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k12 Getting stressed out


hollywoodstar09
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Hi everyone. I'm posting this because I'm getting stressed out with the AZVA the charter school out state has for k12. I feel ALL we do is classwork. My son is also special needs and this is not tailored to him. I talked to his teacher and she said she'd get back to me in two weeks, and she also wanted me to document whatever problems I see. I want to do home-school as I fear my son will be bullied in a regular school, and I can't afford to do anything else right now. Any suggestions from other experienced parents about what to do to destress? Today was the first day in 3 that I changed my clothes. I'm that stressed. Any help is appreciated. I just feel I was lied to about the amount of work he'd do when I called the enrollment number.:glare:

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Yes, it is a lot of work. DS 15 is in the program. Although I don't have major issues right now, there are some things that could be better, particularly communication. We were told that we were not formally enrolled, yet we received phone calls from the teachers wanting to know why he had not logged in, completed two weeks worth of coursework. He is now playing catch up, which I hate.

 

There should be support for you and your ds. I would call and e-mail until I received the response I needed.

 

It is not perfect, but it is the only way ds can homeschool right now. He needs that accountability. For what it's worth, he has done more with science in the past few weeks than he has in the past four years of a very demanding public school. It made me sad to realize that ds had never used a microscope before. I just assumed (bad on my part) that he was getting the same education that I had when I was in middle school.

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Hi everyone. I'm posting this because I'm getting stressed out with the AZVA the charter school out state has for k12. I feel ALL we do is classwork. My son is also special needs and this is not tailored to him. I talked to his teacher and she said she'd get back to me in two weeks, and she also wanted me to document whatever problems I see. I want to do home-school as I fear my son will be bullied in a regular school, and I can't afford to do anything else right now. Any suggestions from other experienced parents about what to do to destress? Today was the first day in 3 that I changed my clothes. I'm that stressed. Any help is appreciated. I just feel I was lied to about the amount of work he'd do when I called the enrollment number.:glare:

 

:grouphug:

I was here last year, with a special kid as well. First, I had to slow down... Don't feel you have to keep up with their plan, especially at the beginning.

 

After weeks of tears over math, our teacher moved us a grade level down.

After another month of tears, I switched him to math mammoth and my dear mother went in and took the k12 tests.

 

We got through the year but, I followed my own schedule and if their curriculum absolutely didn't work for us, I started to switch it out and just checked boxes. By the end of the year, he had grown leaps and bounds and the teacher, who was wonderful, never even knew what we switched out and what we didn't.

 

This year, we are homeschooling and it has been so much more peaceful. Go ahead and PM me if you need more specific help on modifying k12.

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Oh, sorry, I missed your post about switching to the charter school. K12 is a lot of work and the initial learning curve is huge. Plus, having a special needs child in that curriculum is not necessarily a good match, certainly not in my experience.

 

I hope things work out well with the school. :001_smile:

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I did k12 last year as an independent purchaser of the curric -- not through a virtual school. I soooo feel your pain. I felt overwhelmed -- and I wasn't even accountable to a teacher!

 

Here's my practical advice: if you can "assess" out of a lesson, go for it. By that I mean, go right to the assessment and see if the child can master it at 80%. If not, then go back to spend time teaching the lesson.

 

Here's my mental health advice: relax. Easy for me to say, right? But seriously, try to settle yourself. It's totally reasonable to feel overwhelmed -- this is all new to you, right? Don't feel shame because the learning curve is HUGE! Be your best advocate and get the help from your teacher.

 

Finally, my Plan B advice: maybe this isn't the best fit. By all means, give it a few weeks to get a handle on it. But there's no shame in letting go of it if it's interfering with your life, rather than enriching it. Looking back, I wish I would've tossed the curric and gone with my Plan B: just math, writing, all kinds of reading, and play with my kids rather than put our family through agony by sticking with k12 when it just wasn't the best fit for us.

 

Best wishes!

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I feel your pain, we used a k12 school for 1st though about half of 4th grade and it was MISERABLE. They love to tell you its tailored to each child but its not. Its still their materials, they just adjust the grade levels for various subjects. Its a wonderful program for bright auditory learners but an absolute nightmare for visual learners. Were using a parent choice charter school now and I get to pick the materials and they foot the bills. I soooooo wish I had found this charter school years ago! I thought my only options were K12, Connections or another charter that wanted tons of busy work. Now I pretty much HS how I want using materials that work for my child instead of trying to modify their stuff to fit my child.

