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Do you post a daily/weekly schedule/routine for your child?


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The kind that shows what's planned for the day and/or week? Daily, does it show what subjects you'll be working on and what time? Weekly, does it show lessons, playground, assignments due? Is it a checklist? Words or pictures? etc etc

 

DS is *constantly* asking me what we're doing next or what we're doing later in the week and it's driving me crazy! I don't blame him at all for wanting to know, and think maybe if he could see for himself what's scheduled, he wouldn't need to bug me about it! :lol:

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I created a free schedule online at www.cozi.com, and made a color coded schedule for everybody. I can look at the schedule for everybody as a whole, or I can print or look at individual schedules for each person. I give my 6th grader a planner, and even though his schedule is online and printable, I have him write in it to develop his good planning skills. I use TOG and she suggests that you plan with your child the layout of the week and have them write this into the planner and have them check it off when its completed. Even the littles like knowing what to expect that week and Ive thought abt having my 2nd grader do the same once things settle down a bit around here.

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I have a weekly/daily schedule that I have in my binder for myself,

but we use the workbox system for that very reason you mention.

 

My children can clearly see what they have to do each day, how much, and even if they want to look in the boxes to see what it is they will be doing, they can.

 

I can hear "Wow, only 5 boxes today! It's gonna be a short school day, woohoo!", or "Ugh, 10 boxes!"......or even "Why does he only have 6 boxes and I have 8 today".

 

Also with this system, I can somewhat control the order things are done in. They've been "trained" so to speak, to do the boxes in order (kind of natural because the boxes are numbered in order), so I can load this DS's box with an independent subject, while I have the other DS's box loaded with a Mommy-led subject.

Edited by Samiam
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I use the workbox method for that reason. I do have a MOTH schedule, which is more for me. Even though I like the idea of a single word in each slot for the kids. I'll have to do that.

 

Weekly, and to make the workboxes easier to fill, I print the assignment calendar from Homeschool Tracker. I submit & print 5 weeks at a time, then print 2 per side, duplex tumble, so I get 4 "boxes" printed per sheet of paper.

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Yes, my DDs each have their own planners. Each weekend I write down their schedules for the week, so they know all of the assignments/expectations for each day, as well as what outside activities they have.

 

They are like me-- they love checking off the boxes as they do their work. :D

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I used a homeschool planner I bought from Rainbow Resource last year, and on the weekend I'd fill in each day for the upcoming week what each child was going to cover including page numbers. It wasn't super detailed, but they knew what they had to do that day by looking at the planner. http://rainbowresource.com/product/sku/012328/3f23c52ff6a110861df06590

 

For this year (even though I did order a new planner) I'm fiddling around with a planner schedule from http://donnayoung.org/household/fullsize/timers.htm

I'm actually doing that right now to see if I like the hour by hour method better. This year I'll have one more child to plan for, so I want better control over the ORDER they do their subjects in. For example while one child does Saxon math independtly I will do FLL and WWE with a second child. The third one can be doing silent reading. Then we can rotate and I will do language with the first one while the second one goes to math, etc.. Last year was easier b/c I was only juggling two who needed me one-on-one.

Edited by UmMusa
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Mine are young enough that don't care what time of day something is supposed to happen, but they do like a list of which subjects we're covering each day. I include activities like jujitsu, ballet and science classes on the list, but I don't include playgroups, meals, quiet time etc. Mine each have copies of these schedules on the fronts of their binders.

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Yup. Every week I print up a table that shows that the outtings and assignments for both kids each day of the week. I post the schedule on the wall and we check off activities as we do them. Only outside activities have times next to them. The kids get to pick which subjects they do next as long as everything gets done. It helps me stay on track and it helps the kids know what they have to do.

