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News Article, Student given Student ID's based on scores..


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wow...

 

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/students-320444-school-cards.html

 

Intro to article:

 

LA PALMA – State education officials say an Orange County high school that issued color-coded identification cards to students this year based on their standardized test scores is violating the students' privacy and the unlawful practice should be curtailed.

 

Kennedy High School in La Palma is requiring students to carry school ID cards in one of three colors based on their performance on the California Standards Tests – black, gold or white – plus a spiral-bound homework planner with a cover of a matching color. The black card, which is the highest level, and the gold card give students a range of special campus privileges and discounts, while the white card gives students no privileges and forces them to stand in a separate cafeteria lunch line.

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"We have seen tremendous results, and the kids love it," said Ben Carpenter, principal at Cypress High School, which rolled out its program last year in parallel with Kennedy's. "It's the least discriminatory thing we do; anyone is eligible to get a gold card. It's not based on race, GPA, whether the student is an English learner. It's not based on anything other than how hard you work to learn the material in the classroom and how well you've performed in this classroom."

 

Wow. While an individual kid should see better results if he works harder, you simply can't use test scores to determine who is working harder. Some have higher hurdles to cross. A 50th percentile for some kids can mean they've really worked hard, wheras a 50th percentile for others can indicate extreme slacking off. If a professional educator doesn't get that.... There are no words.

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I do think that the separate cafeteria line is taking it a bit far, but "meh" on the rest. I would want my daughter to date a black card holder. I'd expect her to have a black card herself or at least a gold card if she had a bad day. The standard for a gold card is impossibly easy. Proficient in two subjects or improvement in two subjects. The CST isn't normed so theoretically everyone could get a "proficient" score.

 

Maybe its my background as a teacher, but its about time that kids had some stake in how they do on state tests. If you're going to enforce high stakes testing on schools and teachers, then all parties have to have some motivation to do well.

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And how is this different than having a "jock line", as my high school did, where varsity athletes got special treatment? I do think that some of the behaviors described cross the line to bullying-but again, they somehow seem to past muster when it's varsity football players dating cheerleaders.

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Is it also wrong for honor students to have gold tassels at graduation?

 

I think being able to show off your achievement should be fine, but it should be voluntary. I also think some of the stuff sounds punitive rather than motivational - though it's hard to say without being there. I think making a kid carry an "I'm a poor student" card is like the dunce cap. But allowing them to try for an honor pin or forego it is not punitive. It would make more sense for everyone to start out with a white ID card and be allowed to optionally add colors if they excel.

 

If "improvement" or "proficiency" is enough to get the honor, then I don't see a problem. Everyone has the ability to improve. And if there is someone with so many learning problems that he literally cannot improve, then this is no secret to anyone he encounters at school, regardless of how hard the school tries to hide it.

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"We have seen tremendous results, and the kids love it," said Ben Carpenter, principal at Cypress High School, which rolled out its program last year in parallel with Kennedy's. "It's the least discriminatory thing we do; anyone is eligible to get a gold card. It's not based on race, GPA, whether the student is an English learner. It's not based on anything other than how hard you work to learn the material in the classroom and how well you've performed in this classroom."

 

OMG. The least discriminatory ? They shouldn't be doing anything discriminatory, based on any of that other stuff !! I really hope he misspoke there.

 

Color coding their mandatory notebook covers by their performance category is horrible. It is like he is setting up a caste system. Why not just issue performance category color coded T-shirts as school uniforms as well ?

 

Their test scores and what range they fall in should be private. Not on display for the whole school.

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all parties have to have some motivation to do well.

 

Well, except that not all parties have the capability to do well. And where poor teachers SHOULD be outted, I disagree that poor students should be.

 

I would be fine with X% of kids getting a reward for doing well as well as privileges for that. That would be more similar to the tassles. What they have now is more like having people who are not graduating walk across the stage with recognition that they failed. And it suggests they failed because they didn't work hard enough.

 

Also, I believe people do well when they can. Now, why they may not be able to at any given point may not be directly related. So while some may expect a less capable student would struggle, it is also true that a student could have an average IQ but a trauma background so not perform as an average student. So a kid can't perform at a high enough level, a kid who is being mistreated at home or a kid dealing with his mom's dying of cancer gets to get a white card and to relegated to the dunce line? That just isn't appropriate.

 

And lest we forget, we are afterschoolers (and homeschoolers). We are very involved parents who will search out options, afterschool programs, curricula, etc as well as will advocate for our kids at the school. I would guess most parents aren't nearly as involved as we are. Many aren't even to a minimal amount. I am still, for example, getting emails telling me to look at my child's folder every day. Think I'm NOT doing that? Supposedly I also need to be told my child needs to be read to at least 45 minutes per week (and documented). Seriously? I have seven kids, a few of them special needs, and have to document our lives to the extreme for the state, but we read at least that much DAILY.

 

But even with all this, my little girl is doing well because she has a good situation in which to learn now and because she is capable as well as motivated to learn. I have a little boy who is very unlikely to be in the same place two years from now (however, stranger things have happened. Honestly, the little girl looked worse off at the same age).

Edited by 2J5M9K
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Well, except that not all parties have the capability to do well. And where poor teachers SHOULD be outted, I disagree that poor students should be.

 

I would be fine with X% of kids getting a reward for doing well as well as privileges for that. That would be more similar to the tassles. What they have now is more like having people who are not graduating walk across the stage with recognition that they failed. And it suggests they failed because they didn't work hard enough.

