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TXMary2
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...."reading" programs like BJU and Abeka offer? When I was a kid we had "reading" books full of short stories, poems and plays. There was usually a workbook or comprehension questions that had to be answered. When I was a new homeschooler I used BJU reading programs - 4th and 5th grade. I stopped using them because I wanted more time to read actual books instead of snippets from them. However, I can't help feeling my youngest may be missing out on a little something.

 

I know they don't really fit the classical model, but I am still considering something for every now and then usage. We just recently started using WWE, do you think this will fill that need?

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I know nothing about WWE, but I like Abeka readers for kids just starting out. It worked SO well for my girls, really cementing what they learned in the phonics book.

 

That said, now they are reading the 2nd and 3rd grade readers, and we aren't doing them every day. We are interspersing those with books rec'd by ToG for history. As the girls become stronger readers, we won't be relying on Abeka as much, even though we own the readers through 4th grade (because of a gracious, precious stranger who sent them to us!) I think we *might* use them all eventually, because I like the character issues the books highlight, but they won't be a must.

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I'm not really acquainted with BJU or Abeka (we're in the UK). I have DS7 read twice a day from a book of his choice (he's currently reading Magic Tree House books). We're also doing WWE 1 and he definitely benefits from the comprehension questions at the end of those passages. Quite often when he reads from his own books he'll suddenly stop and ask me what's going on because "I wasn't really listening to myself" :lol: Bless him, the effort of reading is such that he sometimes just can't take in the overall meaning. I also love WWE because it gives him a taster of books that he might like to read in their entirety. This definitely worked very well for DS10 when he started WWE 3.

 

Best wishes

 

Cassy

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10 years ago I would have said no. My first few kids had no problem learning to read. They learned their phonic rules and jumped into chapter books. My last two didn't have such an easy time learning to read. I had several of those textbooks (that I happened to stumble upon at Goodwill) and they were wonderful for my girls. They provided manageable chunks of reading.

 

So as with most things, I think there is a time and a place for them.

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I have used some of BJU's elementary programs with my children. I really like them because I feel like it covers things I would forget to cover by myself. I do find that I don't use every story or every page. I pick and choose based on the topic and the ideas on the worktext pages. At my ds's level (3rd) there's good phonics review included as well. If you are in a state that requires standardized testing, it's very good test prep. It includes stories, non-fiction selections, poems, historical fiction, and short plays (my son's favorite thing). BJU reading is usually one of the first things my ds will choose to do. He also reads plenty of real books.

 

I can't speak for A Beka reading because I don't care for A Beka, except how they teach blending.

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I haven't used BJU or Abeka's reading program, but my ds LOVES CLE Reading. Whenever I consider dropping it, ds said he'd rather do it ON HIS OWN TIME than drop it! We kept it. :)

 

It *does* teach much that is NOT in WWE. Check out the Reading section of CLE's Scope and Sequence.

 

Ds reads for 2 hours a day, but we have no plans of dropping CLE Reading. :)

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It is not necessary to use vocabulary-controlled basal readers like those published by ABeka, BJUP, Pathway, and others.

 

If you teach your dc to read with a good phonics method, there's no reason your dc cannot read trade books (books you'd find in the library or in a bookstore).

 

Many children enjoy reading vocabulary-controlled basal readers; it just isn't *necessary* to their success for them to use the readers.

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...."reading" programs like BJU and Abeka offer? When I was a kid we had "reading" books full of short stories, poems and plays. There was usually a workbook or comprehension questions that had to be answered. When I was a new homeschooler I used BJU reading programs - 4th and 5th grade. I stopped using them because I wanted more time to read actual books instead of snippets from them. However, I can't help feeling my youngest may be missing out on a little something.

 

I know they don't really fit the classical model, but I am still considering something for every now and then usage. We just recently started using WWE, do you think this will fill that need?

 

Well you can look at it from two ways. DD didn't enjoy reading so manageable chunks of reading through CLE or BJU did wonders for her. She now reads to a point I can't keep up. I also like to save chapter books for her enjoyment as opposed to killing her favorite chapter books and picking them apart. So I love BJU or CLE Reading programs.

 

BJU does a great job at using all genres. DITHOR does as well using chapter books. But I have answers in BJU and I don't in Dithor. Comprehension or narration isn't complete IMO for reading. It's not all about comprehension.

 

But we use HOD where we use oodles of chapter books for other things than a reading program. Living books (chapter books are the brunt of our history and science) are our main program. So you may want to decide that if you use the textbook approach in general, using chapter books for reading may very well be a big benefit as it introduces this type of reading.

 

So I say use what works for your child.

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I don't think they are necessary. TWTM's emphasis on narration replaces the need for reading programs. You know whether your child comprehended the passage based on his/her narration.

 

I'm sure the programs could be enjoyable, but for us, they would just be a busywork distraction.

 

Tara

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OK- thanks everyone. I figured it wasn't necessary - so I guess I can just use what I have on hand if there is a particular story I'd like him to read. My goal is that he fall in love with reading. He loves to be read to and I am hoping that means he will love to read.

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