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Designing a non-traditional math course for a math-loving, structure-hating child


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First, I hope it's okay to post this here on the high school board. I'm looking for ideas to help my math-loving son keep loving math. At the same time, I'm unable to let all structure go because I've found that he thrives best with a daily plan.

This child has completed Algebra I and a few chapters from the AoPS Intro Number Theory and Intro Geometry books. He is however, hitting chapters that are obviously becoming too hard for him to handle on his own. We are at this present time, unable to afford a tutor/ mentor so a lot of the hand-holding comes from me/ Dad but to be honest, I'm no math expert and his Dad travels/ is very busy with work at least 2 out of every 3-4 weeks.

His frustration with the more difficult chapters in the AoPS books is undermining his usual confidence in the subject. He has stopped doing math for fun like he used to...and this worries me.

I have other high school math texts at home but I don't think that's the solution for him atm. We live too far away from math circles and he is not too keen on working on math olympiad style books either. I was wondering if I could come up with a plan that involves working with numbers and patterns at a high challenge level but not as challenging as AoPS for now. For instance, a plan that could combine codes and ciphers, geometrical constructions, reading about math, logic puzzles etc. He has always been fascinated by trig so I'm not sure how to include that without doing geometry first. Perhaps what I'm looking for is a type of math unit study but for a longer period of time and at a high challenge level (about jr high-freshman level)

So here are my questions:

1. I would love ideas for books and resources for the plan described above. We have exhausted most of the living math and code-cipher and constructions-type books at the 4th-8th grade levels. I'd love suggestions for books and websites.

2. He thrives with videos. Has anyone used Khan Academy as their sole math curriculum? I'm thinking of having him do a little Khan daily or every other day to just help keep things fresh in his head while he plays with the non-traditional math resources I'm seeking in question 1.

3. Any suggestions on introducing trig without going through geometry first? I keep telling him we can't do trig without geometry...but I'm not totally convinced about this. I mean, I've had people tell me 8-year-olds can't do algebra I on their own and obviously, it was different for him.

He's still young so perhaps if it's not working, we could always revert back to the traditional sequence later when he is of high school age?

Thanks for listening and reading this far!

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This sounds like my son a few years ago.

 

I'd suggest looking into some of the Key Curriculum Press books, in particular, Crossing the River With Dogs, which is full of sophisticated math problems (the book is used in college courses for non-math majors) but presented in a whimsical way.

 

For videos my son loved "The Joy of Mathematics," a video course through the Teaching Company taught by Arthur Benjamin.

 

And I can't say enough good things about the "Murderous Maths" series by Kjartan Poskitt, which goes through trigonometry. Here is the web site:

 

http://www.murderousmaths.co.uk/

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Some resources that worked well for us - not free but your library may have some of these (and some of the others you can probably get older editions for pretty cheap).

 

Books by Martin Gardner and Ian Stewart.

 

Teaching Company courses. - Joy of Mathematics is good and there are many others.

 

Thinkwell courses with Dr. Burger (he's on some of the TC courses too).

 

This book http://www.amazon.com/Crossing-River-Dogs-Problem-Students/dp/1931914141 Yes, it is supposed to be a college level book but there are problem solving portions that would certainly be appropriate for middle schoolers.

 

Just as an exploratory thing he might want to search for free fractal drawing software online. That can be fun to play with.

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Actually here is a better page to see the Murderous Maths books:

 

http://www.murderousmaths.co.uk/

 

They are published in the UK. I have heard they will come out in the US 'soon' but we were willing to pay the postage and my son still after 3 years enjoys taking them out and re-reading them. They each have a different focus and can be read out of order but there is something to be said for ordering them all and letting your child choose their own path.

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Thank you for your suggestions!

 

He's read all the Murderous Maths books, and he wants more trig now. We have the Crossing the River book, he hasn't taken a look at it for a while so I'll definitely add that in, thanks so much for reminding me! :)

 

We have several Art Benjamin and other Great Courses on math but not Joy of Math so thanks for that idea too! I'll definitely look for fractal software as well.

 

He has been a math addict for some time now so goes through resources very quickly when they appeal to him so I'd love more suggestions if anyone thinks of any.

 

I just spoke to him about putting the AoPS books away for a while and he's excited to try this new approach. We love AoPS but obviously, there's also a limit to what he can take atm.

