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FIAR - too much to add to our plate?


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Hello all!

 

I posted a thread recently asking about favorite Kindergarten curriculum and got an overwhelming response for Five in a Row.

 

I have heard many people sing praises for FIAR, but it is very difficult to get a good idea from their web site of how it actually plays out in an every day situation. From the bits that I've seen on other peoples' blogs, it seems to me that it is basically reading a book five days in a row and doing projects that coordinate with the theme of the book (unit studies?).

 

My concern with this is that as a first time homeschooling parent next year, I will be overwhelmed with adding this to our plate. So far, we plan on doing 100EZ, Singapore Math, Bible Lessons, Explode the Code, Artistic Pursuits, and possibly some geography. If things go well beyond that, we may do some Spanish.

 

Would it be crazy to add FIAR to all that? Does it take a long time to prepare for the projects? Does it cost a lot of money?

 

Also, I'll be homeschooling an active Kindergartener with two year old twins by our side...

 

Thanks so much for all your help and for sharing your thoughts!

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FIAR is unit studies based around a book each week. I would say adding to your plate would be overwhelming. I am using the book lists as a reading list for my littles without the guides.

 

IF you did use FIAR, you could DROP your Bible study (supplemental book for vols. 1-3), geography, and art. All these are wrapped into the program. There is also a cookbook which I highly recommend.

 

It does not have to cost a lot of money if you can get the books from your library. Lay in for some art supplies, and really you are good to go.

 

I HIGHLY suggest you join the FIAR Forum board and talk to the ladies there as they are going to have way more experience with the program. Plus, they are very nice.

 

On a side note, (I know you did not ask.) all of my kids I tried ETC with found it unbelievably frustrating trying to figure out the pictures and too writing heavy for the age. I did not see any improvement with their reading using it. MCP Plaid Phonics (look at Rainbow Resource for it) is a better choice, IMO.

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I just posted today about returning to FIAR with my younger ones *because* I had too much on my plate. You don't *have* to do projects. You can read the book and talk through each lesson. You could drop the geography as most of the FIAR books will cover this.

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The nice thing about this program is that it can take as much or as little time as you want it to. Just read the book every day. On the days you aren't doing geography, art, or one of your other fun extras, pick an activity from the FIAR book. Some of the "activities" are just a five minute discussion about the way a character behaved, or about the technique the illustrator used. Other activities are quick and easy, like making a list of ways you can be a good friend, etc. None of the activities take more than 30 minutes, and it's not something you have to do every day, you can just pick the activities you like best and leave the rest.

 

What I loved about this program is that it taught me how to talk with my kids about good literature even at a young age, and taught me to slow down and notice things in a well-written children's book other than just the plot. :001_smile:

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To be honest, the beauty of FIAR for me is that you could drop your load to Singapore and 100EZ/ETC and FIAR and call it good. This post has a good example of how FIAR works a lot of the time here. You can do it completely conversationally. Typically it lasts us MAYBE 45 minutes. It's also nice because my son (3.5) and youngest daughter (21 mos) can also sit in on the reading of the book and maybe a craft or something we do. If you'd like to see a review of a book we've done within a week, you can check out our blog to see what's worked for my girl.

 

If you're going to add it ON TOP of what you're already planning though, your schedule might feel too busy or like you're doing too much.

 

I'm very, VERY pleased that we are doing FIAR. Last week and this week we have taken off to do some unit-based study and I can't WAIT to get back to FIAR next week!

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:iagree: We did ordinary parents guide to teaching reading, horizons math and FIAR our kindergarten and first grade year... we added in ETC occasionally. It worked well.

To be honest, the beauty of FIAR for me is that you could drop your load to Singapore and 100EZ/ETC and FIAR and call it good. This post has a good example of how FIAR works a lot of the time here. You can do it completely conversationally. Typically it lasts us MAYBE 45 minutes. It's also nice because my son (3.5) and youngest daughter (21 mos) can also sit in on the reading of the book and maybe a craft or something we do. If you'd like to see a review of a book we've done within a week, you can check out our blog to see what's worked for my girl.

