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Science with alot of experiments


thowell
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We have finally taken the plunge and dropped the science at out co-op. The girls were hating it. So here is what they want. Something with ALOT of experiments. They would love it if they could mix and blow stuff up! (not that this is going to happen in my home) For the grade somewhere between 3-6. They are very hands on and need more experiments with a smaller amount of text. So please fire away with all you can think of. Thanks!!

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Hmmm...I could tell you what we're doing for science this year and I've started to make plans for next year... Do you have a theme for this year? This year's theme for us is Biology. Next year is Physics.

 

Here's what we're doing this year (we started in May):

 

We're reading thru Apologia's Land Animals and Botany

Flower dissection lab with lab write-up - sketching and labeling anatomy

Owl Pellet dissection lab : http://www.hometrainingtools.com/owl-pellet-dissection-kit/p/PM-OWLKIT/

Cow Eye Dissection lab (this was incredible and impressed the socks off my husband - he actually stayed home from work to see this): http://www.hometrainingtools.com/cow-eye-dissection-kit/p/DE-KITEYE/

We plan to spend the remainder of the year working thru the Intermediate Dissection Kit: http://www.hometrainingtools.com/dissection-kit-intermediate/p/DE-KITINT/ - it includes a frog, perch, crayfish, grasshopper, earthworm, clam and starfish

 

With each lab, they do a short write-up, draw a diagram and label the anatomy...also, with the cow eye, we watched a professor from a college biology course on Youtube do the dissection and explain the anatomy.

 

I also plan to buy Living World Encyclopedia this winter. Not sure what we're going to do with that yet.

 

 

My plans for next year - we're doing Physics and my son is sooooo excited (he's talking about going into architecture or engineering...).

 

This is still really up-in-the-air and I need to do some more research on this, but we are planning:

 

Usborne Book of Astronomy and Space

we're going to buy a telescope and take it from there ;)

Thames and Kosmos Physics Workshop http://www.hometrainingtools.com/physics-workshop-kit/p/KT-PHYSKIT/

Tekton Plaza Architecture set (or something similar): http://www.amazon.com/Girder-and-Panel-Tekton-Plaza/dp/B000KYZ8G2

we already have Snap Circuits

My son is asking to build a solar car...there are tons of kits out there, but I need to do more research

Also looking into this Astronomy/Space Exploration kit or something similar: http://www.amazon.com/Thames-Kosmos-Astronomy-Space-Exploration/dp/B001ALPJFY/ref=sr_1_1?s=toys-and-games&ie=UTF8&qid=1317837557&sr=1-1

 

Next year is still a work in progress. :)

 

Not sure if any of that helped you, but there are lots of ideas out there!

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I recommend Elemental Science. We did chemistry last year and are doing physics this year. The reading material is very brief and from several different sources. Some of the sources may be too sophisticated for a 3rd grader, but perfect for a 6th grader. Any student from grades 3-6, if they retain most of the material from an ES year, will have an excellent background in the studied subject.

 

After a two-week introduction to the subject, there are options for 2-4 experiments per week. The experiments have (mostly:)) worked and the experiment books (mostly:)) explain the reason for the outcome of the experiment.

 

I have a science-y son and he loves ES. He wanted lots of experiments and ES fills that bill for him. For me, ES gives me a place to implement dictation and narration in a subject he enjoys. Also, my science knowledge is apparently abysmal. I'm learning a lot, too!

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I like the look of ES. I was also just looking at The Elements. As anyone used this? For ES is there a two day schedule for the whole year?

There is a two day schedule and a five day schedule for every week of the year (36 weeks), so you can choose which one to use.

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You never mentioned what kind of science you're looking for. Do you follow TWTM, where one year is physics, one year is biology, etc?

 

Do you want to piece together your own curriculum? Or are you looking for a ready-made one?

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Science Action Labs -- I have the Physical Science: Matter and Motion, and am considering buying more of them.

 

I'm using them for inspiration for a co-op science class I'm teaching for grades 3-5. We're studying Physical Science this year. The class is almost all demonstrations and experiments -- I don't assign homework, although I'm happy to give suggestions for further reading or activities.

 

I also get a lot of ideas from the internet, and various other books. I went through books like The Book of Totally Irresponsible Science and Steve Spangler, wrote down things that looked fun to do and what the heck we were supposed to learn from it, then correlated the list to the order in which I want to teach the concepts. (Steve Spangler's new book just came out -- walking on eggs! gotta try it!)

 

Things we've blown up so far: Mentos in soda (Steve Spangler has info on his website about how to make this into an actual science experiment rather than just a fun thing to do in your backyard), Alka-Seltzer in film canisters (also shot those out of tubes to see how far they'd go -- we varied the amount of water to see which exploded the fastest and which shot the farthest).

 

We've also designed catapults, played WW2 bomber pilot trying to "bomb" targets (when you're running along and drop a tennis ball on a target, when do you need to release it? this correlates to Newton's 1st law -- a body in motion will stay in motion), worked on this Design Squad challenge regarding a zip line (great website for ideas), played with pendulums, practiced whipping table cloths out from under the dishes, and more.

 

I'm trying to work up the nerve to set things on fire. Fire scares me. Also, one of the girls in the class has a fear of balloons, so that's another challenge to work around.

 

So far I've been blogging about this as I go along, but I've been terribly remiss about giving sources of inspiration and further reading.

Edited by GailV
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Wow can we just come take your class. Off to check out your blog and some of the resources you listed.

 

Science Action Labs -- I have the Physical Science: Matter and Motion, and am considering buying more of them.

 

I'm using them for inspiration for a co-op science class I'm teaching for grades 3-5. We're studying Physical Science this year. The class is almost all demonstrations and experiments -- I don't assign homework, although I'm happy to give suggestions for further reading or activities.

 

I also get a lot of ideas from the internet, and various other books. I went through books like The Book of Totally Irresponsible Science and Steve Spangler, wrote down things that looked fun to do and what the heck we were supposed to learn from it, then correlated the list to the order in which I want to teach the concepts. (Steve Spangler's new book just came out -- walking on eggs! gotta try it!)

 

Things we've blown up so far: Mentos in soda (Steve Spangler has info on his website about how to make this into an actual science experiment rather than just a fun thing to do in your backyard), Alka-Seltzer in film canisters (also shot those out of tubes to see how far they'd go -- we varied the amount of water to see which exploded the fastest and which shot the farthest).

 

We've also designed catapults, played WW2 bomber pilot trying to "bomb" targets (when you're running along and drop a tennis ball on a target, when do you need to release it? this correlates to Newton's 1st law -- a body in motion will stay in motion), worked on this Design Squad challenge regarding a zip line (great website for ideas), played with pendulums, practiced whipping table cloths out from under the dishes, and more.

 

I'm trying to work up the nerve to set things on fire. Fire scares me. Also, one of the girls in the class has a fear of balloons, so that's another challenge to work around.

 

So far I've been blogging about this as I go along, but I've been terribly remiss about giving sources of inspiration and further reading.

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  • 3 weeks later...
KONOS :) Seriously, Jessica Hulcy used to be an elementary science teacher.

 

:iagree:

A few weeks back we dissected a cow eye for Konos. It was great. Didn't need a kit though as cow eyes are very simple to dissect. We went to a local slaughter house and they gave us 8 eyes! We all did our own eye and had extra for any istakes. We have also made a crawl through ear. Even my 4 year old enjoys all of this science. Here is a link to the video we made for the eye..you will see my youngest is also very interested.

http://mysblogging.blogspot.com/2011/09/time-to-get-back-into-groove.html

 

Hth,

 

Penny

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