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Teachin'Mine

An open invitation to all the moms of 8th graders ...

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Checking in also. My biggest fears are not academic but social. I haven't figured out how to exactly word my concerns' date=' but I do have them.

 

As far as academics, I don't know any home schoolers IRL who set the bar very high. I am very glad for the resource of the WTM forums to help me know how to do this.[/quote']

 

Blossom'sGirl...I could've written your post. It's the social concerns for my very SHY dd that have me concerned. Most everyone we have known on our homeschooling journey thus far (9yrs) has now sent their kids to school, some private, some public. Any others still out there just don't seem to have the same ambitions and believe in the potential that we feel our dc have. So, if we homeschool, we really will be going it ALONE and that's what frightens me most. I love this board and am eternally grateful for the info found here, but there's nothing like sharing things IRL with other sojourners....KWIM??!!

 

Jennifer

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Blossom'sGirl...I could've written your post. It's the social concerns for my very SHY dd that have me concerned. Most everyone we have known on our homeschooling journey thus far (9yrs) has now sent their kids to school, some private, some public. Any others still out there just don't seem to have the same ambitions and believe in the potential that we feel our dc have. So, if we homeschool, we really will be going it ALONE and that's what frightens me most. I love this board and am eternally grateful for the info found here, but there's nothing like sharing things IRL with other sojourners....KWIM??!!

 

Jennifer

 

This has been our "issue". Friends, going through a local parent partnership program, having about 1/4 the work of my now 10th grader and 8th grader. It annoys my daughter (okay and me :glare:) to hear how their friends will complain about nothing to do for a few hours each day. I tell her (and me) that each family has their own priorities, blah, blah, blah. Anyway, I am grateful for these boards as well, because admittedly it is tough not to be able to share with someone IRL.

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I'm here too. My oldest starts 9th grade in the fall.

 

I've started reading. I've started planning. We recently moved to a small town, and I really miss the opportunities we had in the Houston metroplex area. I think I will have to develop opportunities myself. Biology isn't my strong point, but I'm thinking of spending my summer re-studying and arranging a group lab.

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Not a mom of an 8th grader... but I peek in here once in awhile to read up on what's what. I'm one of those planners...I plan long term and then I can go back and tweak. I pretty much have through 8th grade solidly planned... high school is a bit more sketchy, but I have a year before I really need to get serious about 9th grade ;D

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Our oldest ds is in 8th grade. Honestly, I get a little sick to my stomach when I think of high school! Ds does not like school at all. He would much rather be working outdoors. His ideal job--being a major league pitcher. Hey, it could happen! :001_smile: Whatever he does, he will definitely end up working with his hands. My focus is to get him to graduate high school, not college prep. We've had to slow down in some subjects to make sure he is understanding. It makes me nervous when I think about it because my goal in high school was to get to college and good grades were so easy for me. I would like him prepared for college but since we have to work so hard just to get the basics down that all the talk of extras and test scores get me worried.

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I sincerely hope that 13 is not a very indicative age to judge a child's future potential. My dd has of late developed a debilitating case of princess-itis. I am hoping it passes by this fall. Because as of this date, she seems best suited to be a professional diva.

 

I fear that we have not been rigorous enough. Dd has not yet developed any particular area of interest, and may not ever do so. She is much like my dh. They are completely content to just drift along. Drives me crazy. They like everything a little bit, but have no overwhelming passion for anything.

 

In recent years we had been doing portfolio review to meet our state homeschool requirements. But this year I think we will do a standardized test because I would like to know where we stand comparatively, going into high school.

 

Our situation is a little different, since dh works at a local state university. Dd will most likely go there because of the tuition remission program. However, I do want to have a strong homeschool program in case her plans change. I think I will call and talk to an admissions counselor at the univ. to see what they have to say about what they would expect to see from an applicant in her situation.