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I created a schedule for my 8 yr son. It is a weekly schedule, star wars theme. My son loves it. We just finished our first week of school and really helped. The week is split into four days, the fifth day we attend classical

conversations. Each day is broken down by subjects and what needs to be done. My son checks off as it is completed. I did not put any times, it can vary for us. I would be happy to email a copy to show you if interested, Allyson

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I use a weekly planner page from donnayoung.org. It is a 5x8 grid, so I list the subjects down the left margin and Mon. - Fri. across the top. I then fill in daily assignments for each subject in the squares. I do not fill in times, however. My dc are free to complete their work in whichever order they prefer, as long as it is done by the end of the week. The daily breakdown is just a guide. I do sometimes make a note of how long each subject should take, though, in order to help them to pace themselves.

 

If my curriculum gives weekly assignments, I break them into manageable chunks across a few days per week. For textbooks and workbooks, I simply divide the number of chapters, lessons or pages by 36 weeks in a school year. This gives me the number of lessons or pages per week. I then distribute subjects evenly throughout the week (most are 2-3 days per week, with the exception of math and lit.).

 

My dc each have a clipboard where their weekly assignment sheet lives. They cross or check off assignments as they are completed. I also clip any loose papers, like worksheets, that are to be done that week, to that board as well, beneath the assignment sheet. A binder could serve the same purpose. Once the week is done, I file the sheets in my planning binder, so at the end of the year, I have a complete record of what was accomplished.

 

HTH,

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I just started trial-ing Scholaric.com a last week and think it's just what I need. Super simple to use, can't lose it since it's accessible from anywhere, and you can print each day or each week at a time. New features are still being added since it's a relatively new product, but the developer loves suggestions and emails you back right away. It doesn't have all the features of some of the other free or paid programs, but I really needed something with no ads on it so it's clutter free and my brain can stay organized.

 

I print out the daily schedule and give it to my daughter for now, but I hope to start giving her the weekly schedule soon and give her some flexibility to work ahead. I list the lessons and what is happening during school time in the lesson boxes, and then work that can be done on her own time (homework basically) under the annotations section so it's easy for her to see the difference when I print it out. It's $1 a month per child, and I only need one child "scheduled" for now, but I can see how it's not doable financially for larger families.

 

Nikki

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I make a checklist every day of what's planned. DD likes to know what's coming. Then when we do a task, she can put a sticker on it. She can't read yet, so I use pictures. I just do a google image search for something related to the task and drag an appropriate picture into a word document. We usually have 5-6 pictures on the list, and the first is always reading a picture book.

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I have a spreadsheet that has general "school" time, and other out of the house activities (gymnastics, art, piano, etc).

 

I have weekly assignment charts that tell her what she's working on in what subject.

 

Lots simplier with only one at home - was more complicated when I had multiples, with different outside activities, I had to plan.

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For those of you who plan well ahead, how do you do it? Do you figure it all out during the summer? Is it made easier because you use a scheduled or boxed curriculum? How do you adjust it if things get off schedule? Any tips appreciated. I'd love to get better at making and posting schedules too!:lurk5:

Lakota

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My sons are now 11 and 15, and this year I staged a return to what really has worked well for us. Some elements are from last year, other stuff from previous years. The combination seems to hit all the right notes for everyone, whew. We each have our own copies in our own binder.

 

1. Personal weekly schedule for each person -- kids and mom. It has a mix of clock times and blocks of time that are used differently on different days.

 

The boys start their schoolday with personal & family chore time at 8:30, then do schoolwork in blocks of 30 (younger son), 45, &/or 60 minutes -- with a 10 am tea/cocoa break -- until 12 o'clock. Then we take a one-hour lunch break (how could I have stopped doing that last year?!?), followed by a 1 1/2-hour block for a single subject, and an hour of reading. Each boy's schedule is personalized, and they are set up so MY day is not bonkers :D Their PE classes, music lessons, and Scouts are noted as well.

 

2. Six-week checklist of schoolwork to be done each week, for each boy -- and a copy of each for mom. This is SO HELPFUL for all of us! Every six weeks I look ahead and work out the specifics of what needs to be done in each subject, and create a checklist for each boy.