 

Thanks again for listening to me. I was quite worried earlier today.

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Have you tried the AOPS pre-Algebra book and course? My son took the AOPS Algebra course last year when he was 10 and did all right but kind of hated it. It was his idea to do AOPS pre-Algebra this year and it has been a great thing for him, as the AOPS course even at the pre-algebra level has a lot of actual algebra in it, and it has given him a chance to relax, have fun, and really nail difficult concepts.

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The math mini's on the Mathcounts website are great.

 

Take a look at Alcumus on the Art of Problem Website. It starts easy and works at the levelf of your child. It is addictive and teaches lots, but it is easy to do just a problem or two. Too often we're in the middle of a challenge and want to keep solving more problems.

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Project Mathematics has some good, if old-fashioned, trig videos. They were produced at Caltech by Tom Apostol, one of my math heroes (:001_wub:...author of my favorite theoretical calculus books). Each one has an accompanying workbook available, too.

 

We showed the trig series to our 8 to 10 year old mathies at camp last summer, and they were a hit. The only snag is that they're kind of pricey for home use. But if he's really interested, you might want to check them out.

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Actually here is a better page to see the Murderous Maths books:

 

http://www.murderousmaths.co.uk/

 

They are published in the UK. I have heard they will come out in the US 'soon' but we were willing to pay the postage and my son still after 3 years enjoys taking them out and re-reading them. They each have a different focus and can be read out of order but there is something to be said for ordering them all and letting your child choose their own path.

 

You can order them from bookdepository with free shipping. http://www.bookdepository.com/search?searchTerm=murderous+maths&search=search

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My 9 year old also finished Algebra 1 last year. We tried going into AoPS Counting and Probability but found it too difficult. We decided to go back and do AoPS Prealgebra for a few reasons. First, the material is easier, which allows him/us to get used to AoPS's method of teaching. It also lets us wet our feet with problem solving on easier material. Second, there are plenty of new concepts in their version of prealgebra that we haven't already covered. He's also spending time at Khan Academy and Alcumus.

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I second Martin Gardner too. We like this one:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Colossal-Book-Short-Puzzles-Problems/dp/0393061140/

 

Also, Moscow Puzzles is nice to have.

 

DS learned some Trig from doing Khan problems and watching his videos. I borrowed Lial's Trigonometry from the library when he was really interested in Trig this summer. He didn't read much though(I probably read it more than he did) But if your library has trig textbooks, maybe your son might like to read one of them? A traditional textbook may be a good way to relax and learn?

 

We bought The Cryptoclub when DS was younger, but it may be a little easy for your DS now.

 

Maybe he will like Harold Jacobs' Mathematics--A Human Endeavor too?

 

We also have bunch of old Dell logic puzzle magazines that they sell cheap on their website.

 

Just some ideas. HTH.

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Wow! Great ideas from everyone! In addition, maybe some "off the beaten path" math topics and problem solving in:

 

Calculus for and by Young People (book and a CD with videos)

(explore the author's website)

(see samples)

(purchase)

 

 

TOPS units (I'm guessing a 9yo would enjoy the hands on aspect of these) -- these are rated for grades 6 up through high school

#02 Measuring Length

#03 Graphing

#07 Far Out Math

#08 Probability

#35 Metric Measuring

#36 More Metrics

 

 

Patty Paper Geometry -- rated for grades 6-10, so this might be a great introduction into Geometry for him!

 

 

GENERAL RESOURCES

- Between the Folds -- incredible film on the mathematic, scientific, and artistic uses of origami

- The Phantom Tollbooth (Juster) -- a fun Alice-in-Wonderland-like math world

- Conned Again, Watson! Cautionary Tales of Logic, Math, and Probability (Bruce)

- The Number Devil: A Mathematical Adventure (Enzensberger)

- Math Trek: Adventures in the Math Zone (Peterson)

- Math Trek 2: A Mathematical Space Odyssey (Peterson)

- The Man Who Counted: A Collection of Mathematical Adventures (Tahan)

- The Adventures of Penrose the Mathematical Cat (Pappas)

- Exploring the World of Mathematics (Tiner) -- key math discoveries and puzzles through history, and their connection with science

- Mathematicians Are People, Too: Stories from the Lives of Great Mathematicians (Reimer)

Edited by Lori D.
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You guys are the best! :)

 

I don't mean to be ungrateful but we already have (and DS has read and worked with) so many of the books suggested. He is a math-addict through and through and does math even when I ask him to go play. Using the AoPS books and stumbling and getting upset is the first time that I'm seeing him lose interest and why I was stumped.

