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ChristusG

:::sigh:::

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I am so frustrated with teaching DD7 to read. We're still reading (and sounding our way through) basic Dr Seuss books and I See Sam books. DD can see a word in a sentence and say it just fine....and then see the same word just a few words later and have no clue what it is. I really don't get it....it drives me nuts.

 

And she has no comprehension of what she's reading because she has to sound everything out.

 

I hope that some day it will just click. I'm afraid she's going to be reading this way forever. And after this experience, I dread the fact that I have to teach two more children to read after this.

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Do you know if there is anything going on under the surface? Eye issues? Learning issues? My DD7 is the same way but we found out last summer she has an eye issue so I'm trying to patient. She has her annual check up with our ped next week and I'm going to ask if I should have her tested. Some kids just take a little longer than others and some really do have issues. Hang in there!

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I'd ditto getting her eyes evaluated and by a developmental optometrist. It shouldn't be that hard. When your mama gut is saying something is wrong, something is. :)

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She's seeing a vision/auditory therapist. But honestly, we haven't seen any improvement with any of the activities that she's given us and we're about to quit. She's reading slightly better than 6 months ago, but it's still VERY slow going.

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Oh now I remember! I thought I had seen a post by you on this. Whatever that woman is doing *isn't* the VT we're all talking about. To get the VT we're talking about you go to a developmental optometrist and get a full exam. Ours was 2 1/2 hours. They look at how the eyes are converging, focusing, etc. They put them on a computer with infrared glasses to track their eye movements. Etc. etc. You go to http://www.covd.org to find a dev. optom.

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I am so frustrated with teaching DD7 to read. We're still reading (and sounding our way through) basic Dr Seuss books and I See Sam books. DD can see a word in a sentence and say it just fine....and then see the same word just a few words later and have no clue what it is. I really don't get it....it drives me nuts.

 

And she has no comprehension of what she's reading because she has to sound everything out.

 

I hope that some day it will just click. I'm afraid she's going to be reading this way forever. And after this experience, I dread the fact that I have to teach two more children to read after this.

:grouphug:

 

That sounds familiar--and it sounds like it could be poor sight memory for words. You might want to look into Seeing Stars by Lindamood-Bell.

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My now 8yr old dd was the same.. she FINALLY began reading somewhat fluently around the time she turned 8. I didn't think she ever would. She still needs vision therapy, but we haven't done it yet.. But she is reading fairly well now, she just can't read a lot.. so no chapter books yet.

 

Hang in there!

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My 6 year old tends toward the same thing. I've noticed an improvement by doing the following:

-eliminate as many distractions as possible

-let her read the page (or half a page if it's long)

-ask her a few questions to see if she's understanding it

-have her reread the same section

-ask her more questions or repeat if she didn't know earlier

-then I read it.

 

If she is really getting frustrated, I would step back and look for some easy readers. We have the Abeka K readers (just the basic required set) and I find they have been excellent. Let her build up some confidence.

 

All this is of course, in addition to addressing her vision issues. Good luck!

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My ds 7 hFA will be headed to see a COVD this fall (as soon as we've saved enough for our deductible, that is!) I'm not happy about this person, but options are very limited in this area, so I'm getting set to be as well informed and goal-oriented as I can be. May be great--may be unhelpful. That said, my son has 70% b/d reversal, and about 50% number reversal, and some auditory-processing issues (these were noted at his early assessment for autism) that cause him to have real difficulty with distinguishing close vowel sounds. Reading has been tough with a capital T!

What I've been doing that has helped:

 

1) All caps font as much as possible. This takes the confusion over b/d out of the picture for him, so he is less hesitant. Chris had gotten to the point where he didn't even want to try when there was a b or a d in the word. Now he will attempt it with willingness, even when the word is not in all caps.

 

2) Ditched OPGTR for Webster's speller. Taught the first lessons on the whiteboard and made it a routine in the car to go through the syllabary in a sing-song sort of way. We review the first tables often, about every two days we go through every last one of them. I use the all caps version of Websters to teach with. For word review in a larger font I use the copy of Word Mastery that Don Potter has on his website. I correct what I need to correct on some words to make them consistent with Webster's. I also have used color on words with silent e to make the e a lighter color, and I mark where needed long and short. Sometimes I have Chris code the words to show long or short.

 

3) Reading instruction went from once a day to twice a day, and from five days a week to seven. We read for instruction every day for about fifteen minutes per session. This allows me to review, review, review for him.

 

4) I favor word reading over sentence reading at this point, but we do sentences daily in our grammar program. Even if they are above the level he is at, he is now confident enough to take a stab at them, and it gives me the opportunity to go over how to break the words down to read them.

If he wants to guess at it or makes a mistake I will ask him to spell it, and 9 times out of 10 when he spells it, he knows it.

 

5) Lots and lots of encouragement and patience.

 

Reading in the early years is mostly decoding practice, just as writing in the early years is more penmanship practice than actual expression of the child's thoughts. Reading comprehension we practice with narration, or if I must, I will repeat the sentence that has been read before asking a question about it. I try not to make it anymore difficult than it has to be.

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