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Anyone have "cold feet" about homeschooling?


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I plan to begin homeschooling next year. I feel strongly most days that I want to homeschool, feel that is the direction God is leading me in, and DH and I think that will be best for our family. But every now and then I get extremely anxious about it and want to say forget it! But then it passes and I get excited again. Anyone else out there who went through this before beginning "official" homeschool? Any advice to calm nerves?

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:grouphug: Yes, the idea of being mom AND teacher to my kids freaked me the heck out! But then I walked one step at a time and realized that if lots of other moms could do this, so could I. (I had the same thought when I was freaked out about giving birth.;))

 

This is a wonderful community for support, practical advice, curriculum suggestions, etc. So ask away...and use the search feature to find topics related to your questions, as well.

 

I don't know how old your kids are, but I always tell myself, "I think I can do fifth grade." ;)

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Yes. We pulled the kids out of public school last year to homeschool. I was very excited but a nervous wreck at the same time. I relied too heavily on workbooks this year because I was so afraid that >I< couldn't possibly teach them. FF to now, we are finishing up year one and really looking forward to the fall. I have so much more confidence now.

 

The nerves will continue to be there. Just take a deep breath, relax, and enjoy your kids. :D

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Yes! I went back and forth for a long time. Now we're definitely doing it, but I'm a little nervous about starting first grade. It seems like such a drastic decision to make about someone else's life. I worry dd will be missing out on school activities and friendships. But then I remember that school will always be there if homeschool just doesn't work out, and that makes me feel better.

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Totally normal!!! I think most people go through it, even if they are confident in their decision.

 

My friend and I pulled our kids out of school a couple months apart. She was first. She knew it was the best thing for her kid, but it was SCARY. She and I both talked about how we felt good about what we were doing but were also scared to death at the same time. She cried on the way home from that last day and warned me about it. Sure enough, I did fine on the last day of school (Christmas party day), but when it came time to actually leave, I cried too... in front of the teacher. :lol: She reassured me, as she knew this was a good choice for my son too (though she wished he would stay). I was absolutely confident that this was the right choice for him, but it didn't stop me from being anxious and thinking "What if I screw this kid up?!?!?" :D

 

If your kids are young, I agree, you really can't mess them up too much at a young age. I was pulling a first grader out, and seriously, if we didn't do anything at all, I could have stuck him back in 2nd grade at school and he'd do fine. I went in knowing that, so it helped ease the fears.

 

It gets better once you get started and have some time under your belt. You'll get more confidence. I was warned on another forum that many homeschoolers have a "crisis of faith" like this, sometimes even every year. It's completely normal. If it's really freaking you out, you might want to write down the reasons why you have decided to homeschool, and then read those reasons any time you start to get cold feet. :)

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I've hsed mine from the beginning (you may be pulling yours out), but I know the "What do I think I'm doing?!?!?" that comes at the odd moments. Especially when you add in moving, a new baby, or dh's extra-busy schedule for a semester, etc. But for me the following have helped:

 

Because I'm starting at the beginning, I have no idea how I'm going to do Middle School or High School. But that's okay because by the time dd7 gets there, I will. I don't have to know it all or how they will all turn out. Just take the next step.

 

If it helps, look at standards for your local school district, the State of California, or in the Core Knowledge Series for your student. I find some of the terminology overwhelming, but still - I can see where my dc are ahead, where they're a little behind because of differing scope and sequence in curricula (like Math-U-See), and feel better able to defend things to myself. The Well-Trained Mind is good for figuring if you're doing enough writing, etc., if you happen to be following a more classical approach.

 

Realize that your cold feet won't completely go away by the time you begin schooling. I second what the pp said about writing down your reasons for hsing. Then you have something to refer to when you need to re-convince yourself.

 

For me, planning works wonders. I love that part and know from experience that if it isn't written down somewhere it's not likely to happen. I plan more than I expect to accomplish so I can leave some out without feeling like I'm failing.

 

Remember it's a learning process for you, too. You'll be a much better teacher in three years, probably, than you are now. But that's great - professional development, right?

 

In the end, never underestimate the therapeutic effect of chocolate, ice cream, or whatever works for you. :D

 

HTH!

Mama Anna

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I plan to begin homeschooling next year. I feel strongly most days that I want to homeschool, feel that is the direction God is leading me in, and DH and I think that will be best for our family. But every now and then I get extremely anxious about it and want to say forget it! But then it passes and I get excited again. Anyone else out there who went through this before beginning "official" homeschool? Any advice to calm nerves?