 

If your in CA, check out the IEM charter schools. http://www.ieminc.org

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Hi everyone. I'm posting this because I'm getting stressed out with the AZVA the charter school out state has for k12. I feel ALL we do is classwork. My son is also special needs and this is not tailored to him. I talked to his teacher and she said she'd get back to me in two weeks, and she also wanted me to document whatever problems I see. I want to do home-school as I fear my son will be bullied in a regular school, and I can't afford to do anything else right now. Any suggestions from other experienced parents about what to do to destress? Today was the first day in 3 that I changed my clothes. I'm that stressed. Any help is appreciated. I just feel I was lied to about the amount of work he'd do when I called the enrollment number.:glare:

 

Generally with K12 Vas -- focus on teaching the objectives and don't try to cover ALL the materials or worry about time. Just focus on the assessments and objectives...and try to have fun.

 

My exp with AZVA is the VA put so much extra junk on the parents...I felt like they didn't trust the parent or the K12 curriculum. My girls were in the gifted program but the admin treated me like I was a juvenile delinquent and the teachers acted like cheerleaders. They even have an honor roll for parents...what am I 12? :tongue_smilie: After a few months I decided I was better off just homeschooling.

 

AZ is a ridiculously easy state to homeschool in and there are tons of charter and virtual schools. You can withdraw from AZVA at any time. You have to return supplies and texts, but you do get to keep the student/teacher pages and workbooks which with the book lists would be plenty to get you through the first almost year or homeschooling. Just another option.

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:grouphug:

 

You don't have to spend a truckload of money to homeschool. I'm sure we could all make suggestions on what to use so that you could kiss that public-school-at-home good-bye.

 

:iagree:

 

I think it's been said on here many times that it is possible to homeschool with only a library card, some notebooks, and a math and grammar program. There are many math and grammar programs available for free online, or even more which an be bought used inexpensively. The people on this board are wonderful, and are always willing to help. Please don't let yourself get so stressed that you're not taking care of yourself. My motto is, "You've gotta take care of yourself first, so that you can take care of others."

Edited by Poke Salad Annie
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Well, I decided on a public charter school for my son. Looking at it next week, I hope. This was way too much stress for a home-school that wasn't supposed to be a home-school.

 

I'm sorry you had a bad experience. For what it's worth, simply homeschooling a young child is way less stressful than that. And it doesn't need to be expensive, either.

 

Good luck with the charter school!

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Are you doing every last activity and worksheet? K12 says that all of that stuff is there to give you choices about what to have your child do. They say you should only be doing what works for your child.

 

This may not be how the virtual academy views things though.

 

And it is also *very* difficult for a newly homeschooling parent to figure out what is appropriate and what isn't. I think this is the biggest problem with K12, that they make it seem like it will be a no brainer for a parent to use their program but they really make it much more difficult by giving so many work "choices."

 

There is a K12 users Yahoo group that might be able to help. Also, find out from your VA exactly what they want to see in terms of work examples. Then work back from that to something you and your son can live with.

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It's been my observation that a lot of folks new to HS start out with K12 but leave after a semester or a year for a more flexible virtual charter that provides a stipend for the curricula and classes of the parents' choice. I don't know if AZ has any of those, but if so, I would encourage you to make the switch after this semester is up.

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Oh, sorry, I missed your post about switching to the charter school. K12 is a lot of work and the initial learning curve is huge. Plus, having a special needs child in that curriculum is not necessarily a good match, certainly not in my experience.

 

I hope things work out well with the school. :001_smile:

 

My friend who teaches preschool is pressing me to stick with it. Since we've started I don't know if we should continue or switch to charter school. DS really seems to like it. I'm just so scared that he'll fall behind further. Its only recently that I thought a special needs child could be home-schooled. I want to stick with it, but I need to find the best way to do so. And make sure he makes progress.

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I did k12 last year as an independent purchaser of the curric -- not through a virtual school. I soooo feel your pain. I felt overwhelmed -- and I wasn't even accountable to a teacher!

 

Here's my practical advice: if you can "assess" out of a lesson, go for it. By that I mean, go right to the assessment and see if the child can master it at 80%. If not, then go back to spend time teaching the lesson.

 

Here's my mental health advice: relax. Easy for me to say, right? But seriously, try to settle yourself. It's totally reasonable to feel overwhelmed -- this is all new to you, right? Don't feel shame because the learning curve is HUGE! Be your best advocate and get the help from your teacher.