 

If you're going to add it ON TOP of what you're already planning though, your schedule might feel too busy or like you're doing too much.

 

I'm very, VERY pleased that we are doing FIAR. Last week and this week we have taken off to do some unit-based study and I can't WAIT to get back to FIAR next week!

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For me, I start with FIAR and see what else I need. FIAR includes social studies, language arts, art, math and science.

 

With the social studies, you can focus on geography, which is what we did. It was a great foundation for history the next year.

 

FIAR art is awesome! I wouldn't feel the need to add to it unless I had a very prolific young artist on my hands.

 

As far as math goes, FIAR math is not sufficient all by itself for math. We had a separate math program with my eldest when we did FIAR, but I decided I will not do math for K with the next one. All that a K'er really needs for math is to learn how to count and learn their shapes. If the child wants to do math then that is different, but I don't think that you actually need math for K.

 

We added vocabulary study and copywork taken from FIAR books for handwriting.

 

After all that, you really only need a phonics/reading program and perhaps Bible (though FIAR does have a Bible supplement).

 

When I was starting my first year, I had a lot of veteran moms advise me to start with one or two programs and add them as we were able. But did I listen? No. I knew that I could do it all. By January, I had completely abandoned two of the programs that we were using ($150 worth of curriculum that I might have saved myself). So now I am hopping on that bandwagon and telling you to start with FIAR and phonics/reading, and then add the other things if you still feel you need them.

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On a side note, (I know you did not ask.) all of my kids I tried ETC with found it unbelievably frustrating trying to figure out the pictures and too writing heavy for the age. I did not see any improvement with their reading using it. MCP Plaid Phonics (look at Rainbow Resource for it) is a better choice, IMO.

 

Thanks! I appreciate that!

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For me, I start with FIAR and see what else I need. FIAR includes social studies, language arts, art, math and science.

 

With the social studies, you can focus on geography, which is what we did. It was a great foundation for history the next year.

 

FIAR art is awesome! I wouldn't feel the need to add to it unless I had a very prolific young artist on my hands.

 

As far as math goes, FIAR math is not sufficient all by itself for math. We had a separate math program with my eldest when we did FIAR, but I decided I will not do math for K with the next one. All that a K'er really needs for math is to learn how to count and learn their shapes. If the child wants to do math then that is different, but I don't think that you actually need math for K.

 

We added vocabulary study and copywork taken from FIAR books for handwriting.

 

After all that, you really only need a phonics/reading program and perhaps Bible (though FIAR does have a Bible supplement).

 

When I was starting my first year, I had a lot of veteran moms advise me to start with one or two programs and add them as we were able. But did I listen? No. I knew that I could do it all. By January, I had completely abandoned two of the programs that we were using ($150 worth of curriculum that I might have saved myself). So now I am hopping on that bandwagon and telling you to start with FIAR and phonics/reading, and then add the other things if you still feel you need them.

 

:iagree:

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I'll echo the others in saying it would be overwhelming to add FIAR to that. We did FIAR for part of Ariel's K year (MBTP for the other part, because we thrive on variety.) I really liked the art lessons in FIAR and found them to be enough for us at the time. Also, the geography lessons are good, and you can expand on them if you want, or focus either on world geography or US, depending on your book selections. FIAR basically covers one subject a day, so you would do LA on Monday, art on Tuesday, science on Wednesday, social studies on Thursday and applied math on Friday. It took about 30 minutes including reading the story most days, though art and science days always took the longest because that's what Ariel enjoyed. We added math (RS A), a phonics program, Spanish (La Clase Divertida) and piano (Kinderbach) because I wanted a well rounded program and Ariel really wanted to learn Spanish to play with the neighborhood children.

 

It only costs a lot if you buy all the books new and insist on expensive art supplies. I think I spent maybe $150, which included new guides, and about half of it was art supplies because all we had were Crayola crayons and markers.

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Second the advice to use FIAR and drop the other art and geography. Our kindergarten day has been FIAR, reading, math.

