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My3Boys

No Soda Bought With Food Stamps?

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They didn't carry tea or coffee? Koolaid? Juice?

 

Sure. Whether or not it was always stocked at the store is another matter. You could go there one day and have coffee, tea, ect. (one kind of coffee, tea, etc.) and go there in a couple of days and it's all gone. And there were times that the next bush order wouldn't come for a month or more. The days the bush orders arrived were always a big deal. :D

 

Also, keep in mind that the water was really undrinkable. And, those things take water to make, so you're not only buying the coffee or whatever, you're also having to buy bottled water to make it. Seriously, even after two passes through the Brita it was still visibly brown. It was disgusting.

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Guest Dulcimeramy

I totally concede that food options for poor inner city folk are abysmal.

 

When I'm in the city for folk music gigs we often perform in one area that has two grocery options: An organic farmer's market and grocery where lettuce costs $5/head, and a convenience store. That's it. No in-between option for 10 miles.

 

You can get bottled water at either place, though, for roughly the same price.

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Sure. Whether or not it was always stocked at the store is another matter. You could go there one day and have coffee, tea, ect. (one kind of coffee, tea, etc.) and go there in a couple of days and it's all gone. And there were times that the next bush order wouldn't come for a month or more. The days the bush orders arrived were always a big deal. :D

 

Ah, got it...I understand now.

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I have no problem limiting soda. In fact, I would be fine with classifying it as a non-food and/or applying tax to it in states without tax on food. And I'm a soda drinker.

 

I'm just saying that eliminating *all* junk would make it hard for people in some areas. Did you read the links I offered? Are you interested in really talking about it? Because I have more information on this, but I'm not going to dig it up if you aren't honestly interested.

 

Why quote me then? Where did I say anything about limiting *all* junk food? I simply said there surely must be healthier alternatives than soda for families on food stamps. I don't care what they eat. Speaking honestly, I would find all of it crap because I'm a raw vegan. However, I certainly don't expect my standard to be everyone's standard. But trying to say that soda is a true necessity & the only viable option for some on FS is just something I find unbelievable, so I said so.

 

Susan

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I'd also extend the non-food classification to cheese puffs, potato chips, cookies, candy, and ice cream. And anything else that's junk.

 

But who gets to define "junk?" Slippery slope, IMO.

 

Cookies are bad, but can someone use their food stamps to buy butter, flour and cocoa powder? Is soda a no-no, but Gatorade gets to stay on the list? Seltzer water? Potato chips are a no-go, but what about a bag of corn chips and salsa?

 

See how it gets difficult? I'm not personally comfortable with being that much of a big-brother to anyone, food stamps or not.

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Because generally, if you budget extra, they remove that amount from your food stamp amount so you don't have the extra anymore. We changed some things so we could have $60 of cash a month, where previously essentially every penny went to bills. Food stamps responded by dropping our food stamp amount by that $60, so we now have to use the cash to cover the basic foods instead. No extra. The only extras that are allowed are one-time amounts, like getting a bit of birthday present money or a tax return, and if some remains after a month it must be reported & drops your food stamp amount accordingly. Extra cash isn't really allowed in the system, at least in our state. I know every state is different.

I was thinking more along the lines of putting $5 aside.

 

We've been in the situation that we were lucky to still have $2 to our names by the time payday came, so it would literally go in a piggy bank until we had enough for a special treat.

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Why quote me then? Where did I say anything about limiting *all* junk food?

 

I was addressing something different in your post-that the typical rural grocery stores and inner city convenience stores are totally different animals.

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I totally concede that food options for poor inner city folk are abysmal.

 

When I'm in the city for folk music gigs we often perform in one area that has two grocery options: An organic farmer's market and grocery where lettuce costs $5/head, and a convenience store. That's it. No in-between option for 10 miles.

 

You can get bottled water at either place, though, for roughly the same price.

 

Yep, because in the city, you have to walk, take a bus, or own a vehicle to get to the bigger, cheaper groceries as they are typically on the edges of the city. The in city stores are EXPENSIVE! You can pay triple the prices on many things. I went into a Walgreens the other day. What was on sale (the most for your money) was 2/99c Arizona Teas. Naked Juices are $4. However, the price is understandable if you know how things are made and what certain ingredients cost.

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I have no problem limiting what people can buy with food stamps. I'm pretty liberal, but no one is forced to use food stamps, so if you choose to use them (which is totally cool with me and I am fine with my tax dollars being used to support the food stamp program) you agree to the limitations.