 

Finally, my Plan B advice: maybe this isn't the best fit. By all means, give it a few weeks to get a handle on it. But there's no shame in letting go of it if it's interfering with your life, rather than enriching it. Looking back, I wish I would've tossed the curric and gone with my Plan B: just math, writing, all kinds of reading, and play with my kids rather than put our family through agony by sticking with k12 when it just wasn't the best fit for us.

 

Best wishes!

 

Thank you for your kind words. I knew I had a problem when I saw a reviewer of the k12 school saying all the things I saw saying lol. Stressed, not able to do anything but school work. She saw sounding just like me. I feel better today. And I feel committed to homeschooling. Just not maybe with k12. If need be, I have the charter school as my plan b. I don't know how to get started with independently homeschooling however, or what hoops my state (az) will put me through.

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I feel your pain.

 

I had 2 kids in a K12 State Virtual Academy...

 

Last year was great. This year they started off with mandatory class connects, and since my son was accelerated in several subjects he was expected to attend both grade level equivalents...Then as a parent we were notified of manadatory grade level conferences, individual parent conferences, and class conferences for each kid, each month. This didn't even take into effect the Testing Prep and review they said would start in January...Multiply that by 2 kids, one of whom has special needs (and the special ed class connects to go with it) and I knew there was no way we could add over 10 hours of mandatory "online" class "busy" work to our schedule.

 

I am/was one of those moms who ONLY taught the objective in the K12 lessons and heavily supplemented due to education needs (VSL for one kid and Special Needs for the other) Even doing this our day would run long if we wanted to cover everything.

 

Since I already supplemented for Latin and Literature and Math...I realized I might as well just bite the bullet and drop the Virtual Academy...

 

I did this a week ago.

 

Our day is much less stressed and the kids are enjoying being able to just breathe and read all day if they want. (We are waiting on a large book order to arrive with curriculum material)

 

This week we found out that we can actually enjoy our science project instead of rushing through it, and we can finally say goodbye to the K12 Pre-Algebra (Which caused my 6th grade math loving son to cry) and K12 Phonics (Which caused my dyslexic 6 year old to hate even the idea of reading...we dropped it and went with OPGtR and we are making progress after only a few weeks)

 

Again I want to stress, last year with the Academy was GREAT. I sent in monthly work samples, contacted the teacher if I had a question and attended 1 class connect each week with each kid....I'm not sure why they changed the program...but the new model just didn't work for us.

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:grouphug:

 

You don't have to spend a truckload of money to homeschool. I'm sure we could all make suggestions on what to use so that you could kiss that public-school-at-home good-bye.

 

My ears are open! :bigear: I want to do what's best for DS. I'm just not liking what I see at k12. The sales pitch and the reality are two different things!

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Generally with K12 Vas -- focus on teaching the objectives and don't try to cover ALL the materials or worry about time. Just focus on the assessments and objectives...and try to have fun.

 

My exp with AZVA is the VA put so much extra junk on the parents...I felt like they didn't trust the parent or the K12 curriculum. My girls were in the gifted program but the admin treated me like I was a juvenile delinquent and the teachers acted like cheerleaders. They even have an honor roll for parents...what am I 12? :tongue_smilie: After a few months I decided I was better off just homeschooling.

 

AZ is a ridiculously easy state to homeschool in and there are tons of charter and virtual schools. You can withdraw from AZVA at any time. You have to return supplies and texts, but you do get to keep the student/teacher pages and workbooks which with the book lists would be plenty to get you through the first almost year or homeschooling. Just another option.

 

Wow parent honor roll?! Our first week they were emailing me about attendance. Odd considering we had no materials, and once we got on it, nothing to do on the main page. Yet they hassled me. Are there any free virtual schools in AZ besides AZVA that you'd recommend?

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Wow Xanadu. I wish I could have sent ds then. This has been crazy. They present it a certain way and it ends up being different. My son loves to read but language arts kindergarten makes him cringe. Today we watched a video for the class time about the story. This class expects him to read the story 2+ days in a row. He gets bored then he checks out mentally. Later when I ask questions, he's been daydreaming so he has no idea!

 

Some days, we don't have time for class connect. I feel bad if we don't go everyday. I wonder what made them change things? Maybe kids were getting behind? When I signed up, the representative said ds would be ahead this time next year. If this continues, he'll be behind! Oh, and he hates the phonics class too lol.

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Wow, I've just found out about 2 more, at least, charter schools that are online for AZ. I thought AZVA was the only show in town. I like Mercury as I can pick the curriculum, and ds would get a laptop. I asked for more info from Mercury and connections, and will keep you guys posted. Thank you so much for all the lovely suggestions I received from everyone here. They helped me breathe and take a step back. I like homeschooling just not with AZVA! I feel I can get things done and make this positive for both of us.