 

Every day we use the checklist to "do the next thing." We check things off throughout the day, and at the end of the week we can see at a glance where they are in any subject, and whether we need to speed up, make other adjustments, or whatever. Six weeks is the perfect chunk of time for this, for us -- though I'm about to do a four-week checklist because our first two weeks of school are not entirely checklist-able, as we settle into school.

 

I keep my completed checklists with my archive of weekly log pages for each boy, as an "at-a-glance" summary of the schoolwork.

 

I think I have older versions of these documents on my homeschooling blog, under Planning. I think :001_huh:

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I keep a weekly schedule for my use. Only my dd12 is interested in knowing her work for the week. I give her a list of her weekly assignments on Monday so that she can keep track of it in her notebook.

 

For everyone, I keep a checklist on a dry erase board. There is a row for each subject and a column for each child. Each morning I put an x in the subject areas (row) that we aren't doing that day. Then as the child finishes the subject they put an x in their column.

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For those of you who plan well ahead, how do you do it? Do you figure it all out during the summer? Is it made easier because you use a scheduled or boxed curriculum? How do you adjust it if things get off schedule? Any tips appreciated. I'd love to get better at making and posting schedules too!:lurk5:

Lakota

 

I am new at it -- but i do a draft of the next 2 or 3 weeks, based on what we are doing now then Sunday I fill in the werek to come -- all in penicel and constantly changing.

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I printed out a general weekly schedule that includes what subjects at what times, as well as what days of the week for certain things (art, music, etc.). I have a more specific plan in my own plan book, but I don't really show that to the kids. I think it is nice for some activities to be a surprise. :D

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I make a checklist every day of what's planned. DD likes to know what's coming. Then when we do a task, she can put a sticker on it. She can't read yet, so I use pictures. I just do a google image search for something related to the task and drag an appropriate picture into a word document. We usually have 5-6 pictures on the list, and the first is always reading a picture book.

 

We have a Green Lantern folder - one of the pretty glossy ones that he LOVED at the back-to-school sales & I caved & got it. Sooo glad I did. I make up a sticky note each night with a list of what we're going to do the next day: Phonics, math, history etc etc. When it's done we scratch it out. In the folder I put narration paper, math worksheets, maps... whatever we'll use that fits. Then I leave it by his spot on the table where he'll see it at breakfast. When school is done we can talk about "screen time." The system happened by accident, but it sure works well!!

 

For those of you who plan well ahead, how do you do it? Do you figure it all out during the summer? Is it made easier because you use a scheduled or boxed curriculum? How do you adjust it if things get off schedule? Any tips appreciated. I'd love to get better at making and posting schedules too!:lurk5:

Lakota

 

I have a binder for me that's got some blank lesson plans sheets. I have a picture of it on my blog. It's from a while ago, while we were still working up to a full schedule, but I'm still using the same form. Next time I'll print out fewer so I can tweak the form more often: it doesn't quite fit anymore. I plan between 2-4 months ahead, in pencil. And I keep an eraser handy as I'm doing things, so it can stay flexible. We decided to visit a cave, and they had bats, so I'm moving our book about bats up to, well, it was supposed to be this week but we had company, & then he got sick, so it'll be next week. And I'm forever having to tweak the math cuz he catches on so quickly. But in general it works out. I like having the basic outline ready-made. We do school 6 weeks on 1 week off, and I spend that off week planning. I *hate* to do the planning while I'm also trying to teach. I want it to be very open-and-go when I'm actually teaching.

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I used to. We never kept to it, which would sometimes stress me out. When I analyzed it, I decided that it wasn't worth the stress.

 

The older dc have weekly checklists (sometimes broken into days) that come with some of their curricula ... I copy those, but they're free to rearrange as long as the work is done by Friday. (My 12 year old learned the hard way that maybe it isn't a good idea to go really light on Tuesday, as Wednesday is busy with outside activities, Thursday is moderately so, and doing schoolwork for 8-9 hours on Friday isn't any fun.)