 

FIAR is a great program when you have tagalong toddlers, because it doesn't rely on being able to sit quietly at the table and keep papers neat. For a language arts lesson, my 6yo might be acting out vocabulary words from the story; for science we might be seeing what floats and what sinks in a tub of water or going to a pond to observe ducks. Those are activities the 2yo can also enjoy on his level. Also, now that he's two he's starting to enjoy hearing some of the FIAR stories.

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I am feeling your pain. I have a 5,3,1 and I don't know what to do next year. I already purchased Abeka for my 3 yr old, and don't have the discipline to get Everything in. My kindy/1st grader is currently doing OPG, ETC, Mystery of History, Artistic Pursuits, Piano, PE with a co-op and Considering God's creation for Science.

We were going to do apologia for science next year, and add First language lessons and possibly abeka cursive. But it's supposed to be "fun years" right? So, should I drop it all and just do FIAR? Seems more Charlotte mason than just plain "Classical" But maybe less stress?

-Yvonne

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I am feeling your pain. I have a 5,3,1 and I don't know what to do next year. I already purchased Abeka for my 3 yr old, and don't have the discipline to get Everything in. My kindy/1st grader is currently doing OPG, ETC, Mystery of History, Artistic Pursuits, Piano, PE with a co-op and Considering God's creation for Science.

We were going to do apologia for science next year, and add First language lessons and possibly abeka cursive. But it's supposed to be "fun years" right? So, should I drop it all and just do FIAR? Seems more Charlotte mason than just plain "Classical" But maybe less stress?

-Yvonne

 

There seems to be the impression that because FIAR is a cuddle-on-the-couch sort of program, that it is not rigorous or classical. That could not be farther from the truth.

 

Through FIAR, my dd5 learned world geography such that she impresses any adult that comes to our house (our wall map is large and is a natural conversation piece). She already loved history, but that love was sustained in FIAR. She loved looking through her ever-growing vocabulary list. I began to see art techniques that we learned in FIAR being used in her drawings that she did just for fun. I am convinced that if I had used a more traditional approach with texts and worksheets, she would not have learned as much despite the seemingly more rigorous nature of those programs. FIAR was designed to help a child want to learn, and it is chock full of stuff to teach that child. FIAR was a solid foundation for a classical curriculum.

 

Moreover, there wasn't really a traditional "classical" curriculum for K, other than learning to read--and even that was often put off until a bit later. K is very young to begin schooling your children, even in the classical model. So IMO, anything you do beyond learning to read for K is rigorous.

 

Do not feel guilty about putting aside what you have planned in favor of a more "fun" curriculum. Most of us moms went to b&m schools that squeezed the love for learning right out of us, making us think learning and fun were diametrically opposed to each other. But learning is fun. Your job is to teach that to your young children (and hopefully to yourself along the way) so that you are not fighting with them about school when they are older.

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Thanks for this post. I was considering the same thing! -- And I am in the exact same boat with you with twin almost 2 year olds - LOL. I think I will hold off on FIAR and stick with HOD for now. ;) I'm figuring I can add in FIAR for during the summer or if I feel like I need a break from HOD?

 

Too many great options! :)

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On a side note, (I know you did not ask.) all of my kids I tried ETC with found it unbelievably frustrating trying to figure out the pictures and too writing heavy for the age. I did not see any improvement with their reading using it.

 

:iagree: This was frustration nation for us. Later on it might have worked, but I was not taking any chances.

 

I think FIAR with 100 EZ and Singapore are more than enough at this age. Just my 2 cents.

 

~Laurie

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There seems to be the impression that because FIAR is a cuddle-on-the-couch sort of program, that it is not rigorous or classical. That could not be farther from the truth.

 

Through FIAR, my dd5 learned world geography such that she impresses any adult that comes to our house (our wall map is large and is a natural conversation piece). She already loved history, but that love was sustained in FIAR. She loved looking through her ever-growing vocabulary list. I began to see art techniques that we learned in FIAR being used in her drawings that she did just for fun. I am convinced that if I had used a more traditional approach with texts and worksheets, she would not have learned as much despite the seemingly more rigorous nature of those programs. FIAR was designed to help a child want to learn, and it is chock full of stuff to teach that child. FIAR was a solid foundation for a classical curriculum.