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Here are some ways to make homeschooling work for a special needs child (especially if you use a virtual academy):

 

Teach to the objective not the lesson. (Don't spend an hour trying to teach an hour lesson with activities if you can show/teach your kid in a manner they understand that is not only better but probably faster too. Or If you do use the lesson/guidelines don't do everything, just teach until the subject is mastered not until they are ready to cry from boredom) For example my daughter understood double digit math after after a few example...She tested out and was done in 15 minutes, not 60. Our VA allowed us to count the full hour even if a subject is mastered sooner so as not to penalize fast learners.

 

If they know it...Skip the Lesson & TEST OUT...Mark the lesson complete and add the time in attendance as if they had to do it. (This is how our VA told us to document hours if they already knew the material. Check with your VA to ensure the rules are the same. If this doesn't apply to you, still test out. You'll make up the hours elsewhere with a special needs child.)

 

Save Writing for Language/Composition. Do all other questions/busywork orally. Yes this is allowed and for special needs kids who are dyslexic or dysgraphic it makes a world of difference when they suddenly don't hate history just because they have to write out all the answers. (***Find audio format for long texts if you can.....We found the audio book format for Hakim's History of US and it was such a time/tear saver)

 

Follow IEP Accommodations. If you have an IEP from a previous B&M school that mentions reading/testing/writing accommodations you can provide the same, even during Lesson Assessments and TESTS. (Everything from reading the questions to allowing a calculator) If you don't have an IEP......get one. The virtual academies are public schools, they legally have to provide an assessment, IEP evaluation, board..the works. (My son went up for his 3 year re-certification in addition to the usually yearly stuff associated with an IEP and our VA handled it all)

 

Block Schedule to Free up your Day. Do 2 Science on Wed, 2 or 3 History on Monday and 2 or 3 Art/Music on Friday, saving extra writing/composition work or whatever your child struggles with for Tuesday and Thursday. This leaves Literature, Language & Math Daily. (Grades past 3rd will probably have to do history daily...it just depends on the number of lessons and range of the material). Using a Block schedule SAVED my sanity with 2 kids in K12, especially since their science/history were so very different. If This is still to much you can always keep it down to the Basics: Math, Lit/Language & History M-F and Do Art/Music & Science on the Weekends as a family fun type experience. (We did this a few times on busy weeks and the kids loved dad being able to take part, and having 2 parents meant the project went much faster).

 

You can successfully teach a special needs child at home....you just have to find the method that works for you, and more importantly works for your child.

Edited by Xanadu
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Some days, we don't have time for class connect. I feel bad if we don't go everyday. I wonder what made them change things? Maybe kids were getting behind? When I signed up, the representative said ds would be ahead this time next year. If this continues, he'll be behind! Oh, and he hates the phonics class too lol.

 

 

Did they end up in PI status? That could have triggered it. I know CAVA did and the changes as a result were nuts. I was happy to leave.

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Wow Xanadu. I wish I could have sent ds then. This has been crazy. They present it a certain way and it ends up being different. My son loves to read but language arts kindergarten makes him cringe. Today we watched a video for the class time about the story. This class expects him to read the story 2+ days in a row. He gets bored then he checks out mentally. Later when I ask questions, he's been daydreaming so he has no idea!

 

Some days, we don't have time for class connect. I feel bad if we don't go everyday. I wonder what made them change things? Maybe kids were getting behind? When I signed up, the representative said ds would be ahead this time next year. If this continues, he'll be behind! Oh, and he hates the phonics class too lol.

 

The thing is we had class connects last year and missed them all the time...*lol*...Both my kids passed their end of year testing just fine. Don't worry about that..*smile*

 

Making the class connects mandatory this year changed everything.

 

Being told I had to force my child, who had already mastered the material to sit in front of a computer for hours of "busy" work a week just to meet some administrative standard didn't feel right.

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The thing is we had class connects last year and missed them all the time...*lol*...Both my kids passed their end of year testing just fine. Don't worry about that..*smile*

 

Making the class connects mandatory this year changed everything.

 

Being told I had to force my child, who had already mastered the material to sit in front of a computer for hours of "busy" work a week just to meet some administrative standard didn't feel right.

 

What's crazy is that the sales rep pushed the idea that there would be no busy work with this curriculum. It seems like we do lots of busy work.

