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angelaguptathomas

Is COmmunity College a "safe" environment for 16 year old female?

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I'm still a few years away, but a friend of mine refuses the idea of CC, because of her dd being in classes with "older" men and the possibility of negative influences from an "older crowd." What is the impact of CC environment on a teenage female? Thank you, Angela

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It really depends on the individual college and your student's maturity level. There are many ways to handle things. I've known parents who have walked their students to class and picked them up afterwards. I've known students who have "buddied up" to take their first class together. So there are many ways to approach the situation, but the most important thing is to know your individual campu and your student.

 

Anne

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I'm not sure it's a whole lot different than when our 13 year old daughter was in a high school class with kids who were 18. Lots of kids face that kind of thing. Most of my kids' friends were 16 when they started college...some thrived and some floundered.

I agree with Laurel...daytime classes and making her age known (but not flaunting it because some students might prejudge her) are things to consider.

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I personally find it SAFER in some ways to do when they are a little younger. That way parents are a little more involved, screening things somewhat, there to notice a problem while they are first headed out into a less monitored part of the world. Same with content. I'd rather my daughter be exposed to things under our roof rather than at 19 if she's away from home at that time (not encouraged, btw). I want to be able to reiterate our belief systems, get her thinking what scriptures say, etc proactively as well as when topics come up.

 

Of course, you can get a lot of basic college credits out of the way from home with either distance learning, CLEPing/APing, etc.

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I taught at one and have to say that it is a mixed bag. I have also taught at a University for 6+ years and the youth are so much higher quality. The cc crowd had a lot of issues (probably the same at the U), but the quality of solving the problems were very immature. Your day classes would probably give you a younger crowd- where night time can produce everything and everyone. I think a child needs to probably stay away from study groups and misc. library time if your are worried. Sorry not to be too much help- but this is a concern for me too!

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My daughter took classes at the community college this past year (Fall and Spring Semesters) and she was 16.

 

She had NO problems whatsoever. Most of the students there were between 18 and 21, if she had to guess. Most of what I would call "adult men" (i.e., in their 20s and 30s) are working during the day -- you would find more of those if your student were taking night classes.

 

She had alot of older ladies in her classes -- moms in their 30s and 40s and even older, who were taking classes now that their children had left the proverbial nest.

 

But she complained more about the negative influences of her classmates when she took a class at the local high school in 9th grade! :D

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I've heard a few anecdote, one was about the community college class that had a requirement that the students attend a Mexican bar to "absorb some culture." The homeschooled kid in this case was underage and dropped the class.

 

Another incident I heard about was a 16 year old "stalked" to her car by an older male.

 

Many homeschooolers where we live do attend some community college classes, as a transition step, and some of those classes are even attended online.

 

Another friend believes that the community college experience, especially for certain literature-rich options, is probably going to be more limited than having that class with a crowd of well-prepared freshmen at certain liberal arts colleges--for the group reading this board who are interested in classical education and have prepared their children rigorously--this may be a limitation of community colleges.

 

But, there seems to be a certain need on the part of 16+ students to shake out those wings and test them in flight over gentle waters. . .

 

Don't really know the answers to these questions, either.

 

Pat

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My oldest dd didn't start CC until she had just turned 17yo. If transportation & scheduling hadn't been an issue we would have started her at 16. At first I accompanied her to campus. Toward the end of the semester, I started letting her drive herself. She took one class in the summer to begin. The next semester, in Fall, she took two classes and because there was a group of homeschoolers she knew who also took classes she had a fairly safe social experience.

 

If we had started her at 16, I would have chosen to accompany her to campus for the full first year. I will say that she did study martial arts during high school; while that wouldn't have been a foolproof way of dealing with a physical assault issue, she at least had some skills to cope should something arise & the mental awareness of what was going on around her which helps one to avoid being a target.

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I know a high school science teacher who runs a dual/concurrent enrollment program with our local CC. The idea didn't really take off with the parents of potential students until she set up some procedures to make sure that her high school students were somewhat insulated from the general student body. They are bussed directly to their classrooms which are separate from the regular classrooms. One thing she had to consider was that her program (science/nanotechnology) required her students to be on the main campus which is far different in atmosphere than the other locations.

 

IMO, it might be wise at least in the beginning to accompany her.

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The last 2 years I've taken some day and night general studies classes at the local CC.

 

If I had to sent my 16 yo ds or dd to school it would be to CC.

 

Why? There was far more anarchy in the high school classes. More drugs, sex, and weapons. I've never seen any of these at a CC.