 

Moreover, there wasn't really a traditional "classical" curriculum for K, other than learning to read--and even that was often put off until a bit later. K is very young to begin schooling your children, even in the classical model. So IMO, anything you do beyond learning to read for K is rigorous.

 

Do not feel guilty about putting aside what you have planned in favor of a more "fun" curriculum. Most of us moms went to b&m schools that squeezed the love for learning right out of us, making us think learning and fun were diametrically opposed to each other. But learning is fun. Your job is to teach that to your young children (and hopefully to yourself along the way) so that you are not fighting with them about school when they are older.

:iagree:

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I used it for my 1st 2. I plan to use it again for a year between HOD-LHTH and LHFHG for my next 2.

 

I meant to add that when we used it, we did math, phonics, handwriting and FIAR. That was it! Great year for us!

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I think it would be a bit much to add FIAR to everything you already have planned but as others have said FIAR includes art, geography, science, ect.. We are just finishing us our first year with FIAR and we had a great time. I have a 5 yr old also but only one 2 yr old. I have been very surprised how much the little one has been able to join in and can't wait to do "the book of the week" as we call it here. We don't do a new book every week. This gives us time to explore things that we wanted to know more about or catch up if we missed something. FIAR can be done very simply or you can add many things to it. I have found through the year that simpler has been better. As far as cost that depends if you can find the books at your local library or not. We bought some and the rest we have found at the library. I found some for next year for sale at the library for 50 cents. All that I have added to FIAR is OPGTTR, MEP math, and Explode the Code (Get ready, Get Set, and Go for the code). Hope that helps.

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There seems to be the impression that because FIAR is a cuddle-on-the-couch sort of program, that it is not rigorous or classical. That could not be farther from the truth.

 

Through FIAR, my dd5 learned world geography such that she impresses any adult that comes to our house (our wall map is large and is a natural conversation piece). She already loved history, but that love was sustained in FIAR. She loved looking through her ever-growing vocabulary list. I began to see art techniques that we learned in FIAR being used in her drawings that she did just for fun. I am convinced that if I had used a more traditional approach with texts and worksheets, she would not have learned as much despite the seemingly more rigorous nature of those programs. FIAR was designed to help a child want to learn, and it is chock full of stuff to teach that child. FIAR was a solid foundation for a classical curriculum.

 

Moreover, there wasn't really a traditional "classical" curriculum for K, other than learning to read--and even that was often put off until a bit later. K is very young to begin schooling your children, even in the classical model. So IMO, anything you do beyond learning to read for K is rigorous.

 

Do not feel guilty about putting aside what you have planned in favor of a more "fun" curriculum. Most of us moms went to b&m schools that squeezed the love for learning right out of us, making us think learning and fun were diametrically opposed to each other. But learning is fun. Your job is to teach that to your young children (and hopefully to yourself along the way) so that you are not fighting with them about school when they are older.

 

So does FIAR stick with a 4 year cycle to make sure that we cover grammer/rhetoric/dialectic? I am all about chronological history because I get confused when things are from too many points in history. But I know that kids can pick up whenever because they have no sense of time at that age. That's the only problem that I am being presented. Is there a way to "row" information so that it does four year cycles so that stuff is relearned in depth?

Acronym B&m?

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So does FIAR stick with a 4 year cycle to make sure that we cover grammer/rhetoric/dialectic? I am all about chronological history because I get confused when things are from too many points in history. But I know that kids can pick up whenever because they have no sense of time at that age. That's the only problem that I am being presented. Is there a way to "row" information so that it does four year cycles so that stuff is relearned in depth?

Acronym B&m?

 

FIAR is only meant to cover one year (though Vol. 4 was created for those that wanted more). It is not classical as far as history is concerned. That doesn't bother me, because it is for a younger age than history is traditionally taught to. Some people do use FIAR for longer than just the K year, and some use it for older children. In those cases, I wouldn't consider it classical.