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Wow, I've just found out about 2 more, at least, charter schools that are online for AZ. I thought AZVA was the only show in town. I like Mercury as I can pick the curriculum, and ds would get a laptop. I asked for more info from Mercury and connections, and will keep you guys posted. Thank you so much for all the lovely suggestions I received from everyone here. They helped me breathe and take a step back. I like homeschooling just not with AZVA! I feel I can get things done and make this positive for both of us.

There are always strings attached. Nothing is free.

 

Why not homeschool--really homeschool, not government-school-at-home? That's where you'll find the most freedom, not just stuff that's free.

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There are always strings attached. Nothing is free.

 

Why not homeschool--really homeschool, not government-school-at-home? That's where you'll find the most freedom, not just stuff that's free.

 

Considering it. I called Connections and did not like the way the rep pushed me off the phone. Mercury did the same but was nicer about it. A big thing is the free computer as I use it a lot to access resources for ds to use for school. We don't have our own. Is it possible to do this without a home computer?

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My ears are open! :bigear: I want to do what's best for DS. I'm just not liking what I see at k12. The sales pitch and the reality are two different things!

 

Sorry if I missed this somewhere in the thread, but I'm assuming that your ds is in kindergarten? Could you tell us more about his skill level--if so, we could know better what suggestions to offer?

 

For example, one free suggestion for reading would be Tanglewood's Really Reading program.

 

Also, math could definitely be done very inexpensively at the K-level, and free handwriting sheets are fairly easily to find online as well.

 

Really, kindergarten should be a fairly low-stress year, as the major focus should be on the 3 Rs...everything else is icing on the cake!

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Considering it. I called Connections and did not like the way the rep pushed me off the phone. Mercury did the same but was nicer about it. A big thing is the free computer as I use it a lot to access resources for ds to use for school. We don't have our own. Is it possible to do this without a home computer?

Girl, millions of people still don't have computers. Leonardo da Vinci didn't have a computer. Einstein didn't have a computer (well, not a home computer like today's computers, lol). The last thing that would keep me from homeschooling would be lack of a computer.

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We just started First Grade K12 music today and I'm already stressed out! So many parts and pieces, worksheets, various CDs and DVDs and it seems not as streamlined as I was hoping.

 

Anyway, I am so sorry. :grouphug: My brief exposure to K12 has me stressed so I can only imagine having to use its curriculum in its entirety with a child who is not able to manage it for themselves. I hope they can offer you some options to make it more usable.

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We just started First Grade K12 music today and I'm already stressed out! So many parts and pieces, worksheets, various CDs and DVDs and it seems not as streamlined as I was hoping.

 

Anyway, I am so sorry. :grouphug: My brief exposure to K12 has me stressed so I can only imagine having to use its curriculum in its entirety with a child who is not able to manage it for themselves. I hope they can offer you some options to make it more usable.

 

I think K12 Music has to be the most universally loathed subject by anyone in a VA....at least everyone on the K12's Parent's Lounge Forum hated it. I honestly can't think of anyone who ever commented kindly on it....My 6 year old HATED the video's of the "crazy lady doing wierd dances"....*smile* Most of us just started sticking in a classical CD or substituting Instrument lessons and checking off the time...I did both, but our VA allowed that since the music was an elective...YMMV with your VA.

 

The irony is what they send you to 3 videos, 2 songs and a couple of worksheets can be summed up with this..."Can you make a high sound...now make a low sound...(Lesson one complete) or Clap, Clap, Stomp, Stomp, Clap...This is a rhythm can you make your own rhythm (Lesson two complete)...:smilielol5:

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Wow Xanadu. I wish I could have sent ds then. This has been crazy. They present it a certain way and it ends up being different. My son loves to read but language arts kindergarten makes him cringe. Today we watched a video for the class time about the story. This class expects him to read the story 2+ days in a row. He gets bored then he checks out mentally. Later when I ask questions, he's been daydreaming so he has no idea!

 

Some days, we don't have time for class connect. I feel bad if we don't go everyday. I wonder what made them change things? Maybe kids were getting behind? When I signed up, the representative said ds would be ahead this time next year. If this continues, he'll be behind! Oh, and he hates the phonics class too lol.

 

 

If you stick with k12 make sure you read through what needs to be learned from the phonics lesson and skip anything he already knows. There is no need to torture him with the phonics if it's not accomplishing anything. What we did last year was to read through the parts of the 4 lessons that were important and do some of the worksheets all in one day and then typically do the unit test another day. Makes it easy since you are doing all the phonics in 2 days and then that leaves 3 days of no phonics :)

 

For LA we did not do the rereadings every time. We would just (and still do in 1st and 2nd sometimes) do multiple lessons in one day. I think at most we read 2 times not the 4 days that it wanted some times. My daughter could just tell me about it on the 2nd day and show she remembered the story by answering some of the questions and i'd call it good.