 

We may do some PSEO (college classes during high school) for her Jr. and Sr. years. But after reading a past thread about cc classes, I was glad to find that the univ. participates in the program also and that dd could take her classes there where she would later seek her 4yr degree instead of at the cc.

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Well, I have no problem planning and thinking about high school, I just don't know how I can endure getting my 2 boys there! This middle school garbage is driving me nuts!

 

Really, I am having fun with planning HS. It doesn't intimidate me at all.

 

But the reality of it is too weird. How did my kids grow up this fast?

 

Ohio has a weird (but awesome) HS credit thing called "flex-credit" which has me keeping records starting now (my oldest is 7th/8th, my second 6th- but both do various level work, depending on subject) as I can have things count towards HS credit outside of Carnegie unit stuff. I plan on utilizing flex credit in the "official" 10th grade & possibly 11th grade years, where I will enroll them in the local PS district virtual academy, do maybe one class there, the rest with PSEO and flex credit the rest. I plan on issuing my own awesome home school transcript. I feel that it puts you in a different category from the get-go.

 

I appreciate the welcome. Better to be invited than crash the party!

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I have once in awhile come over here, but I must admit that I am very intimidated.

 

My biggest fear is how do I put together a really good writing program that will help him to write more. I have some ideas. I have to pray about this one. I am nervous.

 

Happy New Year!

 

Sincerely,

Karen

http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/testimony

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I am here.

 

I have to confess, my every thought these days is about what our high school plans will be. I am not afraid to hs high school for a few years until she is old enough to take courses at the cc, but dd is not overly academically ambitious and I do have trouble keeping her accountable while schooling the other 3 kids. For these reasons I am considering some other options for high school. Possibly the local private, or there is the possibility of a new charter high school starting in town but it's is up in the air yet as whether it will be a go---this is my first pick. It is supposed to be modeled after an existing non-traditional charter in another part of the state that has been highly successful and looks fabulous online. If these 2 options don't pan out I might consider Classical Conversations, but starting this late in the game might be difficult. A last ditch option is to go to the local ps part time and hs the rest. The local ps is a social cesspool with a 40% graduation rate, but a few classes carefully selected might be okay. Outside accountability would be great, positive peer pressure would be great, less work for me keeping her on track constantly....awesome. I could do it at home, but for this child, I honestly think it would be better if she didn't.

 

Praying God gives us wisdom, clarity, and peace in what he has in store for our dd. Praying the same for all of you.

 

I will not freak out. I will NOT freak out. I WILL NOT freak out. :willy_nilly::scared:

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Busted. :tongue_smilie:

 

Ok, here are the particulars ....

 

Smart but unmotivated teen boy

Likes history and science

Likes computers

Not a fan of math

 

 

 

 

Do you have my son???? LOL. Mine is 7th grade, so I'm still really a lurker. Whew!

 

We're enjoying reading more about Covenant after your posts and Creekland's responses.

 

Back to lurkdom....:leaving:

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If anything you all better be worried that I AM HERE! LOL I have been bugging you guys since last spring. :lol:

 

Notice that it was "bugs" who posted right after you? :lol:

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This has been our "issue". Friends, going through a local parent partnership program, having about 1/4 the work of my now 10th grader and 8th grader. It annoys my daughter (okay and me :glare:) to hear how their friends will complain about nothing to do for a few hours each day. I tell her (and me) that each family has their own priorities, blah, blah, blah. Anyway, I am grateful for these boards as well, because admittedly it is tough not to be able to share with someone IRL.

 

That's part of why I hang out here so much. It's very frustrating for both of us how little time others spend on their homeschooling, and how often they try to convince us that what we're doing is a waste of time. :glare: Even though we know other homeschoolers, it still feels like we're alone in what we're doing - except here. :)

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Our oldest ds is in 8th grade. Honestly, I get a little sick to my stomach when I think of high school! Ds does not like school at all. He would much rather be working outdoors. His ideal job--being a major league pitcher. Hey, it could happen! :001_smile: Whatever he does, he will definitely end up working with his hands. My focus is to get him to graduate high school, not college prep. We've had to slow down in some subjects to make sure he is understanding. It makes me nervous when I think about it because my goal in high school was to get to college and good grades were so easy for me. I would like him prepared for college but since we have to work so hard just to get the basics down that all the talk of extras and test scores get me worried.