 

:iagree: Word for word. I'm extremely liberal but I don't see any reason for food stamps to cover something that . . . isn't food.

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One problem with severely limiting food stamps is that many people who receive food stamps do *not* live in communities with easy access to what most of us think of as a normal grocery store. When you are applying something to the entire community you must think beyond your own challenges and experiences.

 

There are some interesting initiatives out there to try to help close this gap. But, those are not prevalent or regular enough yet.

Great article!

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Perhaps they are trying to discourage items that aren't healthy? If that is the case, they would have to limit alot more stuff. This can be a hot topic.

 

Agreed

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I was addressing something different in your post-that the typical rural grocery stores and inner city convenience stores are totally different animals.

 

Sure. I get that. I just cannot believe there is nothing to drink but soda, regardless of the area. I've been in some tight spots and I have strict dietary needs, yet I manage to find things to eat and drink AND stay within my budget. That's my only point. I cannot be convinced that soda is a *must*, and that's all I was saying.

 

Susan

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But who gets to define "junk?" Slippery slope, IMO.

 

Cookies are bad, but can someone use their food stamps to buy butter, flour and cocoa powder? Is soda a no-no, but Gatorade gets to stay on the list? Seltzer water? Potato chips are a no-go, but what about a bag of corn chips and salsa?

 

See how it gets difficult? I'm not personally comfortable with being that much of a big-brother to anyone, food stamps or not.

:iagree: I don't think all ice cream is junk food. I think that popsicles should be allowed too. I think there's a time and place for very cold dairy or very cold flavored water.

 

I'm pretty sure that soda is a generally agreed upon luxery, but... on further thinking ginger ale can be one of those things that people need to keep in their home. I have enough experience with sick people, long term illness, to know that soda can be more than an extra.

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:iagree: Word for word. I'm extremely liberal but I don't see any reason for food stamps to cover something that . . . isn't food.

 

I have to confess, I have used food stamps to buy horehound and lemon candy (they make excellent cough drops when one does not have money in the bank for actual coughdrops and you are sick and waiting for the next paycheck). Just an example of how people will take advantage of the extra they may have on their food stamps to meet other needs. Ditto for popsicles, which we see as a must when the flu or a stomach illness is being dealt with.

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So should food stamps be limited to musts? WIC is very limited to what can be purchased. Are you saying SNAP (Food Stamps) should have a very limited list as well? What would that look like, exactly?

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On what basis does anyone deserve ice cream or chocolate, particularly ice cream or chocolate purchased with my dime?

 

Are you working? Or are you speaking of the universal "My Dime"?

Otherwise how is it your dime?

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I don't believe anyone chooses to use food stamps. That sounds just stupid there. I did not choose for my son to be disabled, I did not choose there father and I split etc.

 

What about the people who are working full time paying taxes and still need help with their groceries, do they not deserve a soda now and then or an ice cream?

 

So your broke you have to swallow your pride to ask for help and Heaven forbid if you drink a soda or eat a twinkie? If the government is going to tell me how to eat then I think he should tell everyone how to homeschool

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Are you working? Or are you speaking of the universal "My Dime"?

Otherwise how is it your dime?

 

Thank you! Many people on food stamps work and pay taxes as well. Many had good jobs and spent years NOT on food stamps, but find themselves on them now. In a sense, they are getting back some of what they put in. They helped others and others are now helping them. One of these days, they could be helping to support the previous poster.

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Thank you! Many people on food stamps work and pay taxes as well. Many had good jobs and spent years NOT on food stamps, but find themselves on them now. In a sense, they are getting back some of what they put in. They helped others and others are now helping them. One of these days, they could be helping to support the previous poster.

 

That's my only point. It's hard to judge everyone with the same brush. Abuse cases get the majority of air time, but most aren't. So, whatever.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/13618342

 

NY is apparently looking to disallow the use of food stamps to purchase soda. What do you think?

 

I don't care either way. Food stamps are intended to supplement a family's grocery budget, not pay for all of their food. That being the case, I suppose it would not be a great hardship for most food stamp recipients to purchase soda using cash.

 

The children of people who receive food stamps qualify automatically for free lunches at the public schools in both states I have lived in recently. The lunch programs are very different -- in MA, the food was nutritious and tasted good and cost twice as much as the swill they serve here.

