI, all of the Saxon books start off very gently and convey a lot of new material at the end, so you could maybe start with the last 10 lessons of the prior year (ask here; I'll bet someone has an old Saxon book they could send you cheaply). Of course, do the placement test, but be wise about interpreting it.

 

I want to reiterate getting Quartermile Math. It's a computer program where the children competes with herself to develop speed and proficiency in math facts. You don't have to oversee it much--just assign 15 minutes of it every day in addition to your other math work. I strongly encourage you to get it right away--that will give her a huge leg up no matter what you do next year.

 

It is wonderful that she is reading so well, and I think that you could play the SOTW CD's in the background in the car or at home and call history good. You might want to discuss some chapter book she likes with her, to start to familiarize her with literature discussions, but at that age the literary terms are not in heavy use yet. Nothing to worry about there!

 

So the concern is mostly math, and I would do it 6 days per week, and do two lessons per day when you can fit them in or when they are easy, until you get caught up. I think that you have a very good shot at this--great job!

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OK, with the new information, I would switch her to Saxon immediately. I'll bet she could handle Saxon 3. FYI, all of the Saxon books start off very gently and convey a lot of new material at the end, so you could maybe start with the last 10 lessons of the prior year (ask here; I'll bet someone has an old Saxon book they could send you cheaply). Of course, do the placement test, but be wise about interpreting it.

 

I want to reiterate getting Quartermile Math. It's a computer program where the children competes with herself to develop speed and proficiency in math facts. You don't have to oversee it much--just assign 15 minutes of it every day in addition to your other math work. I strongly encourage you to get it right away--that will give her a huge leg up no matter what you do next year.

 

It is wonderful that she is reading so well, and I think that you could play the SOTW CD's in the background in the car or at home and call history good. You might want to discuss some chapter book she likes with her, to start to familiarize her with literature discussions, but at that age the literary terms are not in heavy use yet. Nothing to worry about there!

 

So the concern is mostly math, and I would do it 6 days per week, and do two lessons per day when you can fit them in or when they are easy, until you get caught up. I think that you have a very good shot at this--great job!

:iagree: if you are using a school that implements Saxon, don't add extra programs in and muddy things further.

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:grouphug:

 

Is your depression improving? Is it under control? I would start there. An improvement in your depression would help your outlook and your ability to make progress with your DD--more than any other change you could make.

 

I agree with those who have suggested sticking to basics and even getting a tutor.

 

:grouphug:

 

 

This. Is the depression treated with meds, therapy, or both? Lack of consistency and follow through is part of depression, which feeds the homeschooling issue, which feeds the depression.

 

I'm also wondering if perfectionism is part of this picture (and can be tied to depression). Not being able to do something completely "right", for a perfectionist, often leads to not doing anything.

 

 

 

The school is a unique hybrid school: 2days in class classical, 3 days home school. Utilizes WTM method for much of the curriculum. SWB is speaking there this spring. It is rigorous.

 

I teach in a school that has this option (university style). With 3 days in which you are still responsible, and at her young age, being on top of the depression is going to be essential.

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:grouphug:

 

She has to pass a standardized test, not achieve perfection on SOL items as you, an adult, would perform mastery.

 

For 2nd grade, the Stanford Achievement Test has most of the questions read to the student. She will meet the requirement if she is at 23% on the composite of math and language arts. Social studies and science sub sections don't matter.

 

You might want to look at the CAT, which is available from Seton at a low price and a very fast turn around time. You could test her now, just to see where she really is. That would let you either put the concerns for this year to rest or know where to focus.

 

I would focus on math, reading, maybe handwriting and spelling and some snuggly mom time with some good read alouds (or audio books from the library). Sounds like you could all use the snuggling. When she is solid on reading, she will be able to master plenty of science and history.

 

Even WTM recommends putting math and reading above science and history if those skills aren't yet mastered. If she understands math and how to read and write, she ought to be able to work with the private school.

 

:iagree:

7 is such a young age to declare failure. She is still just a little one. Math, reading and handwriting...consistently....day by day....will get her further than anything else. Snuggle up and read pretty picture books, rhymey books, lovely sounding books. Don't be so hard on yourself....homeschooling, and education for that matter, is a marathon, not a sprint...

 

Faithe

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How about picking up:

 

1) Miquon Orange & Red (and the instrucional books and rods)

 

and

 

2) Peggy Kaye's Game for Math

 

Then:

 

Spend 20 min a day (about one exercise) in Singapore Math

Spend 20 min a day on Miquon

Spend 20 min a day playing math games from the games book

Spend 10 min a day drilling facts using triangle flashcards or similar drill items

 

DO THESE MATH TASKS SPREAD THROUGHOUT THE DAY, NOT all at once.

 

Then, spend an hour reading (her to you, and you to her)

 

That's 2hr10min a day of mandatory school. Anything you add is bonus, and will have little effect on standardized testing at this age.

 

BTW, in VA, atleast 8 years ago, you can self-adminster standardized tests. I used the CAT test. You buy it online, administer it, then mail it in for grading, then they send you a grade report.

 

 

We're already using rods after our failed attempt at Miquon (kinder). We switched to Singapore kindergarten (I can't remember what it called) and she devoured the workbook so we stuck with it for this year? The rods seem to help but unless I tell her exactly what to do with them, she is literally clueless. I simply can not figure out what this girl's learning style is when it comes to math.

We also used a lot of kumon in kinder, and she ate it up. Are the Kumon math workbooks that you can buy in amazon and at B&N etc. the same that they use in the tutoring centers? Are they adequate as a curriculum? I really don't want to become a serial curriculum switcher, but if they worked two years ago, maybe they would work now.

 

I am definitely switching, regardless. I it obvious that Singapore is not working for her.

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