 

I think it's great that you know your son so well. :) There's nothing wrong with covering the basics. With that, he'll still have doors open to him if he should choose to continue his education. There are lots of hands-on jobs for which people are in demand. For some of them, a training program, certificate, or two year degree is really helpful and gives their starting income a boost and opens up advancement opportunities.

 

I wouldn't worry about test scores at all at this point, but I'd also keep in mind that a lot can change in 4 or 5 years and a struggling junior high student can become a serious junior/senior.

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Well, I have no problem planning and thinking about high school, I just don't know how I can endure getting my 2 boys there! This middle school garbage is driving me nuts!

 

Really, I am having fun with planning HS. It doesn't intimidate me at all.

 

But the reality of it is too weird. How did my kids grow up this fast?

 

Ohio has a weird (but awesome) HS credit thing called "flex-credit" which has me keeping records starting now (my oldest is 7th/8th, my second 6th- but both do various level work, depending on subject) as I can have things count towards HS credit outside of Carnegie unit stuff. I plan on utilizing flex credit in the "official" 10th grade & possibly 11th grade years, where I will enroll them in the local PS district virtual academy, do maybe one class there, the rest with PSEO and flex credit the rest. I plan on issuing my own awesome home school transcript. I feel that it puts you in a different category from the get-go.

 

I appreciate the welcome. Better to be invited than crash the party!

 

I think the same just about every day.

 

 

You're welcome! :) Crashing works too - it's how I came here. :lol:

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I have once in awhile come over here, but I must admit that I am very intimidated.

 

My biggest fear is how do I put together a really good writing program that will help him to write more. I have some ideas. I have to pray about this one. I am nervous.

 

Happy New Year!

 

Sincerely,

Karen

www.homeschoolblogger.com/testimony

 

Your thread title says it all!!! :lol:

 

About the writing, you can always post a thread specifically about the writing and bounce your ideas off of others. I'm sure others have tried some of the same things and can give you some feedback. I think it's good to be nervous because that means that you care and want to do the best you can. Prayer is always good! :001_smile:

 

Happy New Year Karen!!!

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I have many concerns. Regarding staying home: lack of academic motivation, (and I want him to have a college prep curricula), distracting his other 2 brothers, and just having a negative attitude in general (which seems to affect everyone), cost of high school, social outlets. Regarding brick and mortar: lack of academic motivation ;), peers (pressure and dependence), and a general negative experience with sitting in the classroom, tedious homework, and the inability to make his own choices (just kind of following along):sad:

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This is has been helpful to me since I've been trying to plan out 8th - high school since this last summer. My son is in 7th this year but I'm trying to lay a firm foundation this year to build on as far as some study habits and routines-it's a work in progress :glare:

We are not aiming for AP classes or elite schools. Likely path with be tech school or community college to start then state college. I could see him owning a karate school or doing construction-how's that for diversity? ;)

 

Does anyone know where I can get one of the free on-line career/aptitude assessments?

I don't want to use one without a reference/review because I'm afraid of spyware and tons of junkmail if I use one from a google search!

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I'm here.....tardy as usual :D .

 

My fears vary depending on what we're struggling with at any given time. Right now it's history. We're using TOG, but for my 8th grader it may just be too much reading. I really don't want to give it up but I have to remember there are many ways to accomplish history and I need to do what works best for him. I'll be trying to figure this out over the next quarter.

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My daughter is in 8th grade, and I've just started lurking here on the high school board. She is dyslexic, so I will be doing things a little differently, but I still want to give her a quality high school education and prepare her for whatever she wants to do. I love the experience and wisdom here!

