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What I think I have learned from reading this thread is that, in order to cover college-prep biology and/or chemistry, one must spend two years per subject, using Apologia textbooks, rather than spend only one year per subject, as I did in high school. Sounds quite inefficient, and seems better for some students to use a different program.

 

The post comparing topics coverage by one high school textbook versus another textbook interested me. I am starting dd's 7th grade year this summer, with her study of life science. In order to obtain sufficient coverage, I am having to jumble together both ABeka and CPO textbooks. Really a pain, but I'll do what I have to do.

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What I think I have learned from reading this thread is that, in order to cover college-prep biology and/or chemistry, one must spend two years per subject, using Apologia textbooks, rather than spend only one year per subject, as I did in high school. Sounds quite inefficient, and seems better for some students to use a different program.

 

The post comparing topics coverage by one high school textbook versus another textbook interested me. I am starting dd's 7th grade year this summer, with her study of life science. In order to obtain sufficient coverage, I am having to jumble together both ABeka and CPO textbooks. Really a pain, but I'll do what I have to do.

 

I disagree. I think that the one Apologia textbook is all that's needed for a typical high school college prep course. The two are better if one plans to take the SAT II or prepare for the AP test.

 

It's easy to pick up a "regular" high school text and compare the contents. What isn't readily obvious is how much of that text will be covered in a "regular" high school class. Often, it's much less than half.

 

But there's a variety of texts and programs available to homeschoolers for a reason. Each of us have to decide what's best for our own children. As for us, I'm so glad we've chosen Apologia. YMMV

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Hi. I was trying to draw together into a "bottom line" the disparate posts that I had read throughout the thread. Guess I unwittingly misled you as to my purpose.

 

I disagree. I think that the one Apologia textbook is all that's needed for a typical high school college prep course. The two are better if one plans to take the SAT II or prepare for the AP test.

 

It's easy to pick up a "regular" high school text and compare the contents. What isn't readily obvious is how much of that text will be covered in a "regular" high school class. Often' date=' it's much less than half.

 

But there's a variety of texts and programs available to homeschoolers for a reason. Each of us have to decide what's best for our own children. As for us, I'm so glad we've chosen Apologia. YMMV[/quote']

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Hi. I was trying to draw together into a "bottom line" the disparate posts that I had read throughout the thread. Guess I unwittingly misled you as to my purpose.

 

:001_huh: I don't think I was misled. I was just giving my opinion.

 

To be clear, I'm not disagreeing with what you surmised from this thread, I'm disagreeing with the premise that both texts are needed for a typical high school college prep course. :)

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What I think I have learned from reading this thread is that, in order to cover college-prep biology and/or chemistry, one must spend two years per subject, using Apologia textbooks, rather than spend only one year per subject, as I did in high school. Sounds quite inefficient, and seems better for some students to use a different program.

 

The post comparing topics coverage by one high school textbook versus another textbook interested me. I am starting dd's 7th grade year this summer, with her study of life science. In order to obtain sufficient coverage, I am having to jumble together both ABeka and CPO textbooks. Really a pain, but I'll do what I have to do.

 

At our high school, one year of Apologia texts goes into far more depth and covers more than one year of their classes. In Chemistry the topics covered in the first year change somewhat, but Apologia still covers more.

 

In one year they don't even come close to doing the whole book. I'm not even certain they finish half. They get a full credit though.

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:iagree:, too. But, oh how it makes me sad to have to forgo some excellent courses and learning opportunities for my son just so he can have some things on his transcript that colleges will understand. Makes me pine for the pre-high school days when it was totally up to me what we covered and how much of it. Sigh...