 

What are you anxious about? Failing? The amount of work?

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I pulled my Ds out at Valentines day this year (Kindy) and there are moments, like now, 6 months pregnant, moving out of our first home into my moms temporarily while we WAIT for our new house to be ready....that I think to myself, WHAT AM I DOING??!?!?!?!? He is starting to miss his friends and I freak out thinking I am ruining him by taking that away from him. I wont lie, Ive even thought about just putting him in school for first grade. BUT then I sit down and think about WHY I am doing this. Why it was so important for us to pull him out. And I know, know, know...that this is Gods plan for us, and that I CAN handle it with His help, and He will provide and lead the way. I could throw him back to Public school, but that would be taking the "easy" route and giving up on both of us...AND God. In my opinion. Totally not saying that everyone that does go back to school is turning on God, but that in my case right now, I know this is His plan for us. Even if it isn't "easy" right now.

 

Coming to this board and visiting other homeschool blogs helps me to stay excited about it. Those cold feet are normal (i hope ;))

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Um, yeah when I was homeschooling from the sofa with severe morning sickness with #2, when #2 had colic for 6 months and somehow I got pregnant with #3:confused:, when my Mom died suddenly 6 years ago having her gall bladder out, when I got pregnant with #4, when #3 was diagnosed with autism....and on and on.

 

Ignore the feeling, it will pass. :) No seriously, it is normal and when there is lots of stress for me it is worse. I don't even seriously consider stopping. Dh lost his job, got a new job, went back to school, I was in school at the same time- we just keep on going. It has all worked out. Some seasons have been easier and some harder.

 

I kept thinking as the children aged it would be easier, but so far for us that has not been true. This year was way stressful, but mostly I just put that on myself. The oldest entered high school and I was in shock and totally freaking if my bases were covered. :001_huh:

 

You will start homeschooling and love it (most days) and all will be well. Look forward! :grouphug:

 

~Laurie

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Yes, all the time. And this is our third year.:001_smile: I don't mean to be a smart alek, but it's one of those things that I wonder about a lot. Am I doing it right? Is it best for my kids? Is it best for me? (it's been very hard on me) Don't worry! Your feelings are normal. It's a big step!

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I felt the exact same way. I had to pull my oldest out of public school midyear, and it was a very hard decision to make even though I knew it was right, and it was the only choice I had because of the bad situation was son was in, and I felt God wanted me to do it, and I knew it was best, etc. etc. etc. I used to feel the most afraid at night, sort of like a panic was hitting me. Maybe it was fear of the unknown or worry that I was going to mess up my kid.

 

All that went away soon after we started homeschooling. I found out that it was all very doable and that my child learned so much more than he was learning in the public school. My husband and I are now so glad we made that decision and can see all of the benefits, though at first it does take a huge leap of faith.

 

Another way to look at it is that you can take homeschooling one year at a time. If it doesn't work out well for you, you can always reenroll the kids back into public school. You don't have to feel like you are making this decision for the rest of your life. There is some security in knowing there are other alternatives available if homeschooling doesn't work well for your family.

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I remember wondering if it would work... so what I did was "practice" homeschooling on Saturdays and during the summer, with short, definite goals. That way I had a good feeling that it would work.

 

Oh, that's a good point... I afterschooled DS before pulling him out, and it definitely increased my confidence. I was only doing math and occasional science, but it was enough to get my feet wet.

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I feel so much better knowing I am not the only one. I don't know many homeschoolers so thanks!

 

This year we will begin K with our oldest. I have 2 more little ones and plan on having more. I worry about being able to manage school, housework, childcare, pregnancy, etc. I worry that it will be too easy to take the day off when I don't feel like it and we will get behind. I know K is much easier year. I don't worry about the academics. Just the management of it all.

 

I am just glad to know others have questioned their decision even when they knew it was right thing to do.

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I felt like we were doing something illegal for months after I pulled my kids from school. :lol: I think I might have actually kept them indoors when we first started because I was afraid people would say something. Kinda funny now that I think back on it.