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I'm here too. I've been lurking on this board for a year, so I think I need to take the plunge. I have a 7th grader this year, but I'm planning 8th grade as if it is high school in case she wants to graduate early. Right now, she is adamant about staying put, but she might change her mind when she is older. (She has the test scores to do it.) I was going to use six years of Omnibus, but now I think that I will go the AP route with my own plans. (Yikes!) I will need lots of input for that! I was pretty confident about home schooling up until this year, but now I'm terrified that I will ruin her chances of getting into a top college.

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I'm here too. I've been lurking on this board for a year, so I think I need to take the plunge. I have a 7th grader this year, but I'm planning 8th grade as if it is high school in case she wants to graduate early. Right now, she is adamant about staying put, but she might change her mind when she is older. (She has the test scores to do it.) I was going to use six years of Omnibus, but now I think that I will go the AP route with my own plans. (Yikes!) I will need lots of input for that! I was pretty confident about home schooling up until this year, but now I'm terrified that I will ruin her chances of getting into a top college.

 

For what it's worth, she definitely doesn't have to graduate early just because she has the scores to get into a top college. My middle son could have done that. He was even being contacted by colleges (not top ones though) asking if he wanted to do that. However, he's enjoyed his "normal" time through high school with 4 years on the Chess Team and in youth groups and other assorted things. He didn't want to be pushed (but probably could have if we'd pushed it). There's a bit to be said for social maturity that comes with age.

 

BUT, I know others can choose differently and what works for them works too. I just wanted to let you know you wouldn't be the only one who had a high scoring student who wanted to stay home until the more traditional time.

 

Also, for top colleges, be sure she distinguishes herself in more than just academics. Pretty much ALL the applicants to top colleges have the academics/scores, etc. They tend to look for "something else" to make them stand out. Homeschooling gives you plenty of opportunities.

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Here are my 9th grade and up plans..have a 10th grader, 8th grader and 7th grader...

 

Math: Saxon 1/2 in 7th grade, Foerster's Algebra 1 in 8th grade, Chalkerian's Geometry in 9th grade, Foerster's Algebra 2 in 9th grade, Pre-cal through University of Alabama's Early College (for those who will most likely be non-math majors)

 

English/Writing: Used IEW (SWI, SICC, Medieval Lit and now create my own curricula using various lesson ideas from AP English teacher sites...strong focus on English Lit/American Lit and books most often used on the AP English Exam...in depth study on poetry..thanks to AP teacher sites, precis, essays (8 forms), timed essays, synthesis essays etc.

 

Analytical Grammar for all grammar...love this program for 7th-10th

 

Foreign Language...using all 5 levels of Rosetta Stone for most of it, then their Junior/Senior year focusing on a grammar/writing course...also just found out about www.livemocha.com I think the kids and I will have fun with this!

 

Sciences...Earth Science, Physical Science, Biology, Chemistry, PHysics, AP BIology, Human Anatomy (those are 7th-12th)

 

Art...Studying the Masters...we go through 3 books studying the top 100 artists of all times and the kids try to recreate them and we discuss them...

 

Economics...http://www.fee.org son went to their week seminar and all the work leading up to it I counted toward his grade.

 

History...World History in 9th, American History in 10th and two history courses from UofA Early college

 

Extracurricular: Speech & Debate, Irish Dancing, Rowing, Scouts...

 

I'm sure I have forgotten something..but that's our basic layout!

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I found some programs through the community college that laid out all the course work for a 2 yr degree that my son is interested in (even though it's early yet I know).

I called an acquaintance with this same job and asked her about the degree and if it was enough for similar jobs. Her son went through the same program and enjoyed it very much. She was able to give me lots of feedback and told me which 4 yr colleges this 2 yr degree would transfer to (1 private and 1 state college that she knew of).

I feel like this really helps me focus on how to plan his science and math for the next 5 years. Even if he doesn't do this exact program I'm sure he'll do something similar.

 

Now if I can just get his writing skills up to par......