 

It doesn't have to be stressful - just remember you do NOT have to do all of the lesson. Just do the parts needed to pass the assessment and meet objectives and call it good.

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There are always strings attached. Nothing is free.

 

Why not homeschool--really homeschool, not government-school-at-home? That's where you'll find the most freedom, not just stuff that's free.

 

The Mercury school fed-exed their packet today. I'm not liking it more than the one he's at now (k12). They seem MORE not less invasive. They ask for Vax proof. Really what online charter school needs that, if not to enforce government vaccination programs. I think we might just stick it out this year and supplement as much as we can. As long as he gets the objective, that's fine with me! Next year I will be investing in either a good home-school curriculum, or a good nurturing local charter, coop or community school. I've been going crazy reading all the threads here and looking up the resources suggested here. I've learned so much! I wish I'd seen this site before I agreed to the k12 program.

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Sorry if I missed this somewhere in the thread, but I'm assuming that your ds is in kindergarten? Could you tell us more about his skill level--if so, we could know better what suggestions to offer?

 

For example, one free suggestion for reading would be Tanglewood's Really Reading program.

 

Also, math could definitely be done very inexpensively at the K-level, and free handwriting sheets are fairly easily to find online as well.

 

Really, kindergarten should be a fairly low-stress year, as the major focus should be on the 3 Rs...everything else is icing on the cake!

 

Yes my ds is in kindergarten. He is at level when it comes to math. And usually at level when it comes to reading comprehension (though the k12 language arts seems to bore him). He is below level for phonics, history and social studies. And he is at level with writing. He just needs more practice. His speech was diagnosed at moderate to severe. I also feel he has a retention problem as we always are repeating the same stuff over and over. He doesn't know his numbers and abcs well, though we work on it a lot. Sometimes I tell him stuff, question him, and ten seconds later he has no idea what we talked about!

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Girl, millions of people still don't have computers. Leonardo da Vinci didn't have a computer. Einstein didn't have a computer (well, not a home computer like today's computers, lol). The last thing that would keep me from homeschooling would be lack of a computer.

 

Lol I know! I'm a techie and I love my technology. I've been using computers since elementary school. They make life somewhat easier, but you're right. Most people worldwide don't have one, but they manage to learn.

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We just started First Grade K12 music today and I'm already stressed out! So many parts and pieces, worksheets, various CDs and DVDs and it seems not as streamlined as I was hoping.

 

Anyway, I am so sorry. :grouphug: My brief exposure to K12 has me stressed so I can only imagine having to use its curriculum in its entirety with a child who is not able to manage it for themselves. I hope they can offer you some options to make it more usable.

 

Have you gone to the parents lounge on the k12 support site? They have a section for stressed out learning coaches. It seems everyone who starts is stressed. The reps make it seem doable but the reality is hard. Its not very streamlined, and it seems too repetitive sometimes.

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I think K12 Music has to be the most universally loathed subject by anyone in a VA....at least everyone on the K12's Parent's Lounge Forum hated it. I honestly can't think of anyone who ever commented kindly on it....My 6 year old HATED the video's of the "crazy lady doing wierd dances"....*smile* Most of us just started sticking in a classical CD or substituting Instrument lessons and checking off the time...I did both, but our VA allowed that since the music was an elective...YMMV with your VA.

 

The irony is what they send you to 3 videos, 2 songs and a couple of worksheets can be summed up with this..."Can you make a high sound...now make a low sound...(Lesson one complete) or Clap, Clap, Stomp, Stomp, Clap...This is a rhythm can you make your own rhythm (Lesson two complete)...:smilielol5:

 

:rofl::rofl::rofl::smilielol5::blink:

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PI = Program Improvement. Schools that don't meet their API/AYP goals (Academic Performance Index/Adequate Yearly Progress) on the state tests are put into this mode. Schools have two years to make improvements and remediations for all students to achieve proficiency.

 

Wow, after all that jargon, a library card sounds great.

 

We are new to k12 this year, and yes, it does have its problems. There were a lot of negative reviews that we questioned at the info sessions. Unfortunately, now some of these apparently are true. DS was just enrolled in two additional courses, one being Spanish, that we definitely did not request. Getting a call back is very frustrating.

 

On the plus side, he loves the science and the experiements.