 

Now there is Beyond FIAR, for older children, and I have no experience with it. But I do not believe that it follows a classical history sequence. I haven't seen a lot of people using this, and I think that is because the concept doesn't work as well for older children and/or because people want to move on to traditional classical studies.

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There seems to be the impression that because FIAR is a cuddle-on-the-couch sort of program, that it is not rigorous or classical. That could not be farther from the truth.

 

Through FIAR, my dd5 learned world geography such that she impresses any adult that comes to our house (our wall map is large and is a natural conversation piece). She already loved history, but that love was sustained in FIAR. She loved looking through her ever-growing vocabulary list. I began to see art techniques that we learned in FIAR being used in her drawings that she did just for fun. I am convinced that if I had used a more traditional approach with texts and worksheets, she would not have learned as much despite the seemingly more rigorous nature of those programs. FIAR was designed to help a child want to learn, and it is chock full of stuff to teach that child. FIAR was a solid foundation for a classical curriculum.

 

Moreover, there wasn't really a traditional "classical" curriculum for K, other than learning to read--and even that was often put off until a bit later. K is very young to begin schooling your children, even in the classical model. So IMO, anything you do beyond learning to read for K is rigorous.

 

Do not feel guilty about putting aside what you have planned in favor of a more "fun" curriculum. Most of us moms went to b&m schools that squeezed the love for learning right out of us, making us think learning and fun were diametrically opposed to each other. But learning is fun. Your job is to teach that to your young children (and hopefully to yourself along the way) so that you are not fighting with them about school when they are older.

 

What great insight. Thank you so much for sharing all that.

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I used it for my 1st 2. I plan to use it again for a year between HOD-LHTH and LHFHG for my next 2.

 

I meant to add that when we used it, we did math, phonics, handwriting and FIAR. That was it! Great year for us!

 

Sorry, but I can't figure this out...what is HOD, LHTH, LHFHG?

 

I didn't see them on the abbreviations list.

 

Thanks!

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Sorry, but I can't figure this out...what is HOD, LHTH, LHFHG?

 

I didn't see them on the abbreviations list.

 

Thanks!

 

HOD is Heart of Dakota publishing. 2 of their levels are Little Hands to Heaven and Little Hearts for His Glory.:001_smile:

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Jumping back in. FIAR is Charlotte Masonish, not classical. From my experience with my olders and now youngers most of classical is A .TOTAL .WASTE. OF. TIME. with youngers (under 5th graders). Really. It sucked the joy of learning out of my older ones and I am still paying for it.

 

IMO, FIAR or something like Oak Meadow that is more gentle but still structured is a much better choice for little ones. Move into the more 'classical' stuff later when they are in 5th. Now that is not to say you don't teach the basics of LA and math but the heavy emphasis on history, Latin, grammar, spelling rules, and facts, facts, facts and drill, drill, drill at a young age are not the way to have a happy home, in my experience.

 

I know we all worry if it is enough. I am telling you it is enough to cover phonics, handwriting and math along with something like the above. Our kids will not be 'behind'. They will be happy and so will you.

 

Learning does not have to be drudgery. What is that teaching the child? Explore and enjoy. This time goes so fast.

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Jumping back in. FIAR is Charlotte Masonish, not classical. From my experience with my olders and now youngers most of classical is A .TOTAL .WASTE. OF. TIME. with youngers (under 5th graders). Really. It sucked the joy of learning out of my older ones and I am still paying for it.

 

IMO, FIAR or something like Oak Meadow that is more gentle but still structured is a much better choice for little ones. Move into the more 'classical' stuff later when they are in 5th. Now that is not to say you don't teach the basics of LA and math but the heavy emphasis on history, Latin, grammar, spelling rules, and facts, facts, facts and drill, drill, drill at a young age are not the way to have a happy home, in my experience.

 

I know we all worry if it is enough. I am telling you it is enough to cover phonics, handwriting and math along with something like the above. Our kids will not be 'behind'. They will be happy and so will you.

 

Learning does not have to be drudgery. What is that teaching the child? Explore and enjoy. This time goes so fast.