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I will have a high schooler next year too! Well, probably anyhow. She is trying to get into boarding school. If (and it is a big if) that works out, I guess I'll be off the hook.

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For what it's worth, she definitely doesn't have to graduate early just because she has the scores to get into a top college. My middle son could have done that. He was even being contacted by colleges (not top ones though) asking if he wanted to do that. However, he's enjoyed his "normal" time through high school with 4 years on the Chess Team and in youth groups and other assorted things. He didn't want to be pushed (but probably could have if we'd pushed it). There's a bit to be said for social maturity that comes with age.

 

BUT, I know others can choose differently and what works for them works too. I just wanted to let you know you wouldn't be the only one who had a high scoring student who wanted to stay home until the more traditional time.

 

 

Honestly, I'm hoping that we don't accelerate. I'm remembering my senior year of public high school which was a complete waste of time. Since we are homeschooling, we have many great options for that last year.

 

 

Also, for top colleges, be sure she distinguishes herself in more than just academics. Pretty much ALL the applicants to top colleges have the academics/scores, etc. They tend to look for "something else" to make them stand out. Homeschooling gives you plenty of opportunities.

 

This is what scares me the most! I like what I've read so far in How to be a Highschool Superstar. It really fits my vision of what homeschooling could be.

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Honestly, I'm hoping that we don't accelerate. I'm remembering my senior year of public high school which was a complete waste of time. Since we are homeschooling, we have many great options for that last year.

 

 

 

I graduated a semester early just because I hated school. I am excited for some of the options ds will have for his schooling.

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I will have a ninth grader next year too. My fear is that by choosing NOT to go the AP route I will destroy her chance to get into a decent college. She will be doing several SAT II tests but not APs.

 

I guess another fear is that there are ONLY 4 YEARS LEFT! How can we cover all the stuff we want/need in just 4 years?

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I will have a ninth grader next year too. My fear is that by choosing NOT to go the AP route I will destroy her chance to get into a decent college. She will be doing several SAT II tests but not APs.

 

 

Remember that you don't have to have an AP course to take an AP test. Many homeschoolers and some public schooled students self-study and just take the tests.

 

Middle son did this with AP Stats. I chose to use a book recommended on here by those who had been successful and bought him the Teacher's Edition so he would have all the little notes and answers, etc. We also bought a recommended study guide. He got a 5.

 

This year we're doing similarly with AP Psych and AP Calc, but since he's a senior, I'm not sure if he's going to take the tests or not. It might depend upon which college he's going to.

 

In hindsight, I'd have had him do a couple more junior year (possibly sophomore year). When competing with others out there for top colleges, I (personally) wouldn't want none. Some top college adcoms told me they have an academic "bar" they want to see - then they look at all the individuals who meet it. It would sure help to have one or two 5s on AP to substantiate a homeschooler's academics. My guy also has community college As, but those, while useful for letters of recommendation, aren't seen as rigorous as AP.

 

For less than top colleges, I'm pretty certain it's ok to have none, but one or two still doesn't hurt - especially if one is competing for merit aid.

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...My guy also has community college As, but those, while useful for letters of recommendation, aren't seen as rigorous as AP.

 

For less than top colleges, I'm pretty certain it's ok to have none, but one or two still doesn't hurt - especially if one is competing for merit aid.

 

The director of admissions at our local community college stated at an information session that if a student is planning on applying to highly selective schools, she recommends that the student take an AP class rather than a class at our local community college. I don't know if this is a true statement across the board or only applies to our local community college.

 

I have read that the rigor of community college courses varies depending on the region, but I am not sure how one goes about determining the rigor of the local community college.:confused: I do know that the Organic Chemistry class offered at our local community college would not be accepted by our local private university. Maybe that fact speaks to the level of rigor at our local community college.