 

Martin Gardner books including the Gardner-edited Moscow Puzzles he loves and will repeat-read, so we're still good there. In fact, I think I'll just have him work on these and Crossing the River with Dogs for the next few days and see what happens. (LOL, just suggested this out loud to him while typing the post and he's dancing around the kitchen with joy -- perhaps it's all just a scheduling mistake on my part. I should probably just scrap the rest of the scheduled subjects for a while and let him play more with math).

 

Math Trek, Penrose, The Man Who Counted, every one of those has been read and re-read here. I haven't seen Conned Again Watson though, Lori, so will check that out. Thanks so much!

 

And Project Mathematics sounds great Kathy, thanks so much too!

 

Honoria, we love those geometer pages! I print them out for him to read and play with. It was in one of those pages that he discovered that one of his "pet theories" has already been discovered lol. I will certainly check some of the other links out too.

 

Sorry if I don't thank you all personally. I'm very grateful for all the ideas. I am sure there are some resources I haven't seen yet so I will save this thread and come back whenever I'm stuck.

 

Human Endeavor and Ed Berger for some reason don't excite him. I haven't seen or asked him about the AoPS prealgebra book yet so will do that too.

 

I will copy and paste all the suggestions into another message in this thread so others will be able to have it all in one list.

 

Thanks so much everyone!

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Here are all the non-traditional/ living math resources suggested so far, and hope I'm not missing anything. My thanks again to you all!

Crossing the River With Dogs (Key Press) -- July 2014 update: editions have changed since I last looked. There's an instructor resource and key here, and the edition we briefly used, without a key IIRC, is here.
The Joy of Mathematics by Arthur Benjamin (Teaching Company)
Murderous Maths series by Kjartan Poskitt (cheaper if purchased through Horrible Books or Book Depository, compare prices first!)
Books by Martin Gardner and Ian Stewart
Thinkwell courses
Fractals software/ web applications
The Art of Problem Solving books (not exactly living math but not exactly traditional either) and Alcumus
MathCounts website
Project Mathematics- available here too
Elements of Mathematics snippets
Burger and Starbird's Heart of Mathematics (also, Joy of Thinking Teaching Company course by same professors)
Jacob's Mathematics: A Human Endeavor
Moses Richardson's Fundamentals of Mathematics
MEP-Bletchley Park codes and ciphers free curriculum
Martin Gardner puzzles like this one
The Moscow Puzzles
The CryptoClub (workbook available for free here)
Dell logic puzzles
QED and other books from the Wooden Books series

http://www.ics.uci.e...in/recmath.html
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/math.htm
http://www.geometer.org/mathcircles/
http://mathforum.org....c/sheila1.html
http://opinionator.b....even-strogatz/
http://www.tanyakhov...s/bookrevs.html
http://www.g4g4.com/puzzles1.html
http://users.soe.ucs....education.html
http://www.homeschoo...line/gifted.php
http://www.tarquingroup.com/index.php

Calculus for and by Young People (author's website)

TOPS units:
#02 Measuring Length
#03 Graphing
#07 Far Out Math
#08 Probability
#35 Metric Measuring
#36 More Metrics

Patty Paper Geometry

Between the Folds -- incredible film on the mathematic, scientific, and artistic uses of origami
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJRBiIeFe7Q

N is a Number (Paul Erdos)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iflQseSSfA

The Story of Maths (BBC)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WtAGTFCcbTo

The Phantom Tollbooth (Juster)
Conned Again, Watson! Cautionary Tales of Logic, Math, and Probability (Bruce)
The Number Devil: A Mathematical Adventure (Enzensberger)
Math Trek: Adventures in the Math Zone (Peterson)
Math Trek 2: A Mathematical Space Odyssey (Peterson)
The Man Who Counted: A Collection of Mathematical Adventures (Tahan)
The Adventures of Penrose the Mathematical Cat and other books by Pappas
Exploring the World of Mathematics (Tiner)
Mathematicians Are People, Too: Stories from the Lives of Great Mathematicians Vol 1 (Reimer) and Vol 2