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Yes my ds is in kindergarten. He is at level when it comes to math. And usually at level when it comes to reading comprehension (though the k12 language arts seems to bore him). He is below level for phonics, history and social studies. And he is at level with writing. He just needs more practice. His speech was diagnosed at moderate to severe. I also feel he has a retention problem as we always are repeating the same stuff over and over. He doesn't know his numbers and abcs well, though we work on it a lot. Sometimes I tell him stuff, question him, and ten seconds later he has no idea what we talked about!

 

 

Well, again, if you are needing free materials, you could try the above mentioned Tanglewood Really Reading program, or you could utilize Starfall online. Since you feel he is not retaining well, perhaps you could use both--a varied approach might help with that.

 

For math, both IXL and Aleks offer free trials that could get you started. Also, here is a site that provides links for making worksheets, etc.

 

Other than that, I still maintain that kindergarten should be focused on laying a solid foundation in the 3 R's-- and that need not be a hugely stressful endeavor at all. Beyond those skill subjects, one could easily make use of the library for science, reading and history.

 

However, if you are at all interested in purchasing an inexpensive, "all-in-one" curriculum, I would suggest looking at either My Father's World or Heart of Dakota. I personally never used either of their kindergarten programs (because I already had phonics and other materials before they came along) but they seem to cover all the bases and I've heard many good reviews of both.

 

HTH as you consider all your options!

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The Mercury school fed-exed their packet today. I'm not liking it more than the one he's at now (k12). They seem MORE not less invasive. They ask for Vax proof. Really what online charter school needs that, if not to enforce government vaccination programs.

But remember: this is PUBLIC SCHOOL. It will require the same things for its home-based students as for its classroom-based students.

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But remember: this is PUBLIC SCHOOL. It will require the same things for its home-based students as for its classroom-based students.

 

Yeah, but that was crazy. I'm liking the idea of independent homeschooling next year more and more. I'm accessing all the free resources I can find, as well as evaluating paid ones. I plan to stick it out this year, supplement as much as I can, and go full independent next year, or find a great local school.

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Yeah, but that was crazy. I'm liking the idea of independent homeschooling next year more and more. I'm accessing all the free resources I can find, as well as evaluating paid ones. I plan to stick it out this year, supplement as much as I can, and go full independent next year, or find a great local school.

 

The trick is to take dc's education seriously, but not so much the curricula. I NEVER read the K12 LA stories more than once with dd. SHe got it, we moved on. I'd read different books on the other days of just mark off all 3-5 lessons in one day. The OBJECTIVE is to read and discuss the story. Teach to that and you'll be fine.

 

Same with music, btw. I LOVED the K12 music, but then I didn't take it too seriously. I liked that they taught the solfege scale. We didn't do the stomp and clap every time, but I loved how much it made dd roll her eyes, yet she had to join in since her sibs had so much fun.

 

To OP -- it's kindie. Focus on reading, math second, and appeasing the VA 3rd. Worst case they kick you out of the VA. My intent was to use a K12 VA for K-2 then go full homeschool. Moving to AZ just moved my timetable up. You can learn a lot by using this year and the provided curriculum to find your teaching style and dc's learning style. Don't be afraid to play a little loose with the curriculum -- as long as you teach to the objectives you'll be fine.

 

Content providers like K12 as well as the companies administering the VA are PRIVATE FOR-PROFIT companies. The extra hoops aren't because of state pr fed government requirements. As far as I know, AZVA met the APY so they are not in any sort of PI issue. They just want better numbers to attract more students to make more money. THere are tons of charter schools and Vas in AZ. So, imo it's corporate greed rather than big brother at fault (at least in THIS case). :p

 

[ETA: Wow. Need to go update my signature! :lol:]

Edited by ChandlerMom
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  • 2 years later...
Guest KatelynC

Hello, my name is Katelyn and I am currently enrolled in k12. (yeah I know this was posted 2 years ago) I'm in the 7th grade and I'm already stressed out (it's only my first week!) the thing I hate the most is math, it's way too confusing and extremely difficult. I got out of my public school because I was being bullied but I think I'd rather be back in my regular public school, honestly. I can tell my dad is also stressed out by it.

Ok, so I'm an advanced student but when I joined k12 I looked at some lessons, everything looked fine until I got to math. :001_huh: The math questions seem like college students should be doing them and they just don't make sense. I also looked at the examples and other things that would help me solve the problems but they only made me more confused. I feel like I was completely lied to when I got into this. I had to convince my dad to put me into k12 now I have to convince him to take me out.  :sad: There's also not many schools in my area and the ones that are are really bad or the kids steal absolutely everything you have (my ipod got stolen once  :angry:) Aaaanyway I've got a bit off topic.