 

Also, before you enroll your younger high school student in a class at the community college, make sure you investigate how many years he would be eligible to take classes at the cc and still be considered a high school student. I had a friend run into trouble with this issue:

 

I had a friend who wanted her son to begin taking his math classes at our local cc when he was a high school freshman. The director of admissions at the cc told my friend that her son could enroll, but she would have to declare him a junior. My friend declared him a junior to satisfy the cc requirement, but was still considering him a freshman on his high school transcript. When my friend went to enroll her son in classes when her son was technically a high school sophomore, she was told that he would not be able to take any classes after the sophomore year because the cc considered him a high school senior. In order to continue his studies at the cc, she would have had to have graduated him from high school - something she did not want to do.

 

I have read of students taking cc classes throughout all four years of high school with no problem. However, at our local community college, that is not an option.

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Can I join late?

 

I wasn't on the boards much over the holidays, so I only just saw this now. I am definitely freaking out about starting high school next year with my 13yo.

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Can I join late?

I wasn't on the boards much over the holidays, so I only just saw this now. I am definitely freaking out about starting high school next year with my 13yo.

 

Megan, your tardiness has been duly noted, but an exception has been made provided this isn't a recurring problem.

 

 

:D

 

Welcome!!! :)

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Megan' date=' your tardiness has been duly noted, but an exception has been made provided this isn't a recurring problem.

 

 

:D

 

Welcome!!! :)[/quote']

 

I'll be good, I promise.

 

:001_smile:

 

So, I suppose I should introduce myself and my student. I've been home educating for over 10 years, but this is my first time around with high school because my oldest went into state school when he was in year 9 (American 8th grade).

 

My 13yo is bright but extremely unmotivated. He does what I tell him to without much complaint, but only does the bare minimum and never pushes himself. Right now he says that he wants to be a police detective, so he's willing to go to college, but isn't super excited about it. He doesn't really have a passion for anything. I'm hoping that will come soon.

 

I've been reading Beyond the Ivy League by Loren Pope and am really excited by what he says about how many of the smaller, less competitive colleges actually offer a better education than the larger research universities. I spent my freshman year at a small liberal arts college and then transferred to a highly competitive, but not ivy league, university and what he is saying really resonates with me. I didn't go to a big research university, like he's describing, but I can see that at a smaller college the professors get more involved with their students and there is more of a mentorship than at the larger universities. So this book is really giving me a lot to think about as I try to figure out what direction we need to go with high school work.

 

I've only gotten through about half of the posts in this thread so far, but I'm really looking forward to learning from everyone here.

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Megan' date=' your tardiness has been duly noted, but an exception has been made provided this isn't a recurring problem.

[/quote']

 

I don't feel tardy!

(uh oh, I think I just outed myself as coming of age in the 80's :D)

 

I am here too! Aspie ds prefers to simply jump through the hoops necessary to get to his real-life goal of artistic woodworking. I am figuring out how to sneak in more academics so that he has opportunities should his interest change.

 

DD wants to do all studies necessary to attend a top-notch school and become a research scientist-archaeologist-detective-portrait artist-top chef-vet with fluency in multiple languages modern and classical.

 

No problems here! :willy_nilly:

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The director of admissions at our local community college stated at an information session that if a student is planning on applying to highly selective schools, she recommends that the student take an AP class rather than a class at our local community college. I don't know if this is a true statement across the board or only applies to our local community college.

 

I have read that the rigor of community college courses varies depending on the region, but I am not sure how one goes about determining the rigor of the local community college.:confused: I do know that the Organic Chemistry class offered at our local community college would not be accepted by our local private university. Maybe that fact speaks to the level of rigor at our local community college.

 

Also, before you enroll your younger high school student in a class at the community college, make sure you investigate how many years he would be eligible to take classes at the cc and still be considered a high school student. I had a friend run into trouble with this issue:

 

I had a friend who wanted her son to begin taking his math classes at our local cc when he was a high school freshman. The director of admissions at the cc told my friend that her son could enroll, but she would have to declare him a junior. My friend declared him a junior to satisfy the cc requirement, but was still considering him a freshman on his high school transcript. When my friend went to enroll her son in classes when her son was technically a high school sophomore, she was told that he would not be able to take any classes after the sophomore year because the cc considered him a high school senior. In order to continue his studies at the cc, she would have had to have graduated him from high school - something she did not want to do.