 

The USDA has nifty food plans based on various budget levels. The lowest cost food plan has soda in it because it is cheaper than milk. This plan was developed specifically with food stamp recipients in mind. If one were to buy groceries based on the low cost food plan, one's family would not have anywhere near a healthy diet. It is impossible, unless the food stamp recipient baked their own bread, cooked everything from scratch, had a garden, and canned fruits and vegetables. The vast majority of people are not going to do that, and many cannot.

 

Many public schools make money by allowing soda machines which children have access to.

 

The government, IMO, should be consistent. There is no rationale for feeding swill to children from poorer school districts, while children in upper middle class districts eat well and nutritiously. There is no rationale for disallowing soda purchases with food stamps, while the feds encourage its purchase in their low cost food plan, and many schools allow children to purchase soda on the premises.

 

Then there is the issue of corn subsidies -- high fructose corn syrup, for instance, replaces sugar in many foods and is not healthier. Why isn't the government subsidizing healthy food crops?

 

Those are the types of issues that make me see red. This soda/food stamp issue is just not important in the grand scheme of things.

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So your broke you have to swallow your pride to ask for help and Heaven forbid if you drink a soda or eat a twinkie?

 

:iagree: It's called kicking people when they're down. Hey, let's make them feel even worse than they already feel. :glare:

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Are you working? Or are you speaking of the universal "My Dime"?

Otherwise how is it your dime?

 

Thank you! Many people on food stamps work and pay taxes as well. Many had good jobs and spent years NOT on food stamps, but find themselves on them now. In a sense, they are getting back some of what they put in. They helped others and others are now helping them. One of these days, they could be helping to support the previous poster.

 

:iagree:

 

My husband was an active-duty Sailor when we received WIC. We still payed taxes AND served our country. And yes, we bought soda with our extra money. Sometimes we even went to a movie (gasp!) I guess we should have just stayed home and wallowed in our poorness.

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I think the term 'deserves' is the issue.

 

Ppl deserve clean drinking water. Children deserve safe places to live, food on the table. 'Deserve' to me equals need, not want.

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So should food stamps be limited to musts? WIC is very limited to what can be purchased. Are you saying SNAP (Food Stamps) should have a very limited list as well? What would that look like, exactly?
Yes, and deciding what the musts are without making it a case-by-case basis means that more people get burned.

 

I thought one of the reasons we limited government was because the assumption is that people can decide for themselves?

 

Thank you! Many people on food stamps work and pay taxes as well. Many had good jobs and spent years NOT on food stamps, but find themselves on them now. In a sense, they are getting back some of what they put in. They helped others and others are now helping them. One of these days, they could be helping to support the previous poster.

I agree emphatically. My dad is disabled and....... he drinks Diet Coke, oh and Crystal Lite. ooooOOoooo He's diabetic, he is literally addicted to sugar. Getting some fake sugar, as unhealthy as it is, keeps him from going through the cabinets and downing real sugar (the kind that can kill him). He worked himself into the ground and a part of his paycheck went into the support that he uses today.

I don't believe anyone chooses to use food stamps. That sounds just stupid there. I did not choose for my son to be disabled, I did not choose there father and I split etc.

 

What about the people who are working full time paying taxes and still need help with their groceries, do they not deserve a soda now and then or an ice cream?

 

So your broke you have to swallow your pride to ask for help and Heaven forbid if you drink a soda or eat a twinkie? If the government is going to tell me how to eat then I think he should tell everyone how to homeschool

:iagree:

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There is something comforting in our predictability. :grouphug:

 

:lol:

 

Here ya go:

post-6721-13535084955935_thumb.jpg

post-6721-13535084955935_thumb.jpg

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As someone who is on food stamps :o I have no problem with no soda. Soda absolutely isn't good for you. Especially if your outside in the heat playing (like in the article). You do not need soda.

 

For the record I don't buy soda (OK, OK I have bought the occasional root beer but it is a very rare occurrence.). There shouldn't be an uproar about soda.

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If they don't allow soda, then I hope every other unhealthy item is also on the list of don't allows.....anything with sugar, preservatives, HFCS, etc...

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I thought one of the reasons we limited government was because the assumption is that people can decide for themselves?

 

 

 

 

Right, but we're talking about a government program. There are always guidelines and stipulations when one receives any kind of assistance.