Problem Solving Through Recreational Mathematics by Averbach and Chein

Hard Problems DVD and Hard Problems on YouTube - about the 2006 USA IMO team

The Code Book by Simon Singh
Discrete Math by Arthur Benjamin (Teaching Company)
Book by Brian Bolt
Discovering Trigonometry with Sticks and Shadows (online lessons)
Zome Geometry
eIMACS


I'm also including other materials not mentioned (or I might have missed them if already mentioned) that we've enjoyed or hope to enjoy soon:
The Art and Craft of Problem Solving by Paul Zeitz (Teaching Company)
Books by John Conway (eg. The Book of Numbers)
The Number Freak by Derrick Niederman
The Math Forum problems
Crimes and Math Demeanors
Books by Keith Devlin

Various math opportunities:
from the Stanford site
mathwonk's summer camps post
Philips Exeter Academy free math resources post (thanks to Spy Car/ Bill and Arcadia for some great links)
Arcadia's Math Olympiad links compilation post (awesome Arcadia, thanks so much!)
Ruth's request for graph theory resources (thanks to Ruth for asking, and to all who responded with such fabulous ideas!)
How to become a pure mathematician - lots of links for math up to and beyond calculus (HT to Bostonian)
Math/ Geometry with origami - using origami to enhance math appreciation
Teaching Geometry to a Kinesthetic Learner (August 2013 thread)

ETA: March/April 2013: Updating to add some resources DS is enjoying is his free time and resources I am bookmarking for future use:
Perplexing Puzzles and Tantalizing Teasers by Martin Gardner
Lewis Carroll's Games and Puzzles
The Canterbury Puzzles by Dudenay
Mathematical Amazements and Surprises by Posamentier and Lehmann
Number Theory: A Lively Introduction with Proofs, Applications and Stories by Pommersheim et.al.
The Ambitious Horse: Ancient Chinese Mathematics Problems by Swienciki
Leonardo's Mirror and Other Puzzles by Ivan Moscovich
NRich Maths
Virtual Math Club
BAMO sample problems
MathPath - mathlinks, proof, qualifying test for admission
Wooden Books

ETA: September 2013 - DS is currently studying abstract algebra topics covered in these resources (he is using mentor-created curricula and not these resources specifically, but will refer to them when needed). Linking here for others with kids interested in abstract algebra.
Abstract Algebra: A Study Guide for Beginners
Intro Abstract Algebra
A Gentle Introduction to Abstract Algebra

ETA: March 2014 - Adding elementary and middle school level free pdfs for additional math practice. These are fun and slightly different from standard math curriculum.
MEP curriculum
http://mathlearnnc.s...&pageId=5048438 (scroll down for weekly grade level resources K-2)
http://mathlearnnc.s...&pageId=5051238 (scroll down for weekly grade level resources 3-5)
http://mathlearnnc.s...&pageId=5149151 (scroll down for weekly grade level resources 6-8)
See Arcadia's math workbooks links compilation thread for Math Pizzazz and other resources.

ETA: January 2015 - DS has been using a large number of the resources bookmarked here (since 2007 thereabouts) and is one example of a kid being allowed to play with non-traditional math resources who is doing very well dual enrolled in community college classes. My only regret is that he never has time to pick up Art of Problem Solving books often enough but he has had no trouble whatsoever keeping up with higher expectations in upper high school and intro college level math. Mentioning it here as a chance to encourage those of you contemplating a non-traditional approach to math learning. The key thing for us was to do math in two or three strands...a strand for common math expectations like algebra 1, geometry etc just so we were covering bases, and then, strands for problem solving and fun math alongside.

ETA: April 2015:
These are traditional but high end online courses for math beyond calculus:
Stanford OHSx University-Level Math and Physics (online version and I think it doesn't require Stanford Online High School enrollment)
NETMath (online college mathematics courses from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.)
MIT Primes for research projects

ETA: July 2015:
DS is enjoying Matt Parker's Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension. You might have heard of Matt on Numberphile. Our paperback copy is from The Book Depository (free shipping) because it was cheaper there a few weeks ago vs on Amazon.