 

:iagree: We are new to classical and the idea of my 9yr old doing it any younger is laughable:lol:

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Jumping back in. FIAR is Charlotte Masonish, not classical. From my experience with my olders and now youngers most of classical is A .TOTAL .WASTE. OF. TIME. with youngers (under 5th graders). Really. It sucked the joy of learning out of my older ones and I am still paying for it.

 

IMO, FIAR or something like Oak Meadow that is more gentle but still structured is a much better choice for little ones. Move into the more 'classical' stuff later when they are in 5th. Now that is not to say you don't teach the basics of LA and math but the heavy emphasis on history, Latin, grammar, spelling rules, and facts, facts, facts and drill, drill, drill at a young age are not the way to have a happy home, in my experience.

 

I know we all worry if it is enough. I am telling you it is enough to cover phonics, handwriting and math along with something like the above. Our kids will not be 'behind'. They will be happy and so will you.

 

Learning does not have to be drudgery. What is that teaching the child? Explore and enjoy. This time goes so fast.

:iagree::iagree::iagree::D

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For me, I start with FIAR and see what else I need. FIAR includes social studies, language arts, art, math and science.

 

With the social studies, you can focus on geography, which is what we did. It was a great foundation for history the next year.

 

FIAR art is awesome! I wouldn't feel the need to add to it unless I had a very prolific young artist on my hands.

 

As far as math goes, FIAR math is not sufficient all by itself for math. We had a separate math program with my eldest when we did FIAR, but I decided I will not do math for K with the next one. All that a K'er really needs for math is to learn how to count and learn their shapes. If the child wants to do math then that is different, but I don't think that you actually need math for K.

 

We added vocabulary study and copywork taken from FIAR books for handwriting.

 

After all that, you really only need a phonics/reading program and perhaps Bible (though FIAR does have a Bible supplement).

 

When I was starting my first year, I had a lot of veteran moms advise me to start with one or two programs and add them as we were able. But did I listen? No. I knew that I could do it all. By January, I had completely abandoned two of the programs that we were using ($150 worth of curriculum that I might have saved myself). So now I am hopping on that bandwagon and telling you to start with FIAR and phonics/reading, and then add the other things if you still feel you need them.

 

:iagree: With everything in this post.

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I agree with everyone saying that you don't need all of that, and FIAR is plenty with reading/phonics, math (if you need one), and handwriting.

 

I just wanted comment on BYFIAR:

 

The approach is totally different from FIAR. It is literature AND research based. The child works more independently. There is a lot of info IN the manual, but when a child gains interest s/he is to research the topic. One thing that I hear frustrates many is that they move through the chapter books too slowly. The child reads a chapter then works on projects based on that chapter. It can take 2 days or so to do this. Some fix this by letting the child read at will. And no the history is not chronological.

Edited by Susie in MS
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Jumping back in. FIAR is Charlotte Masonish, not classical. From my experience with my olders and now youngers most of classical is A .TOTAL .WASTE. OF. TIME. with youngers (under 5th graders). Really. It sucked the joy of learning out of my older ones and I am still paying for it.

 

IMO, FIAR or something like Oak Meadow that is more gentle but still structured is a much better choice for little ones. Move into the more 'classical' stuff later when they are in 5th. Now that is not to say you don't teach the basics of LA and math but the heavy emphasis on history, Latin, grammar, spelling rules, and facts, facts, facts and drill, drill, drill at a young age are not the way to have a happy home, in my experience.

 

I know we all worry if it is enough. I am telling you it is enough to cover phonics, handwriting and math along with something like the above. Our kids will not be 'behind'. They will be happy and so will you.

 

Learning does not have to be drudgery. What is that teaching the child? Explore and enjoy. This time goes so fast.