 

I don't really care one way or another what people fill their bellies with, but I do see it as the right of the agency to make rules regarding distribution or use of funds. If someone doesn't want to adhere to them, they can choose not to participate. That's really where choice comes in, as someone else said.

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If they don't allow soda, then I hope every other unhealthy item is also on the list of don't allows.....anything with sugar, preservatives, HFCS, etc...

 

We'd starve...thanks.

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It is bad for you. I agree.

 

There are better choices for you when you live in a place where the grocery store you shop at is what you think of when you think of a grocery store: An entire aisle of seemingly unlimited beverage choices. When the only grocery store in town is the size of a small 7-11, and the shelves are never full, and the only beverage choices are milk at $10 a gallon or a 12-pack of soda at $4 a piece, and the water is undrinkable, what other choices do you have? I realize this isn't the case in most of the country. I was just saying that I have lived in places where this was the reality, so I understand how someone ends up feeling like soda is the best, most economical, choice.

 

Isn't water availabe in jugs? We can get different kinds for less than $1/gallon if bought off the shelf. We have water you can buy that's even cheaper if you bring in your own jugs and fill them. Maybe that's not available everywhere?

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I'm extremely liberal but I don't see any reason for food stamps to cover something that . . . isn't food.

 

 

...but if it isn't "food", then we need to redefine it for everyone. There is no need to make a special restriction for food stamp users... it is either, legally, food or not.

 

If it is *legally* food, then food stamp users should be as free to "waste" their limited resources on it as anyone else... unless we decide to revamp the food stamp program to be an education/nutrition program the way WIC is/is supposed to be.

 

I'm absolutely fine with the definition of "food" not including candy, soda, potato chips, etc... but it should apply to *everyone*, not just to those receiving aid. (ie when I purchase those items here in WA state, I would then need to pay sales tax on them as 'non-food' items.)

 

I imagine there are other legal consequences that would follow from such a change - perhaps in B&O taxes?

 

...but I don't see another reasonable way to impose such limitations without re-doing the whole system. (Perhaps that would be a good thing, but it would be expensive and time consuming, and I don't think this is the best time to focus on that... we have more pressing concerns, imnsho.)

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To me, it's sad that those that need assistance (help) feel the need to confess or apologize for their use of assistance (needing help).

 

Our family has not been on assistance, but we've been lucky. As is anyone who has not found themselves in need of financial help from the government. It only takes one thing to knock a family's budget on its @ss. And at that point, does it really matter if they are drinking some sugar water?

 

Walk a mile. :rant:

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I think the term 'deserves' is the issue.

 

Ppl deserve clean drinking water. Children deserve safe places to live, food on the table. 'Deserve' to me equals need, not want.

 

:iagree: I think food stamps should be a reasonable (not intending to debate what reasonable is) amount for the family and their COLA. After that the family should be able to buy what they want. If they can budget in treats, good for them. I wouldn't complain about the new law, though, if I was on food stamps. If I wanted the pop that badly, I'd pay cash.

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One problem with severely limiting food stamps is that many people who receive food stamps do *not* live in communities with easy access to what most of us think of as a normal grocery store. When you are applying something to the entire community you must think beyond your own challenges and experiences.

 

There are some interesting initiatives out there to try to help close this gap. But, those are not prevalent or regular enough yet.

 

This is such an important point!

 

My eldest has been studying sustainable agriculture and this is one of the issues they've covered in several of her courses.

 

Here in Seattle there are some neighborhoods with very limited access to nutritional food choices - and little knowledge of what to *do* with, frex, whole grains or fresh produce.

 

There are some wonderful programs here (Lettuce Link is amazing!), but the needs are so great, and the availabel resources so few. ...I wish WIC could be expanded in this direction....

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The money is coming from the government for food. Therefore the government can say what qualifies as food. Soda is not food. And you can't pull the 'there aren't a lot of other choices in those neighborhoods.' I've started making my own iced tea to save money. I'm sure you can buy tea bags and sugar at 7-11.

 

To the poster whose husband was in the military and receiving food stamps, I think it's despicable. Not that you received them, but that your dh's salary was so low that you actually qualified. Anyone who is putting their life on the line in the military should be receiving a high enough salary that they can afford food for their family, including soda and ice cream if they want it. I'm so sorry that you had to go through that. I know it's not uncommon. :grouphug:

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Sounds good. Hope the state bans other HFCS liquids as well. I'd rather see those stamps spent on real food. Up here, a 12 pack of name brand soda is $5. For the same $5, the fam could have a pound of sirloin and wash it down with some good clean spring water straight out of the Catskills.