 

The students at the CC are there to learn, not because they are required to be there. The professor can toss misbehaving students from the class in a heartbeat. The students are more emotionally mature.

 

At high school the culture is down right disgusting. And the teachers are powerless. There were far more perverts in high school - they're just younger.

 

The downside to CC? The 16yo needs to be more responsible too. The professors will not babysit them.

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The students at the CC are there to learn, not because they are required to be there.

 

:iagree: Ask me again when Becca is 16, but for the CC I atttended briefly, I was surprised at how many students were actual adults! I'd venture a guess that that was a more mature (studious; disciplined) atmosphere than a 4 year college.

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I personally find it SAFER in some ways to do when they are a little younger. That way parents are a little more involved, screening things somewhat, there to notice a problem while they are first headed out into a less monitored part of the world. Same with content. I'd rather my daughter be exposed to things under our roof rather than at 19 if she's away from home at that time (not encouraged, btw). I want to be able to reiterate our belief systems, get her thinking what scriptures say, etc proactively as well as when topics come up.

 

I'd have to agree with this 100%. And also with what some later posters said about CC being much safer than public h.s. We've done both. Ds went to public hs for 9th grade--it was a complete disaster. By the end of the year he had decided to forgo class attendance in favor of marijuana smoking and did not turn in any of his work. I tried to intervene to force him to attend classes and the teachers actually prevented me from it. So we pulled him out and put him in cc at 15. He has thrived there. We're also doing Sonlight 8 this year in addition to his community college classes and he has just blossomed. The Sonlight material helps counteract any negative philosophies he encounters in his cc classes and he has been very mature about getting his work done. He managed a 3.5 average. Not bad for a 15 year old. He didn't really make any friends at the cc, but that's o.k. He has friends. What he needs is an education.

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The downside to CC? The 16yo needs to be more responsible too. The professors will not babysit them.

 

This would be in the "plus" column for me. :001_smile: High school teachers who babysit their students do them no favors, IMO.

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was at 8am in the morning. The vast majority of his class was adults who had to be there, then went from class to work. By 9:20am, when class let out, he said the regular young adult student were showing up for 9:30 morning classes, and there was a regular group that generally passed around a joint or two. I didn't believe him, so I went "to the library" one morning just at the time his class let out, and sure enough, they were at it. !! I was very surprised, b/c the town police sure were on campus enforcing the 20mph speed limit, but apparently they didn't care about the pot.

 

Aside from the foul language, and the bad CS prof, he has enjoyed his classes at the university this year.

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My then 15 yo twins started this past year. They each took one class per semester. My daughter took both classes online. My son took one online and the other on campus. Both had good experiences.

 

I spoke with the Homeschool counselor ahead of time and asked which teachers like having HS students in their classes and enrolled them in those classes. My son made out. He took one of his classes on campus, it met every Sat, and it was ALL HS students. My son told me that they were motivated students.

 

I had found out previous to him going that the students had to put in an application to attend college classes and had to be approved. So only the top performers could go.

 

This fall I have them enrolled in classes. They will take a History class together, then my son will take a Calculus class by himself. I heard great things about the Calc teacher my son will have so I am ok with this.

 

So I guess what I am saying is....why not start the child while they are still at home but be well informed. I would rather my kids go now when I can help them navigate that stage of their lives.

 

I need to get them going....:auto:

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I don't think there is alot of social interaction during classes. THe interaction comes in hanging around the student center between classes or in thye dorms of a 4 year college/university. In class a 16 year old should be fine, its out of class. I'd worry about mine walking around on campus after an evening course. During the day I would establish boundaries - walk this way to library, can't go through the woods etc or pick her up right after class.

 

PS - you can't go to mexican bar until you're 21 so its out for all typical age CC students.

 

CB

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I had planned on taking a class with my dd when she is about 16 just so we can both get "used" to it! Once she feels comfortable she can go on her own, but only morning/day classes...

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:iagree:

 

I personally find it SAFER in some ways to do when they are a little younger. That way parents are a little more involved, screening things somewhat, there to notice a problem while they are first headed out into a less monitored part of the world. Same with content. I'd rather my daughter be exposed to things under our roof rather than at 19 if she's away from home at that time (not encouraged, btw). I want to be able to reiterate our belief systems, get her thinking what scriptures say, etc proactively as well as when topics come up.

 

Of course, you can get a lot of basic college credits out of the way from home with either distance learning, CLEPing/APing, etc.

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Aside from the foul language, and the bad CS prof,

 

One of the biggest complaints I hear from local dual enrolled students that I talk to is putting up with foul language, especially from the professors. :glare:

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