 

I have read of students taking cc classes throughout all four years of high school with no problem. However, at our local community college, that is not an option.

 

This matches what I've heard. And at our cc one must be at least 16 to take classes and have tested into college level classes (no remedial classes at all). Different states and probably even different ccs have different rules.

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We have been jumping around a bit, but I always seem to come back to this site and TWTM style of schooling. No matter how much I try to tell myself that workbooks are easier, I HATE them and my kids aren't thrilled with them either.

 

So, my oldest son is in 8th grade this year and I am SO nervous about starting high school next year. Lately, the reality of it has begun to sink in as we have been talking more about it.

 

I am not sure how to give grades using this type of schooling. I know math, science, and grammar will be tolerable, but what about everything else?

 

I had begun switching many of the subjects to workbook style because I was so scared that he was not "getting" stuff or that it wasn't sticking. I don't think the workbook style is helping with any of that and makes the subjects drier than they should be which causes less interest and less sticking!

 

So, now I am getting back into the WTM style, but right in time for hs. Any suggestions on how to do this after having been away from it for a while?

 

Thank you for any suggestions!

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I'm the mother of an 8th grade ds. We started homeschooling in 4th grade after he was miserable from the homework load at his parochial school. I didn't think we'd last 6 weeks, yet here we are 5 years later. My plan was to send him to a rigorous, Catholic, all boys-college prep high school. Now that we're here, I'm not sure I want to send him--especially b/c they warn the students that the workload will involve 2-3 hours of homework a night--this for my homework phobic son.

 

But, he says he wants to go. Dh is afraid he doesn't have the work ethic and will get less than stellar grades. I'm afraid I'll have a miserable teen on my hands who has no time for anything but school and his one sport.

 

Our local high school has partial enrollment (2 classes) so we're looking at that.

 

At this point I want to keep him home until he's a junior and then have him take 2 classes at either the hs or cc.

 

Now that high school is on the immediate horizon, I'm eager to dig in--except for the math and science part.

 

It's been great 'meeting' everyone.

 

Laura

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Sign me up!

 

My youngest son will be an 8th grader in the fall.

 

I have already graduated one, and have another one who graduates in May, so this will be our 3rd round of homeschooling high school!

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I wasn't sure if I could join this thread, since my dd is 9th grade...but really she is still only half way finished with 8th grade because of our moves. We have moved twice in a year and a few months. We really underestimated how long it would take to settle into our new home (Okinawa, Japan). We lived in a hotel for 22 days (this was after staying with family in the states for over 3 weeks before we flew over and were without a home). We then lived without our main furniture and stuff for more weeks. We've been unsettled since the third week of October and are just now starting to settle. I'm still waiting for more bookcases to put away the rest of our books...so no time for planning still. We've done some school work in spurts over this time period, but not enough. I hope to start next Monday. This is why dd is only half way finished with 8th grade. The plan is to finish and move right into our 9th grade work. We'll school year round and try to catch up. I'm so stressed!!:lol:

Sorry, I didn't mean to sound so whiney!!:001_smile:

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I wasn't sure if I could join this thread, since my dd is 9th grade...but really she is still only half way finished with 8th grade because of our moves. We have moved twice in a year and a few months. We really underestimated how long it would take to settle into our new home (Okinawa, Japan). We lived in a hotel for 22 days (this was after staying with family in the states for over 3 weeks before we flew over and were without a home). We then lived without our main furniture and stuff for more weeks. We've been unsettled since the third week of October and are just now starting to settle. I'm still waiting for more bookcases to put away the rest of our books...so no time for planning still. We've done some school work in spurts over this time period, but not enough. I hope to start next Monday. This is why dd is only half way finished with 8th grade. The plan is to finish and move right into our 9th grade work. We'll school year round and try to catch up. I'm so stressed!!:lol:

Sorry, I didn't mean to sound so whiney!!:001_smile:

 

Rest assured that the moving process and the different culture is an education in itself - plus - 8th grade isn't all that important as far as colleges are concerned. You'll (both) be fine even if you opt to skip some parts (which I might choose to do, pending how important I thought those parts were). ;)

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I don't feel tardy!