 

You can get a 24 pack of bottles water at walmart (and those are everywhere) for the same price as a 12 pack of soda. Double the amount and better for you. :D

 

No nutritional value at all. I'd say no to being able to use food stamps to purchase. It doesn't mean people can't have it, just that you can't use food stamps to purchase.

 

:iagree:

 

One problem with severely limiting food stamps is that many people who receive food stamps do *not* live in communities with easy access to what most of us think of as a normal grocery store. When you are applying something to the entire community you must think beyond your own challenges and experiences.

 

There are some interesting initiatives out there to try to help close this gap. But, those are not prevalent or regular enough yet.

 

:iagree:

 

Instead of restricting what they can buy why not do something like double every food stamp dollar for veggies (frozen or fresh, not everyone has the time for the fresh route) fruits and the like. You could also go the opposite way as say if you purchase "junk" food then you only get half (or some such thing) the amount per dollar to purchase it.

 

The problem when they start restricting too many things is you then take the responsibility out of the people and give it to the government. People need more education than just one class. It isn't just about buying this or that, it is a lifestyle. A lot of these people don't see it as nutritional/non-nutritional they see it as empty belly/full belly while stretching the food stamps they get.

 

You can also restrict too many foods. What would be considered "junk" food? Nuts are high in fat and cholesterol (yes the good kind but still) would that be considered a junk food? Almonds are very good for you. Lets take the opposite track, iceburg lettuce and corn. Neither one have much nutritional value but since they are a fresh (or frozen for corn) veggie then they have to be good right? What about beef? You know that a lot of people on food stamps buy ground beef and not the lean kind. Not all that great for you, are we going to ban beef as well? Pork? What about jelly for PB&J? Jelly is high is sugar are we going to be limited to sugar free jelly? Syrup? You see what I mean?

 

I do have to say upon reflection, I don't want to give an inch, once you give up that little inch it opens up for the mile to be taken.

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:iagree:

 

I'd also extend the non-food classification to cheese puffs, potato chips, cookies, candy, and ice cream. And anything else that's junk.

 

:iagree:

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To the poster whose husband was in the military and receiving food stamps, I think it's despicable. Not that you received them, but that your dh's salary was so low that you actually qualified. Anyone who is putting their life on the line in the military should be receiving a high enough salary that they can afford food for their family, including soda and ice cream if they want it. I'm so sorry that you had to go through that. I know it's not uncommon. :grouphug:

 

:iagree: This situation infuriates me.

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I don't think pop, candy, chips, cookies etc. should be able to be purchased with food stamps. I feel that they should be limited to dairy, meat, veggies, fruit and in my opinion whole grain breads.

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On face value I don't see a problem with it. However, I have lived in places where soda is significantly less expensive than milk, and the water was so bad that I wouldn't drink it after two passes through a Brita. So, I understand why people in some parts of the country feel like soda is their best/only option.

 

A gallon of water is still cheaper than pop in our grocery stores. And all of the inner city convenience stores I have been in have bottled water, and it is about the same price as soda.

 

There is tax on soda here. Maybe it is in a different category? I agree that it is not food, and therefore food stamps shouldn't be used to buy it.

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The money is coming from the government for food. Therefore the government can say what qualifies as food. Soda is not food. And you can't pull the 'there aren't a lot of other choices in those neighborhoods.' I've started making my own iced tea to save money. I'm sure you can buy tea bags and sugar at 7-11.

 

 

 

I think you missed the posts from the person referring to Alaska. The stores tend to run out of those things and it can be awhile before the next plane in. So you buy what is available. Living in the city, no, my corner store does not sell tea bags (I'm a big tea drinker...skip the soda, give me tea and coffee!).

 

BTW, I have to ask...what is the difference between tea and soda? Both are flavoured water with sugar. Both have very little to no nutritional value (unless you are purchasing the pricier herbal teas...but the average everyday tea is black tea). One IS cheaper than the other (you can get 100 teabags for the price of a 2L). One is hard on the gallbladder and the other sucks the iron out of you.

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I don't think pop, candy, chips, cookies etc. should be able to be purchased with food stamps. I feel that they should be limited to dairy, meat, veggies, fruit and in my opinion whole grain breads.

 

How is this supposed to work?

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