ETA: October 2015 - January 2016:
For the first time since we began homeschooling, DS didn't take any formal math classes. Instead, he is unschooling math by creating ideas in his head and working on them whenever the mood strikes him. It's scary but also very fulfilling for me to see that 2 semesters of boring calculus 1 and 2 at the community college did not affect his love of the subject. Currently (early Jan 2016) waiting for news about dual enrolling for math at a major research university! Meanwhile, the AoPS-MIT Primes Crowd Math initiative is keeping him very happy and busy.

ETA: May 2016: Completed a dual enrolled honors math class at said research uni! :) Excited about taking one more in spring 2017.

Fall 2016: applying to colleges and hoping to major in math! This thread was started just after DS turned 9. He has come a long way since then and I am so grateful to you all for your help!

 

Dec 31, 2016: He is 2016's highest (high school level) contributor to the AoPS Crowd Math initiative.

 

Spring 2017: upper division math/ more abstract algebra via honors abstract algebra at the research uni!

 

Feb 2017: Accepted as full time student at said research uni. So happy!

 

Feb 2018: Almost finished with math major requirements and researching Topos Theory with a grad student mentor.

 

Check out The Parallel Project by Simon Singh (cool puzzles).

Edited by quark
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Teaching Company also has a course called Discrete Mathematics. The Code Book is a really good history of cryptography. Oh, and you could try the AoPS online classes (there are some young kids in them). AoPS also has the Intro to Counting and Probability book. Also, the AoPS forums are a great resource.

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Project Mathematics has some good, if old-fashioned, trig videos. They were produced at Caltech by Tom Apostol, one of my math heroes (:001_wub:...author of my favorite theoretical calculus books). Each one has an accompanying workbook available, too.

 

We showed the trig series to our 8 to 10 year old mathies at camp last summer, and they were a hit. The only snag is that they're kind of pricey for home use. But if he's really interested, you might want to check them out.

 

http://math.buffalostate.edu/~giambrtm/MAT501/Projmath/Project_Mathematics%21.html

 

This has videos and pdfs of the chapters.

 

And the same site some bits from "Elements of Mathematics" which my son loves. If you poke around on it there are a few cool things.

 

http://math.buffalostate.edu/~giambrtm/MAT501/Chp1/operations.htm

 

You have a great list so far!

 

I'd add competition math. AMC 8 that type of thing might be fun for him.

 

Zome Geometry

 

and EIMACS logic for mathematics materials

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http://math.buffalostate.edu/~giambrtm/MAT501/Projmath/Project_Mathematics%21.html

 

This has videos and pdfs of the chapters.

 

And the same site some bits from "Elements of Mathematics" which my son loves. If you poke around on it there are a few cool things.

 

http://math.buffalostate.edu/~giambrtm/MAT501/Chp1/operations.htm

 

You have a great list so far!

 

I'd add competition math. AMC 8 that type of thing might be fun for him.

 

Zome Geometry

 

and EIMACS logic for mathematics materials

 

Thanks, onaclairadelaluna! I didn't realize that those films were online anywhere. I knew that the Buffalo State site hosted the CSMP materials, but I had no idea how many other nifty math treasures were hiding out there. :)

 

And I'll second the Zome tool kit.

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  • 1 year later...
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  • 2 weeks later...

I have an advanced 4y old and following a traditional path which is kinda slowing him down. This post opened my eyes to the plethora of possibilities to let him thrive in math without the pressure of workbooks and such (even if it's SM/IP/CWP). Thanks again Quark!

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Fun thread, I'm going to take some notes. 

 

I would definitely work hard to try and bring the joy back, but i would also try and emphasize that it's okay to struggle, and that slowing down and hitting walls is part of the overall learning process. 

 

It can be really hard for some accelerated kids when they first hit work that is truly difficult for them, particularly in a beloved subject. There's nothing wrong with moving backwards or sideways when you are ahead, but I try to make sure my kids know that eventually they are going to get past the point where native intellect and 'fun' amounts of work are enough.  

 

You've probably said all of that at least once, of course, but some kids need to hear it early and often. My dd went through some grim periods in math, lol, but is now excited about senior math and actually considering a math major (and she's not advanced at all in the typical math sequence). 