 

My 6 and 10 year olds have a general routine that they follow, but it's mostly self-imposed. I'm available to all of them all morning for any questions, and then on a more limited basis in the afternoons (not usually necessary for the littlers). for the first week of school, they were all starting at the same time, doing an opening with prayer, pledge, etc. Then various people started sleeping in some days, and it didn't happen anymore.

 

Strict scheduling is somewhat against our educational philosophy. Dh works in an office environment where there is some variance to when people come in, sometimes by design, as they deal with clients from both coasts. As long as their work gets done, and they get to the meetings they need to, nobody is telling them that it's 10:00, it's time to do status reports or whatever. There are people who work for him that are so conditioned to being told what to do that he does have to do that, and it kind of annoys him, so he has outright told me that he prefers that I try to get them to manage their own time as soon as possible. (As illustrated earlier, it can take some trial and error, but better at 12 than 22, I suppose.)

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This year I started printing out a weekly schedule for my DD 10 as she drove me crazy last year about it. She is thrilled to have it, and I really should have done it last year for her.

 

I don't put specific times, and she knows that we can be flexible and switch things around if something comes up. She's just happy to be able to see what and how much we're covering every week so that she can know when she's "done."

 

I have 36 weeks basically planned out for most subjects (general idea of what we're doing), but every 6 weeks I plan to work on the next 6 weeks and add in the details/specifics. I have the 1st 6 weeks done (we've completed 3 so far) so now I'm starting to work on the next 6 weeks.

 

This only includes lessons...not outside activities. She can look at my calendar at anytime for those.

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I give my four oldest children a schedule of what I expect them to do for the week. For some subjects I expect a certain amount of time to be spent each day, for others I list the amount of work I expect them to do.

I plan what my younger kids (6, 8, and 9) will do each day, but my older girls (13 and 15) schedule their own days around the work I list for the week.

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I use HomeSchool Tracker plus as well.

 

I do use alot of curriculum that is already planned out. So I type each lesson into HST, and add in the extras that I want to do. Those are Lesson Plans. That's the time-consuming part I did in July. These feasibly are the Lesson Plans for the whole school year, although I can add/adjust as needed.

 

Then in HST, I can take each daily Lesson Plan and put it as an assignment on the weekly schedule. One COULD assign as far out as they want, but I personally only assign one week at a time. Like I just did it yesterday for this coming week. This takes about 10 minutes.

 

This allows me to account for things, like no school on Monday, co-op on Friday, light schoolwork on Tuesday due to outside classes, etc.

 

So for me,this is truly very flexible. If unexpected things come up, I can actually reschedule an assignment for another day.

 

There's no erasing/scratching out/visibly seeing that plans have changed. That would drive me crazy, to have to erase, and re-write lesson plans. With HST, I just click and Wala, the assignment is moved to another day. Oh, a amazing field trip just got scheduled in three weeks, no problem! I hadn't even assigned Lesson Plans to that week yet anyway (they ARE created, just not assigned to a particular day)!! No "visible" sign that I actually had to rearrange. So neat and tidy. Plus if I see that my child is routinely moving faster through the curriculum, I can make it a habit of scheduling two lessons for a day. I can also see how many lessons I have planned for the whole year, in one long, number listed on one page for each subject. So I can see, okay we have 35 lessons left in this Vocab book, and I want to be done by this certain date, I will need to schedule 4 lessons a week, mininum. Can you just tell how much I LOVE HST, the flexibility it gives me, yet I feel fully prepared and planned for our year! Love, love it! Hands down the BEST HSing purchase I have made in the last 7 years!!!!

Edited by Samiam
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I use HomeSchool Tracker plus as well.

 

I do use alot of curriculum that is already planned out. So I type each lesson into HST, and add in the extras that I want to do. Those are Lesson Plans. That's the time-consuming part I did in July. These feasibly are the Lesson Plans for the whole school year, although I can add/adjust as needed.