 

Brenda

 

 

I personally think that if more homeschoolers would stand their ground and NOT give in to the 'Test Scores = Worth' monster that has been created in this country, then we all wouldn't have to lament the joy of not having to worry about this pressure!!! My son is doing Apologia Biology, and perhaps it is considered 'dumbed down', but I SERIOUSLY doubt the public schools are doing a better job, even if they have 'better' textbooks. Schools in better districts maybe----but generally---no way! We find the Apologia very challenging and very meaty! And if today's high school Biology texts are covering microbiology so thoroughly---when exactly do these kids actually learn about macro-biology???

 

Apologia is different than regular textbooks, and perhaps each text doesn't cover as much ground as BJU or Campbells or others----but it's NOT dumbed down content whatsoever. ;)

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I personally think that if more homeschoolers would stand their ground and NOT give in to the 'Test Scores = Worth' monster that has been created in this country, then we all wouldn't have to lament the joy of not having to worry about this pressure!!!

 

:iagree:

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I personally think that if more homeschoolers would stand their ground and NOT give in to the 'Test Scores = Worth' monster that has been created in this country, then we all wouldn't have to lament the joy of not having to worry about this pressure!!!

 

But some of us as parents live in a "what if" scenario: What if our students want to attend Ivies or almost Ivies? What if our students want to be in honors programs at competitive schools? What if our "good enough" choice is not "good enough" for a student who continually challenges himself?

 

We know that my son is worth much more than his test scores. His transcript, his application essays and the ancillary materials that I sent to colleges demonstrate an interesting and slightly unusual high school background. But we knew going into the college application process that our EFC would be high. Ideally our son would receive merit aid which he did so that he could attend a vibrant LAC that suits his personality and goals. Perhaps if our pockets were deeper I would have been able to take a higher minded stance.

 

That said, my son's test scores were competitive. But I think it was his essay, his interviews and his personality that sold him to colleges. Perhaps the test scores opened doors?

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But some of us as parents live in a "what if" scenario: What if our students want to attend Ivies or almost Ivies? What if our students want to be in honors programs at competitive schools? What if our "good enough" choice is not "good enough" for a student who continually challenges himself?

 

We know that my son is worth much more than his test scores. His transcript, his application essays and the ancillary materials that I sent to colleges demonstrate an interesting and slightly unusual high school background. But we knew going into the college application process that our EFC would be high. Ideally our son would receive merit aid which he did so that he could attend a vibrant LAC that suits his personality and goals. Perhaps if our pockets were deeper I would have been able to take a higher minded stance.

 

That said, my son's test scores were competitive. But I think it was his essay, his interviews and his personality that sold him to colleges. Perhaps the test scores opened doors?

 

I totally understand! I just think that if the homeschooling community collectively stood up and argued this point to the colleges that now seem to be more entrenched than ever in the attitude that a high score is the ONLY criteria that even gets a kid looked at, this wouldn't be such a burr in our behinds. We are in the same boat here----and it's just SO frustrating! Our dd is certainly not looking at Ivy, but even the local not so great state college has a base Score that determines Worth. All these years of hard work----narrowed down to the almighty Standardized Test Score! They don't even want our transcript because our homeschool is not accredited. I just feel that after ALL these decades, the unique nature of most homeschoolers and the fact that we don't teach to the test and we usually focus on true learning should be better understood and accepted. Just my idealistic brain working overtime from frustration about my daughter's value at a school based entirely on a Test Score :glare:

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But some of us as parents live in a "what if" scenario: What if our students want to attend Ivies or almost Ivies? What if our students want to be in honors programs at competitive schools? What if our "good enough" choice is not "good enough" for a student who continually challenges himself?

 

We know that my son is worth much more than his test scores. His transcript, his application essays and the ancillary materials that I sent to colleges demonstrate an interesting and slightly unusual high school background. But we knew going into the college application process that our EFC would be high. Ideally our son would receive merit aid which he did so that he could attend a vibrant LAC that suits his personality and goals. Perhaps if our pockets were deeper I would have been able to take a higher minded stance.

 

That said, my son's test scores were competitive. But I think it was his essay, his interviews and his personality that sold him to colleges. Perhaps the test scores opened doors?