Overall k12 is the worst school (academically) that I've been too.  :thumbdown:

 

:leaving: See ya guys.

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Hello, my name is Katelyn and I am currently enrolled in k12. (yeah I know this was posted 2 years ago) I'm in the 7th grade and I'm already stressed out (it's only my first week!) the thing I hate the most is math, it's way too confusing and extremely difficult. I got out of my public school because I was being bullied but I think I'd rather be back in my regular public school, honestly. I can tell my dad is also stressed out by it.

Ok, so I'm an advanced student but when I joined k12 I looked at some lessons, everything looked fine until I got to math. :001_huh: The math questions seem like college students should be doing them and they just don't make sense. I also looked at the examples and other things that would help me solve the problems but they only made me more confused. I feel like I was completely lied to when I got into this. I had to convince my dad to put me into k12 now I have to convince him to take me out.  :sad: There's also not many schools in my area and the ones that are are really bad or the kids steal absolutely everything you have (my ipod got stolen once  :angry:) Aaaanyway I've got a bit off topic.

Overall k12 is the worst school (academically) that I've been too.  :thumbdown:

 

:leaving: See ya guys.

 

Welcome, Katelyn. :grouphug:

 

Your father has enrolled you in a charter school that uses K12. A charter school is a public school; it's only that the "campus" is in your house. :-)

 

Two things: it could just be that K12's math is different from what you were using in your other school, not that K12 math is bad. I had that same experience a couple of times when I was in school, because my step-father was in the Navy and we moved several times (two schools in 8th grade, two in 10th, two in 11th...ACK!). In other words, there might just be an adjustment period while you wrap your brain around this different math.

 

And it could be that K12 math really is dreadful and the only solution is to get out of K12. I would encourage your father to check in here with us. :-) He would need to find out what the actual homeschool laws are in your state (by enrolling you in the charter school, he does not have to comply with your state's homeschool law, because it is a public school); we'd be glad to discuss options and legal stuff with him.

 

It's almost Christmas vacation--hang in there!

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I agree with Ellie above.

 

I also want to add that a friend of my son's is doing K12 via an online charter, and my understanding is that classes are supposed to be fitted to fit the student (I know that may not be true in practice, but it might be you need a different placement in math and that you can get it).  Also they are supposed to have teachers available to help you with problems you may be having in understanding subjects. So while you may hate K12, do at least try to get whatever help they offer in online (or phone perhaps) explanations of material that is confusing you, and also, if things still seem like they are not at the right level for you, in checking if you are correctly placed in math.

 

Incidentally, I am curious, what sort of math problems are you getting that seem like they should be for college?

 

Welcome and Good luck!

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Hello, my name is Katelyn and I am currently enrolled in k12. (yeah I know this was posted 2 years ago) I'm in the 7th grade and I'm already stressed out (it's only my first week!) the thing I hate the most is math, it's way too confusing and extremely difficult.

Not sure you are just venting or you are looking for advice, so this is just my two cents worth since my older is finishing K12 PreAlgebra.

Assuming that you are talking about the K12 PreAlgebra course,

1) There is math remedial to help students catch up. Talk to the teacher assigned to you for all your courses or the one assigned to you for math or both.  There is Aleks Math, K12 National Math Lab and Study Island available to help students catch up.

2) During the Elluminate sessions which is daily from Tuesday to Friday, teachers do stay on after the class to explain again the concepts that students find confusing.  For example, a session may be allocated an hour but the class finish in 40 mins.  The teacher stay on for another 20mins to help any student who want to stay on. 

3) Read the K12 PreAlgebra textbook and go through all the work examples for topics covered to date and email/Kmail your math teachers for help.

4) Borrow the Glencoe or Holt PreAlgebra textbook from your local library to review, or ask the librarian for what public school textbook they have.

 

Whatever it is, be proactive and get the help you need because the K12 PreAlgebra course is not hard (excluding LDs or not having a good grounding in math from K to 6th grade). 

 

 

 Also they are supposed to have teachers available to help you with problems you may be having in understanding subjects. So while you may hate K12, do at least try to get whatever help they offer in online (or phone perhaps) explanations of material that is confusing you.........

 

Incidentally, I am curious, what sort of math problems are you getting that seem like they should be for college?

 

There is online, phone and in-person help.  The student need to request for phone and in-person help.  Online help is typically given once a student falls behind and can of course be requested.

 

Whether it is the PreAlgebra or Algebra textbook, there is none that should be for college :)

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