 

Then in HST, I can take each daily Lesson Plan and put it as an assignment on the weekly schedule. One COULD assign as far out as they want, but I personally only assign one week at a time. Like I just did it yesterday for this coming week. This takes about 10 minutes.

 

This allows me to account for things, like no school on Monday, co-op on Friday, light schoolwork on Tuesday due to outside classes, etc.

 

So for me,this is truly very flexible. If unexpected things come up, I can actually reschedule an assignment for another day.

 

That is almost exactly how I do it as well. This year I am a little behind, so I'm still creating lesson plans. I hope to be done soon!

 

The great thing about the lesson plans is that I can, for the most part, reuse them over again with future students.

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Yes, my DDs each have their own planners. Each weekend I write down their schedules for the week, so they know all of the assignments/expectations for each day, as well as what outside activities they have.

 

They are like me-- they love checking off the boxes as they do their work. :D

 

This is how I do it, as well.

 

Except, I don't like checking off the boxes, myself. It stresses me out more than it helps LOL. But because my job requires overnight travel, I have to have a weekly plan for my checklist-loving substitute teachers :D

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I plan between 2-4 months ahead, in pencil. And I keep an eraser handy as I'm doing things, so it can stay flexible. We decided to visit a cave, and they had bats, so I'm moving our book about bats up to, well, it was supposed to be this week but we had company, & then he got sick, so it'll be next week. And I'm forever having to tweak the math cuz he catches on so quickly. But in general it works out. I like having the basic outline ready-made. We do school 6 weeks on 1 week off, and I spend that off week planning. I *hate* to do the planning while I'm also trying to teach. I want it to be very open-and-go when I'm actually teaching.

 

the eraser and i met each night !! :lol:

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I post a daily schedule the night before but it's not time specific unless the activity requires a time (i.e. gym class at 4:30). The daily schedule shows all of the work for each child that needs to be done before anything else like computer time. My older two write down the individual assignments into assignment books while my youngest does everything with me anyway as a fairly new reader. This way they know if we have friends coming over after school and will need to finish all of their work by a certain time or if they have more leisure to complete assignments. For my oldest she will frequently do a page or two ahead in a subject on Monday or Tuesday so that she can be done a little earlier at the end of the week. HTH

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For those of you who plan well ahead, how do you do it? Do you figure it all out during the summer? Is it made easier because you use a scheduled or boxed curriculum?

 

I have an outline I use to purchase materials with in the spring, then plan in the summer. We don't use a boxed curriculum, but I use the principles in SCM's Planning Your Charlotte Mason curriculum to break things down. I usually make a spreadsheet as a year overview. (Weeks across, resources down, filled in with the chapter/lesson number(s).)

 

How do you adjust it if things get off schedule? Any tips appreciated. I'd love to get better at making and posting schedules too!:lurk5:

Lakota

 

We school 5 weeks on, 1 week off. So when life happens, we can skip an assignment (math & grammar have plenty of review), combine assignments (like CW Aesop), school on Saturday (science, some spelling), or push things back a day and finish during our off week. I'm REALLY trying to avoid the last option, I want those weeks off. So I'm motivated.

 

I am a VERY out of sight out of mind person. But I can't work in a mess. So I use the file crate system - uncovered & in plain sight when I walk in. I've also started using a vertical file holder - the cloth type that hangs on the wall - and it helps a lot. I have Mon-Fri, Weekend, and a folder for each kid. So I can see what I need to do.

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I use workboxes--it's like a 3-D schedule that keeps all of the stuff organized! I do have schedules etc... for me but my kids stopped asking for schedules (which they didn't really follow anyway!) when I introduced these. Here's pics of ours.

 

Merry :-)

I've seen this before. Wondering about the dimensions of the drawers. I have wanted to do workboxes but have trouble finding drawers that will accomodate oversized books. Do yours? Where did you get these?

Lakota

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