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And are they struggling, or enjoying?

 

I'll start:

 

16 yos: Hunchback of Notre Dame. He's a strong reader and he likes it, but he's currently hung up on a "twenty page description of Paris."

 

14 yos: Dante's Inferno, the Robert Pinsky translation. He's NOT a strong reader, but he asked to read it because he saw references to it in a computer game. :rolleyes: He's doing pretty well with it in fairly small chunks--about 4 pages per day.

 

 

I, meanwhile, am reading Shopaholic and Baby. :)

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My 17 year old is reading Mark Twain's Humorous Stories and Sketches. I think she has also started reading The Nazi Officer's Wife since I just finished it and I was telling her about it.

 

I think she is enjoying it. She took it off of her school shelf where it was waiting patiently for its turn to show up on an assignment sheet. I guess I won't need to assign it to her. She is really bad about getting into her literature before I assign it. What a bad girl!

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is reading The Inferno, as is my husband. (Ciardi's translation because we own two copies of it!) Additionally, the same son recently ran away with Bryson's latest on Shakespeare from the library bag, which was fine because I am busy with two books: Deep Economy (Bill McKibben) and The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon, a truly interesting fantasy/mystery.

 

Oh, I do like the ability to easily underline and use italics--nice feature of the new board!

 

Jane

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I'm embarrassed to say that I'm yammering on my 9th grader to read The Diary of Anne Frank. She hasn't yet because she doesn't like "stories that end badly". She's about to start The Iliad, as soon as it comes from the library. She is reading The Well-Educated Mind again. No brown-nosing, Susan, it totally bewilders me because she's already read it once this school year.

 

Having already read Shopaholic and Baby (very cute) I am reading Straight Man by Richard Russo and Key Lime Pie Murder (Joanne Fluke).

 

Lori

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My ds14 is also reading Dante's Inferno, he's doing O.K. with the reading, but he has to analyze it with TOG using a book by Leland Ryken called "Words of Delight." That bit of it is making him a little loopy.

 

For fun he is reading "I Am America (And So Can You!)" It's not entirely appropriate, but it's so funny. I love Colbert's idea of building a big front porch along our borders and manning it with cranky old men who like to yell, "Get off my lawn!", but in this case they would say, "Get off my country!" I guess I'm easily amused. :o

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It has been extraordinarily beneficial to listen to The Teaching Company's lectures on Dante. This is what has kept us company on the way to and from hockey games during the last few weeks. (Trust me, the dear lad's reading assignments are, um, unique! But from what he tells me, the locker room represents some circle of Hell, based on smell alone!)

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Oh, that book is funny. We skipped over some of the chapters. That man really cracks me up. You should hear my dad fussing about him. My son and I have tried to explain that it's all an act, but he just doesn't get it. It's really hilarious to hear him tell me how shocked he is that I think Colbert's funny!

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My 17yo is reading The Great Gatsby. He'd like to know if there is any explanation for why the author (or anyone else) would write (or read) such a book...

 

My 14yo is reading Orestia. He loves to read--but thinks this lacks, um, momentum?

 

I'm not batting a thousand here.

 

I'm still enjoying the depths of Simple Stargazing and The Travels of Marco Polo. Now if we could only have a few nights without clouds...

 

Jean

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I am busy with two books: Deep Economy (Bill McKibben) and The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon, a truly interesting fantasy/mystery.

 

Um, the above is supposed to be in quotations as I was quoting Jane. Obviously I need some practice with the new forum.

Jane,

I am reading The Yiddish Policeman's Union as well! I picked it up on a whim at the library. I am not very deep into it yet, though.

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My teen is reading Dracula and Nathaniel Philbrick's Mayflower. He is enjoying the former, not so much the latter.

 

I am working on two books at the moment. Age of Innocence and What is the What.

Post-football season is the time of year when I can read more than usual and I am enjoying every minute of it.

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For a writing class at the community college:

 

finishing up The Souvenir by Steinman (a memoir written by a woman who finds a Japanese flag among her WWII veteran father's possessions after his death)

 

soon to begin The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien (linked short stories regarding the Vietnam War era)

 

and for pleasure, as many manga and fantasy books as she can squeeze in with other obligations.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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My dd17 is reading through Jane Austen's novels this year. I think she's currently on Mansfield Park.

For fun she just finished Cold Comfort Farm.

My ds15 (not homeschooled) is just starting Robinson Crusoe if I don't steal it from him. Neither of us have ever read it.

I'm reading The Confederacy of Dunces, selection of short mystery stories called Murder Most British, and reading along with The Fellowship of the Ring audio along with Dh.

 

This is my first post here so... here goes nothin'!

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!6yr ds : Just beginning Sir Gawain translated by Tolkein (school reading)

The Treasure of Isengard also by Tolkein (his pleasure reading, I think this is his third time he has read it-he is a total Tolkein fan)

 

myself: Sir Gawain

The Kite Runner

The Bondage of The Will by Martin Luther

 

 

I am computer illiterate however, so hopefully I did this post correctly.