(uh oh, I think I just outed myself as coming of age in the 80's :D)

 

 

 

:lol:

 

I brought my pencil! Give me something to write on, man.

 

Class of 88. :D

 

I can smell the hair spray now. :lol: (class of 85)

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I fear that I have already irreparably harmed ds when we skipped first grade. He'll turn 14 at the end of August, and throughout his high school and college career, he'll be grouped with students who may be more than a year older than he.

 

For what it's worth, my daughter was grade skipped in kindergarten, and has a late summer birthday. She turned 15 in July, and is a high school junior this year.

 

Being a year younger (or more!) has never been an issue. She just finished her first semester as a full-time dual enrolled college student with a 4.0 GPA, and has an awesome group of friends. The college professors are not told which students are dual-enrolled high schoolers, so I'm not even sure if they can tell. She's an assistant catechist in our church's religious education program, teaching the 9th grade class. Most of the kids in there are the same age as her, but they have no idea.

 

So don't stress the age thing, really. It worried me a lot when we first started, but it's actually been way less of an issue than I anticipated it would be. People just assume she's older, and don't know unless she's tells them.

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For what it's worth, my daughter was grade skipped in kindergarten, and has a late summer birthday. She turned 15 in July, and is a high school junior this year.

 

Being a year younger (or more!) has never been an issue. She just finished her first semester as a full-time dual enrolled college student with a 4.0 GPA, and has an awesome group of friends. The college professors are not told which students are dual-enrolled high schoolers, so I'm not even sure if they can tell. She's an assistant catechist in our church's religious education program, teaching the 9th grade class. Most of the kids in there are the same age as her, but they have no idea.

 

So don't stress the age thing, really. It worried me a lot when we first started, but it's actually been way less of an issue than I anticipated it would be. People just assume she's older, and don't know unless she's tells them.

 

:iagree:

My DD has skipped a grade and is doing highly accelerated work. She started taking college classes at age 13 and sings in the university choir; the other students are usually very surprised when they find out her age, everybody assumes she is older.

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:iagree:

My DD has skipped a grade and is doing highly accelerated work. She started taking college classes at age 13 and sings in the university choir; the other students are usually very surprised when they find out her age, everybody assumes she is older.

 

 

I have to admit that I'm a tad bit worried about ds being younger than most--his b/d is the end of May and one of his good friends who is in same grade is more than a whole year older. It doesn't help that he is immature. DD12 became a 'teenager' before ds--we're still waiting. I do think it's more likely for many girls to mature faster than boys, but even among his peers, ds just seems young. I keep reading about a turn for boys around 16 on this board and this gives me hope.

 

Laura

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My oldest will start high school next year. I am not in panic mode because I am sure that I am still in denial that he will be a hs freshmen next year! He wants to homeschool until graduation. We are in TX so I have downloaded the requirements for all the different diplomas and will try and use that as a guideline. More than likely he will attend the university here in town because of costs. They are homeschool friendly but I need to check their requirements for admission as well.

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I have to admit that I'm a tad bit worried about ds being younger than most--his b/d is the end of May and one of his good friends who is in same grade is more than a whole year older. It doesn't help that he is immature. DD12 became a 'teenager' before ds--we're still waiting. I do think it's more likely for many girls to mature faster than boys, but even among his peers, ds just seems young. I keep reading about a turn for boys around 16 on this board and this gives me hope.

 

Laura

 

My worry and stress and hope. Two and a half years seems like a loooong time :glare:.

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