 

Even 'mathy' kids usually hit this awkward point where the work gets hard but doesn't yet have the interesting payoff that much of the earlier math did. It sounds like you're putting together a good plan to work past it (as much as one can). 

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Fun thread, I'm going to take some notes. 

 

I would definitely work hard to try and bring the joy back, but i would also try and emphasize that it's okay to struggle, and that slowing down and hitting walls is part of the overall learning process. 

 

It can be really hard for some accelerated kids when they first hit work that is truly difficult for them, particularly in a beloved subject. There's nothing wrong with moving backwards or sideways when you are ahead, but I try to make sure my kids know that eventually they are going to get past the point where native intellect and 'fun' amounts of work are enough.  

 

You've probably said all of that at least once, of course, but some kids need to hear it early and often. My dd went through some grim periods in math, lol, but is now excited about senior math and actually considering a math major (and she's not advanced at all in the typical math sequence). 

 

Even 'mathy' kids usually hit this awkward point where the work gets hard but doesn't yet have the interesting payoff that much of the earlier math did. It sounds like you're putting together a good plan to work past it (as much as one can). 

 

Thank you katilac. I agree wholeheartedly with the bolded. Just a small heads up that my OP is an older thread. I updated it recently (post 34) to say how glad I am that we took the path less trodden. I am so glad for this thread because the responses really gave me the courage to allow him to keep using a slightly out of the box way to learn math.

 

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Thank you katilac. I agree wholeheartedly with the bolded. Just a small heads up that my OP is an older thread. I updated it recently (post 34) to say how glad I am that we took the path less trodden. I am so glad for this thread because the responses really gave me the courage to allow him to keep using a slightly out of the box way to learn math.

 

 

Wow, a REALLY old thread, lol. 

 

I'm just getting back from vacation. That is my official excuse. 

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I know this post is old. Here are some suggestionsThe Joy of Mathematics: Discovering Mathematics All Around You and
More Joy of Mathematics: Exploring Mathematics All Around You by Theoni Pappas

What Is Mathematics?: An Elementary Approach to Ideas and Methods by Herbert Robbins

Mitsumasa Anno books

Math Games & Activities from Around the World and
More Math Games & Activities from Around the World by Claudia Zaslavsky

Edited by happybeachbum
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The immortal fun math thread!  :hurray:

 

I'd forgotten about this. I have to go back through the resources listed here now that my kid's older and our situation has changed.

 

FYI: The Number Devil is both a book and a CD-Rom game. We got the book from the library last year, but now I'm curious about the game.

 

In another thread I mentioned Lit2Go, and I went looking through it myself to see if there's anything new. They have various old math books, but one, Philosophy and Fun of Algebra, caught my eye. DH and Crazypants have philosophical discussions often, and I know DH feels a bit intimidated by CP's math skills and disconnected from doing it with him, so I thought this might be a fun thing for them to do together. But on the other hand....it is very much a vintage book. Could any of you math-people take a glance at it and weigh in on whether it is worth spending time on?

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SarahW,

 

I have only read the first chapter but it has less philosophy than I was hoping for. I read from this link which has a pdf, audio and a student activity pdf. The student activity for chapter one is only a question.

http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/95/philosophy-and-fun-of-algebra/1639/chapter-1-from-arithmetic-to-algebra/

 

You can also read from here

https://archive.org/stream/philosophyandfun030851mbp#page/n95/mode/thumb

 

ETA:

I'll read the rest of the book later. Got to get my morning coffee and my kids to german class.

Edited by Arcadia
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I did not like AoPs. But I loved Jurgenson's Geometry. Maybe he just needs a change of curriculum?

 

Also..Derek Owen's classes look great.

He used and finished Jurgensen's! Thanks! Update in post 19! :) He has come a long way since this thread started. I loved all the replies!

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SarahW,

 

I have only read the first chapter but it has less philosophy than I was hoping for. I read from this link which has a pdf, audio and a student activity pdf. The student activity for chapter one is only a question.

http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/95/philosophy-and-fun-of-algebra/1639/chapter-1-from-arithmetic-to-algebra/

 

You can also read from here

https://archive.org/stream/philosophyandfun030851mbp#page/n95/mode/thumb

 

ETA:

I'll read the rest of the book later. Got to get my morning coffee and my kids to german class.

