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Korea Kids: Stop Studying So Hard


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http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,2094427-1,00.html

 

This article is kind of crazy. I wanted to share it because I think it shows how difficult it is to form a balanced educational system that actually meets the needs of both children and society.

 

It commented on how Asian schools are trying to become "more American" while American schools are trying to become "more Asian". It really shows that there are no easy answers to the problems in the educational system.

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Interesting article.

 

When dd12 was in K, we were good friends with a family here from Korea - the family had b/g twins in dd12's K class - and the mom and I became friends. I really enjoyed her company -- her dh was a bigwig with World Bank, and she was alone alot of the time so with her two and my three, we became good friends.

 

Her twins attended a full day academic Kindergarten with my dd at a private school. Every evening, a Korean tutor went to their house and they did Kumon 'in Korean' so that the children would retain their ability to speak in Korean when they returned to Korea. They did in fact go back to Korea about two years sooner than they thought they would as her dh was appointed to a very high position in Korea's equivalent of our cabinet in government. She was the mom who introduced me to 'after-schooling' -- which for us was a pre-cursor to homeschooling. She did share with me that one of the biggest concerns of her Korean friends who were here in the US for a period of time was the sorry state of our schools (their words). Many of them paid upwards of 45K a year here in Northern Virginia on private school tuition and tutors to assure themselves that their children would return to Korea and not find themselves behind in their studies compared to their fellow classmates.

 

I also had a little girl in my class when I taught first grade at a private school - an academically rigorous private school. She was an excellent student. She and her brother spent 9 hours every single Saturday in 'Korean School' - so they were in school 6 full days a week.

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Interesting article.

 

She did share with me that one of the biggest concerns of her Korean friends who were here in the US for a period of time was the sorry state of our schools (their words).

 

She and her brother spent 9 hours every single Saturday in 'Korean School' - so they were in school 6 full days a week.

 

 

See, that's the thing though, it doesn't sound like we would want our schools to be like Korean schools either. There has to be some answer between "sorry" and insanity.

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See, that's the thing though, it doesn't sound like we would want our schools to be like Korean schools either. There has to be some answer between "sorry" and insanity.

 

In TOTAL agreement with you.:iagree::iagree::iagree:

 

I am beginning to think that perhaps the answer floats around 'intelligent, balanced homeschooling.'

 

Truthfully, though, I don't know. I do know that after-schooling is not an answer for us -- the last thing my kids wanted to do after being in a classroom all day was to come home and do more schoolwork.

 

My kids were enrolled in an academically rigorous (very rigorous) private school for a few years. The academics were totally to my liking -- the annoying social situations were the same pretty much as what we found in public school.

 

We watched many families remove their children from the school and gravitate to classical conversations' groups. I resisted that for about three years, but now, having finally joined a CC group, I do see why families from THAT school would view CC as an excellent alternative.

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I was reading the news story out loud to the kids at the bus stop today. They love my weird stories in the morning.

 

I'm like a little coach in the morning there and get them all worked up to go to school and do a good job and do their best...lol..rah..go team.

 

I told them "see, you have it easy, but don't forget, these are the people you will be working with or for one day.."

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From the article:

 

"South Korean kids gorge themselves on studying for one reason: to get into one of the country's top universities. .. "Where you attend university haunts you for the rest of your life," says Lee Beom".

 

This is one key difference between the US and Korean/Japanese education systems. In the Japanese system (at least what I've heard), a prestigious university makes it easier to get a good job, whereas they may not even consider applicants from the lower-ranked universities.

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