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Starting 1st grade tomorrow


kristinannie
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I am starting 1st grade tomorrow. We are doing SM1a and NOEO Bio. He is definitely in at least the 1st grade as far as reading level, but we are just going to continue that normally along with the handwriting he is used to (we are almost through the K book). I am stepping things up a little bit. We are going to do a little more formal schooling and also start learning German.

 

I am not sure what to tell DS5. I am thinking that I won't say anything and that we will "start" first grade this summer like we started K last summer. We will just continue from where we are at. The wording isn't that important to me. I am also not wanting him to tell all his friends that he is in first grade since that would be awkward.

 

At what point do kids start to realize that they are accelerated? My son has no point of reference really because he is homeschooling and is my oldest. When he has playdates, it isn't like they discuss school.

 

I just thought I would post on here and get some advice. I am sure he is going to get more and more ahead, especially in math. This is a kid who literally does multiplication in his head even though I have never taught this to him. What is the best way to handle this? Thanks so much!

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...At what point do kids start to realize that they are accelerated? My son has no point of reference really because he is homeschooling and is my oldest. When he has playdates, it isn't like they discuss school.

 

I just thought I would post on here and get some advice. I am sure he is going to get more and more ahead, especially in math. This is a kid who literally does multiplication in his head even though I have never taught this to him. What is the best way to handle this? Thanks so much!

 

Better to not say anything now in my humble opinion. He isn't aware of what it means and I'd leave it at that. This gives you enough wiggle room if you think you need to review K at some point (not saying you will, but always good to have that flexibility without hurting his feelings).

 

Skipping a year or two might not make a huge difference in the elementary years. Once it starts to become very obvious that he's several grades ahead, I'd start being more open with him about it because believe me, he will be aware by then.

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Better to not say anything now in my humble opinion. He isn't aware of what it means and I'd leave it at that. This gives you enough wiggle room if you think you need to review K at some point (not saying you will, but always good to have that flexibility without hurting his feelings).

 

Skipping a year or two might not make a huge difference in the elementary years. Once it starts to become very obvious that he's several grades ahead, I'd start being more open with him about it because believe me, he will be aware by then.

 

 

Well said. This is exactly what I am thinking. I don't want to make it a big thing, but we are starting a lot of new stuff. Thanks for all of your responses!

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My oldest is also somewhat ahead. She was actually under the impression that she was in first grade and I had to correct her and tell her Kindergarten came first. (She had naturally assumed that one begins school in grade one.) This spring, I will probably add in science/history/more language one piece at a time until we get to a full-fledged first grade set of curric, but there is no point in telling her that she is ahead. She is already acutely aware that a lot of her agemates don't read and do math like she does.

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I tell my son that he's in the grade he's supposed to be in by age, but he knows he's working ahead in multiple subjects. You kind of can't miss the number on the book sometimes. ;) If asked what grade he's in, he'll tell you 2nd grade. If you were to ask what grade math he was working in, he'd tell you 4th grade. It really hasn't been an issue here. I don't talk much about what grades he's working in, and I don't say, "Wow, you're in 4th grade math already!" or any other such thing to get him puffed up. It's very nonchalant. I also haven't talked about his reading level to him, so he doesn't know what reading level he's at (technically, I don't either, but I've given him 7th grade books that he read and comprehended with ease... and he's read some adult history with comprehension, so it's certainly up there).

 

It also helps that he starts books at various times in the year, so it's not like he's doing everything in a particular grade level at xyz time.

 

My middle son started "K" in October, but we don't work every day (or even every week), and I've been calling it "K4", since he's technically "K" next year. So next year I'll say he's "K5", even if we're doing Singapore or Math Mammoth 1. I don't expect him to be very ahead yet. He's quite different from his big brother. Granted, he may surprise me. The kid who had to be explicitly taught to count 1-10 at age 4 is now coming up with addition facts on his own and finding correlations between the facts (ie, 8+2=10, and hey, that's the same as 5+5!). This child is "wired differently" though, so I just don't know what's going on his head. :D

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I'd leave him at his age grade unless you see he's accelerated in all subjects and has the maturity to focus on longer tasks. Ds and dd have shown great math and reading aptitude but their emotional maturity would make a grade skip difficult. Anyways, I don't intend on the kids going away to college until 18 so I'm in no hurry to graduate them.

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I'd leave him at his age grade unless you see he's accelerated in all subjects and has the maturity to focus on longer tasks. Ds and dd have shown great math and reading aptitude but their emotional maturity would make a grade skip difficult. Anyways, I don't intend on the kids going away to college until 18 so I'm in no hurry to graduate them.

 

 

I don't plan on sending him to college early either! I don't think we can ever run out of things to learn!

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I tell my son that he's in the grade he's supposed to be in by age, but he knows he's working ahead in multiple subjects.

 

Same here. My kids equate grade levels with age. They move on to the next grade the next school year, but realize that it has nothing to do with the level of work they are doing.

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My oldest daughter was 14 months old when we adopted her from Korea. I knew after the first night we were a family that she was not your typical 14 month old. I have nicknamed her my old soul. She is far beyond her years emotionally and intellectually.

 

I *tried* kinder level work with her and it lasted us a whole month and a half. She was through Singapore Essentials B in 5 weeks and we also did extra RightStart lessons. We started Singapore 1A in November and she is more then half way through it. She isn't rushing, but math (and everything else) comes naturally to her. The only thing that slows her down is the Challenging Word Problems books. She is reading at a 2nd/3rd grade level and she flew through the 1st grade Veritas Press phonics program.

 

I am running with it and letting her go at her own pace. We have zero intentions of sending her to college early, but she can certainly do online classes at home. She is a beautiful, exotic looking little girl with a personality to match and there is no way I would want her around college age boys at 16 :tongue_smilie:

 

Personally I would let him go at his own pace. There is always something else to learn.

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I would like a good book or two on raising or teaching gifted children. I see a lot of the personality traits that I had as a child popping up in my son and a lot of those led to me being a lazy perfectionist (i.e. if I didn't think I could do it perfectly, why do it?). I would really like to have more information. I have read on this board that gifted children are almost like special needs children because there is a lot of extra work involved. I would love to hear some book suggestions. I went on Amazon and there were way too many choices!

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