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California Cantaloupe?


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Avoiding cantelopes is an irrational response. Cantelopes do not have some particular predisposition to get listeria on them. All fresh fruits and vegetables need to be avoided in that case if you want to avoid Listeria. Also, do not eat deli meat or prepackaged deli meat without heating it to steaming, etc.

 

 

If you want to avoid bacterial infections from fresh fruit and vegetables on the other hand, WASH it. It's as simple as that. If you want, use a vegetable spray. Melons should be washed before cutting. A lot of people don't do that. They slice right through the rind, which at a minimum has been in contact with the soil, and into their fruit. Most of the time it does no harm. It's just if there were bacteria in the dirt that there is a problem. I don't know why melon is considered different that say a cucumber, but I've always seen folks wash cukes before preparing them and never seen anyone wash a melon first.

 

Really, to be safe, you should wash all your own stuff including the prewashed packaged produce.

 

And if you are immune-compromised, pregnant, feeding a baby, or elderly, you really should heat your deli meats to steaming prior to serving. (You can serve them cold; just heat them to steaming once. )

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Avoiding cantelopes is an irrational response. Cantelopes do not have some particular predisposition to get listeria on them. All fresh fruits and vegetables need to be avoided in that case if you want to avoid Listeria. Also, do not eat deli meat or prepackaged deli meat without heating it to steaming, etc.

 

 

If you want to avoid bacterial infections from fresh fruit and vegetables on the other hand, WASH it. It's as simple as that. If you want, use a vegetable spray. Melons should be washed before cutting. A lot of people don't do that. They slice right through the rind, which at a minimum has been in contact with the soil, and into their fruit. Most of the time it does no harm. It's just if there were bacteria in the dirt that there is a problem. I don't know why melon is considered different that say a cucumber, but I've always seen folks wash cukes before preparing them and never seen anyone wash a melon first.

 

Really, to be safe, you should wash all your own stuff including the prewashed packaged produce.

 

And if you are immune-compromised, pregnant, feeding a baby, or elderly, you really should heat your deli meats to steaming prior to serving. (You can serve them cold; just heat them to steaming once. )

 

The article I read stated that washing the outside of a cantaloupe was insufficient protection against listeria--it can be on the inside of the fruit, too. From what I understand (from other articles), the bacteria can also be transferred by sharing the same shelf space or truck space, etc.

 

And the way that food is shipped--I mean, why would CA & CO be swapping melons? Wouldn't it be cheaper to keep the food at home? But nobody seems completely sure what's gone where. So I just trust the grocery guy at Kroger that these melons are from CA, not CO? That's probably reasonable, but given the contamination potential AND the stakes...doesn't seem too irrational to me!

 

The exception would be organic, where the whole process has been carefully monitored.

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