 

I think by "philosophy" it means logic, the limits of knowledge, and a discussion of what infinity is. Which sounds fun to me.  :w00t:

 

I was hoping there'd be more questions provided. But since we're now afterschooling, I'm trying to keep pencil work to the absolute minimum here. The one question should be enough for DH to prompt discussion.

 

I'm envisioning this as bedtime math. Not, obviously, a full Algebra course.

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I knpw this post is old. Here are some so.e suggestionsThe Joy of Mathematics: Discovering Mathematics All Around You and

More Joy of Mathematics: Exploring Mathematics All Around You by Theoni Pappas

 

What Is Mathematics?: An Elementary Approach to Ideas and Methods by Herbert Robbins

 

Mitsumasa Anno books

 

Math Games & Activities from Around the World and

More Math Games & Activities from Around the World by Claudia Zaslavsky

 

Wonderful looking resources, thank you! To quickly add, Anno's books are fabulous and there are more Pappas books out there too for math lovers to discover (search Amazon and also look up livingmath.net). And I completely forgot to include Family Math in post #19.

 

The immortal fun math thread!  :hurray:

 

I'd forgotten about this. I have to go back through the resources listed here now that my kid's older and our situation has changed.

 

FYI: The Number Devil is both a book and a CD-Rom game. We got the book from the library last year, but now I'm curious about the game.

 

In another thread I mentioned Lit2Go, and I went looking through it myself to see if there's anything new. They have various old math books, but one, Philosophy and Fun of Algebra, caught my eye. DH and Crazypants have philosophical discussions often, and I know DH feels a bit intimidated by CP's math skills and disconnected from doing it with him, so I thought this might be a fun thing for them to do together. But on the other hand....it is very much a vintage book. Could any of you math-people take a glance at it and weigh in on whether it is worth spending time on?

 

Your cheering smiley made my morning! That looks like a super fun resource actually. I think *I* would have loved it. My DS though not so much. He loves both logic and philosophy but for him this resource would have come across as patronizing or long winded (don't ask me why, his opinions drove me bonkers too). If CP adores going through these pages, please update us!

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I loved the Family Math Books

 

Mystery Math:  A First Course in Algebra by David Adler

 

The I Hate Mathematics Book and Math for Smarty Pants by Marilyn Burnes

 

Apple Fractions and The Hershey's Milk Chocolate Bar Fractions Book  by Jerry Pallota                             

 

Card Games

http://bedtimemath.org/trading-card-games-for-kids-build-math-skills

http://www.crewtonramoneshouseofmath.com/math-with-playing-cards.html

http://www.guided-math.com/p/card-games.html

http://teachingmahollitz.wordpress.com/2011/09/11/math-games-gin-rummy

 

http://engagedfamilygaming.com/board-games/7-board-games-that-teach-math-skills

 

Can't forget Mancala

http://www.teachingace.com/mancala-and-more-math-mania

 

or Dominoes

http://mathwire.com/numbersense/dominoes.html

 

Senet  Though no one really knows or agrees on how the game was played, because there were no existing instructions how the rules of the game unlike the Royal Game of UR or (20 squares) http://www.cs.brandeis.edu/~storer/JimPuzzles/GAMES/Senet/Senet.pdf

 

On another note a great text (though this is the high school board so yes young) is Ray's Primary Arithmetic.  I used it to teach my younger cousins with vase-fillers during the summer.  I had a lot of aha moments.  Because it's oral, using real objects, how it's structured.  The addition lesson alone taught not only addition, but also subtraction and multiplication.  The main reason is teaching someone else helps you to learn concepts or at least a journey to better understanding.

 

Another great textbook is Mathematics:  A Human Endeavor by Harold Jacobs I found this as well.  http://www.mrbenson.org/math-unplugged/

Edited by happybeachbum
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I think by "philosophy" it means logic, the limits of knowledge, and a discussion of what infinity is. Which sounds fun to me. :w00t:

...

I'm envisioning this as bedtime math. Not, obviously, a full Algebra course.

Chapter 6 and 7 makes some references to the Ten Commandments. Chapter 10 makes reference to Israel and Hebrew. As an agnostic who went to a catholic school for preK-6th and watched Jesus of Nazareth, I get the biblical references but as an agnostic. My kids would be wondering about some references though. I haven't read past chapter 10. Edited by Arcadia
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