 

Cedarmom

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My ds, 15, started the Pinsky translation, and didn't like it- stating it was too modern, and not "flowy" enough for his liking. He just finished the Longellow translation and loved it. Is that weird or what?!

 

He is now reading Coghill's translation of Chaucer's Cantebury Tales. Next in line are several Shakespeare plays.

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My 17yo is reading Hamlet and Shakespeare and Co. for me. He is reading The Naked Roommate and 107 Other Issues You Might Run Into in College for himself. We are going to start Paradise Lost in two weeks. He is a very strong reader and isn't struggling with these. He struggled with Sir Gawain and the Green Knight - the Tolkien translation, but once we moved up to Shakespeare it has been easier for him. He never thought of Shakespearean English as easy until he started reading Old and Middle English.

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My 18 year old is reading Liberation in the Palm of Your Hand (his current passion is Tibetan Buddhism) and my 14 year old is reading Huckleberry Finn (and enjoying it).

 

I am am reading Your Inner Economist (for my college class) and Shadow Music (I admit -- I love good romance novels!).

 

It will be interesting to see how this post turns out -- I love the new format!

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Ninth grade ds is laboring through the Old Testament and Herodotus, and reading The Times That Try Men's Souls (historical fiction series covering the Revolutionary War period) for fun.

 

I'm also working on the OT and Herodotus, as well as SWB's History of the Ancient World and The Forgotten Man.

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DD-17 (avid reader) used a PaperBackBookSwap credit to get a reading copy of CS Lewis' Till We have Faces

 

DS-14 (prefers video games) used his Christmas Barnes & Noble card to get MYTHOLOGY - The Illustrated Anthology of World Myths and Storytelling which he is reading like a pleasure book (go figure but I'm thinking there must be a WoW angle in there somewhere) and The Daring Book for Boys which I incorrectly thought might be too young for him.

 

I'm only mildly ashamed to admit that I'm currently reading Ann Coulter's latest. (Not putting the actual title here due to respect for the board rules LOL).:p

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I have to admit that I'm a bit intimidated by everything your teens are reading! Because I'm simply thrilled that my 16yo ds, who seems allergic literature, is reading, and thoroughly enjoying, a graphic novel, Maus: A Survivor's Tale. It won the 1992 Pulitzer Prize, so it isn't fluff, but it is a graphic novel. It is the autobiographical story about the author, his father's experience in Auschwitz, and how it shaped their lives together. The Jews are mice, the Germans are cats, and the drawings provide a bit of a buffer from the horrors, though it is a brutally honest story.

 

My ds is discussing it, analyzing it --- he is totally engaged. And I'm thrilled!

 

I'm looking forward to enjoying more of the classics with my younger son, who loves literature. He is a huge fan of mythology and fantasy, though he also loves Sherlock Holmes and James Herriot!

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My 6 yr old dd is reading Herriott's Treasury for children (?), a collection of his short stories, and one of the Betsy Tacy books. I'm working on several books: Pride and Prejudice, Possessing Genius, The Journey of Einstein's Brain, Fox's Book of Martyrs and a frivolous Mrs. Polifax mystery. It all depends on When & Where :D

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Ds18 (junior this year, CC next year, hopefully) is going thru Sonlight's 300 curriculum for history, but we aren't sticking to it too closely.

He just finished The Hiding Place, and is now watching several movies about the Holocaust (just finished Schindler's List and Life is Beautiful--up next is Night and Fog). I'm debating what to assign next--probably just Old Man and the Sea for a quickie.

See my new thread to leave me some ideas for 1950's related fiction!

Thanks

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The newly non-homeschooled 15 y/o is reading Julius Ceasar. She's starting a new four-year history rotation, which is very cool to have had with mom and now to have with enthusiastic history teachers and mostly interested peers.

 

Here's her teacher's history music website: http://www.atlasfret.com/

 

That is, if the link posts.

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just finished Amazing Grace: The Life of William Wilberforce. Before that she read Cry the Beloved Country. She read them easily but didn't really enjoy them that much. She is reading the Hobbit for enjoyment now and is beginning either I Kissed Dating Good-Bye or When God Writes Your Love Story for Health class.

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My oldest dd is taking College Composition II at the local community college this semester and John Steinbeck is the primary literary focus -- so she's reading "Of Mice and Men" (which she read several years ago when she was homeschooling full-time) and "Cannery Row".

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Both my 15-year-old and my 13-year-old are reading Song of Roland. (Omnibus II) They are not enjoying it! We start Winning His Spurs on Tuesday.

 

My 15yo DS just finished reading this and really enjoyed it. I'm about 70 pgs into it also and enjoying it, and finding it an easy read. Most books are difficult for me to read.

 

(used to be Carole in DE)

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My 16 yo ds is reading "Left to Tell: Discovering God Amidst the Rwandan Holocaust" by Immaculee Ilibagiza. This title, along with Kite Runner, which he just finished, are part of his history/lit school reading for the 20th Century period.

 

I just finished a titled called "Boys Adrift" by Leonard Sax which is about the growing epidemic of unmovitated boys. I think someone at the WTM forum recommended this title, and I found it eye opening. If you have boys, you owe it to yourself to read this book.

 

Brenda

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