 

:iagree: Real life is competitive on some things. This is one of them. But our kids are much more than their scores and schools do know this.

 

When hubby wanted to become a PE (Professional Engineer) he also had to take a test and whether he got the designation or not depended on his score.

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They don't even want our transcript because our homeschool is not accredited.

 

That surprises me. Every college to which my son applied encouraged us to submit more than test scores and transcripts so that the admissions staff could learn more about my son and his interesting home education. Granted, he only applied to one State U and they were not so interested in the ancillary stuff although the honors college there wanted it all.

 

Has your daughter talked to out of state LACs? There is a zip code game that happens with admissions.

 

Jane

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I agree about the testing. It really stinks! I so miss the days when we could just curl up with books and take our time...so what if we only got half way through that science book!?! But my son has big dreams for life, and unfortunately he is going to have to play the game to make it happen. Thank goodness my 12dd wants to be a chef and my 10ds wants to be a professional golfer! I hope to never look at SAT2 tests again after my oldest graduates, unless my 4dd needs them-right now all signs point to her being an artist or a pole dancer :D ha ha just joking most 4 year olds dance on tables in their undies, right?

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I agree about the testing. It really stinks! I so miss the days when we could just curl up with books and take our time...so what if we only got half way through that science book!?! But my son has big dreams for life, and unfortunately he is going to have to play the game to make it happen. Thank goodness my 12dd wants to be a chef and my 10ds wants to be a professional golfer! I hope to never look at SAT2 tests again after my oldest graduates, unless my 4dd needs them-right now all signs point to her being an artist or a pole dancer :D ha ha just joking most 4 year olds dance on tables in their undies, right?

 

:lol: Relax---it's completely normal :tongue_smilie:

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I agree about the testing. It really stinks! I so miss the days when we could just curl up with books and take our time...so what if we only got half way through that science book!?! But my son has big dreams for life, and unfortunately he is going to have to play the game to make it happen. Thank goodness my 12dd wants to be a chef and my 10ds wants to be a professional golfer! I hope to never look at SAT2 tests again after my oldest graduates, unless my 4dd needs them-right now all signs point to her being an artist or a pole dancer :D ha ha just joking most 4 year olds dance on tables in their undies, right?

 

 

:lol: Love it! As a toddler, Dd used to strip to her undies when she was mad. Dh always said that would be a handy conflict resolution tactic when she gets married. She stopped eventually but maybe I'll remind her of it at her wedding. Dancing on tables....that could work too.:smilielol5:

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I totally understand! I just think that if the homeschooling community collectively stood up and argued this point to the colleges that now seem to be more entrenched than ever in the attitude that a high score is the ONLY criteria that even gets a kid looked at, this wouldn't be such a burr in our behinds.

 

I agree with Jane on this point. As homeschoolers, we can decide to do whatever we want regarding testing (SAT, ACT, SAT2, AP). We can skip all of it and our students can go the CC/transfer route. We can also have our students study the prescribed curriculum and take all of these tests. The issue often comes down to the money. High test scores often equal greater scholarship opportunities. If we don't want to "play the game", or we have a student that doesn't test well, then that stinks. It just does. But it's life, and life sometimes stinks.

 

I just don't think homeschoolers are a big enough "market" for colleges that we'd have any kind of weight if we all decided to skip this testing. It's pretty clear to me that rankings are very important to colleges, and test scores are a big piece of the rankings game. Unfortunately, we have to 'play by the rules' if we want our dc considered by certain colleges.

 

I do agree that there is more to the student than test scores, and that homeschooling can provide the opportunity for kids to develop their interests and stand out in that way. If we do decide to play along, our students can have the advantages that homeschooling provides.

 

Brenda

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Sorry for repeating but felt my question was getting buried. :D

 

I am only seeing the 2006 TE and 2003 student ed on amazon. Can you use these together?

 

Holly

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