 

Please, please, please tell me that you meant what you wrote! (what I highlighted above) I have spent the past few weeks beating myself up for not wanting to stop FIAR. I have also spent HOURS trying to figure out what to do next year with my 4th and 1st grader and where to fit them into the "rotation", etc...and feeling like a substandard homeschooler (especially after I read so many posts like "FIAR is great for K, but not really after that")

 

So if you really meant 5th, I will be so happy.:hurray:

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Please, please, please tell me that you meant what you wrote! (what I highlighted above) I have spent the past few weeks beating myself up for not wanting to stop FIAR. I have also spent HOURS trying to figure out what to do next year with my 4th and 1st grader and where to fit them into the "rotation", etc...and feeling like a substandard homeschooler (especially after I read so many posts like "FIAR is great for K, but not really after that")

 

So if you really meant 5th, I will be so happy.:hurray:

 

Hi,

In the past when I would read how FIAR is for K(same as what you wrote above)I would also let it get to me. Not anymore. Some people just won't/don't get it and I am now fine with that. My kids learn alot with FIAR and it is the only thing that really gets done completely. I love it. We also have a wall map and it attracts the curiosity of everyone who visits our home. I also thought that I absolutely had to teach history chronologicaly..."twtm" way or we would be behind.:tongue_smilie:Then I thought about it.... Honestly...I didn't learn history until upper elementary and it didn't hurt my feelings. :D I can function in society just fine. :001_smile:I want my kids to enjoy our homeschool. History will be deeply studied in highschool with KONOS HOW for us so I just want to make learning as enjoyable and as productive as possible. I hated school and would have loved to learn the FIAR way so that is what we do.

 

HTH,

 

Penny

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Hi,

In the past when I would read how FIAR is for K(same as what you wrote above)I would also let it get to me. Not anymore. Some people just won't/don't get it and I am now fine with that. My kids learn alot with FIAR and it is the only thing that really gets done completely. I love it. We also have a wall map and it attracts the curiosity of everyone who visits our home. I also thought that I absolutely had to teach history chronologicaly..."twtm" way or we would be behind.:tongue_smilie:Then I thought about it.... Honestly...I didn't learn history until upper elementary and it didn't hurt my feelings. :D I can function in society just fine. :001_smile:I want my kids to enjoy our homeschool. History will be deeply studied in highschool with KONOS HOW for us so I just want to make learning as enjoyable and as productive as possible. I hated school and would have loved to learn the FIAR way so that is what we do.

 

HTH,

 

Penny

 

I soo agree with this! My dd is only going into 1st but I have graduated 3 others. Just looking at my dd now I can tell you that history just goes right over her head unless it is a story. Other than FIAR we occasionally read from a history reader, but that just doesn't sink in like the FIAR lessons do. I don't think people saying *Oh FIAR is good for K* bothers me. I just wonder how in the world they can't see what all is in there. The only thing that will pull me away from FIAR (for short periods) is doing some other fun units that I had planned before I discovered FIAR. Erika, do what floats your hsing boat. :D

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Where is the "crying my eyes out while smiling" smilie?

 

I think that reading what classical education "should" look like, coupled with my own feelings of just bobbing here and there really put me in a crazy frame of mind. I often refer to is as my homeschool schizophrenia; the desire to be structured and orderly vs. learning what delights my children.:willy_nilly: Does anyone else suffer from this? :001_smile:

 

I may actually get some sleep tonight. Thank you ladies. :grouphug:

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Where is the "crying my eyes out while smiling" smilie?

 

I think that reading what classical education "should" look like, coupled with my own feelings of just bobbing here and there really put me in a crazy frame of mind. I often refer to is as my homeschool schizophrenia; the desire to be structured and orderly vs. learning what delights my children.:willy_nilly: Does anyone else suffer from this? :001_smile:

 

I may actually get some sleep tonight. Thank you ladies. :grouphug:

 

 

:lol:

 

I get that homeschool schizophrenia too sometimes! And next time I do I want you to snap me out of it! :D

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I'm a former FIAR user and just want to add that FIAR, while meant to be done in 5 days, can be done in 4. You could use your 5th day for "extras". Such as using Artistic Pursuits & Spanish if you desired. :)

 

We did FIAR for many years and did it many different ways from 5 days straight to 4 days straight. I even know of a few families who did it in 3 days and used the other days for different activities.

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