 

Also, I believe people do well when they can. Now, why they may not be able to at any given point may not be directly related. So while some may expect a less capable student would struggle, it is also true that a student could have an average IQ but a trauma background so not perform as an average student. So a kid can't perform at a high enough level, a kid who is being mistreated at home or a kid dealing with his mom's dying of cancer gets to get a white card and to relegated to the dunce line? That just isn't appropriate.

 

And lest we forget, we are afterschoolers (and homeschoolers). We are very involved parents who will search out options, afterschool programs, curricula, etc as well as will advocate for our kids at the school. I would guess most parents aren't nearly as involved as we are. Many aren't even to a minimal amount. I am still, for example, getting emails telling me to look at my child's folder every day. Think I'm NOT doing that? Supposedly I also need to be told my child needs to be read to at least 45 minutes per week (and documented). Seriously? I have seven kids, a few of them special needs, and have to document our lives to the extreme for the state, but we read at least that much DAILY.

 

But even with all this, my little girl is doing well because she has a good situation in which to learn now and because she is capable as well as motivated to learn. I have a little boy who is very unlikely to be in the same place two years from now (however, stranger things have happened. Honestly, the little girl looked worse off at the same age).

 

:iagree:

 

My mother died of cancer when I was 16. She was ill for a time prior to that also. As you can imagine, my performance in high school was dismal. If I was forced to carry a card that basically said how stupid I was, I would have dropped out completely. As it was, I barely graduated and that was due to a very involved guidance counselor. I certainly had no one at home who cared about my education.

 

There are many, many reasons why students don't perform well in school. It is way more complicated than just trying hard. I knew kids that were physically abused, had alcoholic parents, had parents in jail, etc. How does a kid perform well on a standardized test when their home lives are out of control?

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Two things.

 

I get that good performance should have a reward but the reward should have a meaningful connection to the performance. Giving kids improved social standing (and that's what this is doing) based on standardized tests results just doesn't seem to be reasonable to me. If you have to do rewards connect it directly to the accomplishment somehow. Save social rewards for kids doing something positive for the social atmosphere of the school.

 

These are standardized tests. These are tests that may determine rewards for the school and state but not give a valuable measure of a kids day-to-day performance and commitment to learning. There may generally be a correlation, yes, but what the kids a REALLY being rewarded for is putting in a good showing for their school and state. That's a team accomplishment but only some individuals are being rewarded.

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"We have seen tremendous results, and the kids love it," said Ben Carpenter, principal at Cypress High School, which rolled out its program last year in parallel with Kennedy's. "It's the least discriminatory thing we do; anyone is eligible to get a gold card. It's not based on race, GPA, whether the student is an English learner. It's not based on anything other than how hard you work to learn the material in the classroom and how well you've performed in this classroom."

 

Wow. While an individual kid should see better results if he works harder, you simply can't use test scores to determine who is working harder. Some have higher hurdles to cross. A 50th percentile for some kids can mean they've really worked hard, wheras a 50th percentile for others can indicate extreme slacking off. If a professional educator doesn't get that.... There are no words.

 

:iagree:

 

My 10yo works harder than any kids I know. He has to, because he is a smart kid who has a lot of issues that interfere with his ability to learn. However, he would get the lowest color simply because he isn't up to grade level.

 

I hate this about as much as giving gift cards and other rewards to kids who score the highest on the EOGs.:glare:

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But, again, to play devil's advocate, how is this different from schools recognizing athletes, when athletics is ALSO a combination of inherent gifts and training, often outside of school, and distributed disproportionately and giving them extra honors and rewards? My experience, as a bright kid with physical disabilities, was that I counted for NOTHING in a public high school because I couldn't throw or catch a ball, or turn handsprings in a short skirt. You could place first at the state in an academic contest, and it might, maybe, get announced in the school newspaper on page 8, three weeks later. But the football team got pep rallies, spirit days, special parties, to cut in the lunch line with impunity, to miss Fridays most weeks without having to make up work, and a lot of other privileges.

 

It seems to me that the caste system already exists in schools-and I fail to see why it's OK to make a child feel bad because they're not coordinated, but wrong to make them feel bad because they're not smart. It is FAR easier, especially if you add in IEP modifications and goals, to have a child meet expectations on a fairly easy state test than it is for a given student to make the Varsity football team or cheerleading squad. If you're going to deny benefits for academic success, then at least do it across the board.

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But, again, to play devil's advocate, how is this different from schools recognizing athletes, when athletics is ALSO a combination of inherent gifts and training, often outside of school, and distributed disproportionately and giving them extra honors and rewards? My experience, as a bright kid with physical disabilities, was that I counted for NOTHING in a public high school because I couldn't throw or catch a ball, or turn handsprings in a short skirt. You could place first at the state in an academic contest, and it might, maybe, get announced in the school newspaper on page 8, three weeks later. But the football team got pep rallies, spirit days, special parties, to cut in the lunch line with impunity, to miss Fridays most weeks without having to make up work, and a lot of other privileges.

 

It seems to me that the caste system already exists in schools-and I fail to see why it's OK to make a child feel bad because they're not coordinated, but wrong to make them feel bad because they're not smart. It is FAR easier, especially if you add in IEP modifications and goals, to have a child meet expectations on a fairly easy state test than it is for a given student to make the Varsity football team or cheerleading squad. If you're going to deny benefits for academic success, then at least do it across the board.

 

I believe that hard work should be honored over innate ability every time, whether it is academics or athletics. BOTH are worthy - there are athletes who can shine on the field, but struggle with lower than grade level academics. Some kids are very musically talented and work at that very hard - they should be honored for their hard work (because talent doesn't get you far without practice.)

 

As to the bolded statement - not true. Trust me.

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