 

I dare someone to test my kids. Bring it on! They know more than I do! :tongue_smilie:

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We had decided to hs when my oldest was 3. I kept vascillating back and forth for the next two years and her K year was absolute torture for me as I kept wondering if I was going to mess her up for life. That was 7 years ago and I still have doubts but they only last for a minute now. :001_smile:

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Guest momk2000

Yes! This is my 5th year homeschooling, and I still get cold feet from time to time. I just have to remind myself to breathe - lol. :)

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I am back/forth every other day it seems. I'm really excited and nervous! I'm feeling better now that I have a plan...curriculum.........the plan may not work once it's implemented but oh well...Im sure we will figure it out as we go.

 

I took the pressure off me for the first year and am using a plan that's already planned out for me but still flexible. PLUS I have decided to HS my kindergartner too instead of sending her to Public School like I had originally planned.

 

Can't really screw up kindergarten!

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Am I doing it right? Is it best for my kids? Is it best for me? (it's been very hard on me) Don't worry! Your feelings are normal. It's a big step!

 

Success with parenting, home educating and relationships in general have a lot to do with intentionality, imho.

Start with the end in mind. What kind of people do you want to be interacting with in 20 years? This will guide your parenting. Look at Tiger Mom. She is an incredibly intentional parent. She wants her kids to perform. Her parenting is performance driven. I don't agree with all of what she does but she is a great case study in intentional parenting.

 

What are you hoping to accomplish by home schooling? How is this different than what you would hope to accomplish by outsourcing your kids education? Define the difference for yourself so you KNOW why you are doing what you are doing. It will get hard and you will question as you go. If you write the vision and make it plain, it will ease the doubt.

 

Develop your pedagogy. Why do you do what you do and how?

Anything done with intentionality and diligence will be hard on you. Successful homeschooling, like success at a job or any skill requires diligence and sacrifice. You give up certain things in order to do other things.

 

Educate yourself. "Are you doing it right" can be answered by first defining what "It" is. Once you've defined "It" learn all that you can about "it."

I'm an educator. I am constantly learning, reading, growing about education. I believe that edcuation is the transmission of culture. I am clear and intentional about the culture that I want to convey to my kids (you can read more about it here). The goverment school system can't do that for me. It can work for others, and that's great. But it is a distraction to where I am heading.

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Success with parenting, home educating and relationships in general have a lot to do with intentionality, imho.

Start with the end in mind. What kind of people do you want to be interacting with in 20 years? This will guide your parenting. Look at Tiger Mom. She is an incredibly intentional parent. She wants her kids to perform. Her parenting is performance driven. I don't agree with all of what she does but she is a great case study in intentional parenting.

 

What are you hoping to accomplish by home schooling? How is this different than what you would hope to accomplish by outsourcing your kids education? Define the difference for yourself so you KNOW why you are doing what you are doing. It will get hard and you will question as you go. If you write the vision and make it plain, it will ease the doubt.

 

Develop your pedagogy. Why do you do what you do and how?

Anything done with intentionality and diligence will be hard on you. Successful homeschooling, like success at a job or any skill requires diligence and sacrifice. You give up certain things in order to do other things.

 

Educate yourself. "Are you doing it right" can be answered by first defining what "It" is. Once you've defined "It" learn all that you can about "it."

I'm an educator. I am constantly learning, reading, growing about education. I believe that edcuation is the transmission of culture. I am clear and intentional about the culture that I want to convey to my kids (you can read more about it here). The goverment school system can't do that for me. It can work for others, and that's great. But it is a distraction to where I am heading.

 

Enjoyed reading your links. Thanks for your input. I am not a "go against the grain" kind of person but God really shook up our life in the past few years and pushed me out of my comfort zone. I do have a vision for our family but I am afraid of that vision at times because it is so counter-culture. Being counter-culture is hard for a recovering people pleaser!

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Being counter culture is hard.

I just read a book called, Grooming the Next Generation for Success by Dani Johnson. She is a multi millionaire and life coach. One of her main points is the 98% rule. 98% of people reach the end of their life failing to have accomplished what they wanted to. 2% are well prepared and have success. She says, if you want success, figure out what everyone is doing and do the opposite ;).

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I am finishing my 4th year homeschooling. In the middle of this year, 2 of my best homeschool friends suddenly quit and put their kids back in public/private school. It really shook my resolve! I started doubting my own decisions and came really close to changing my mind. I decided not to make any hasty decisions and wait it out. I'm so glad I did. I'm back to knowing that, for us, homeschooling is the very best decision and I love that it is what we are doing.

Hang in there and hang with us! You'll love it! ;)

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I felt the same way. :grouphug:

 

I would encourage you to read some books about un-schooling and homeschooling philosophy. I know this may sound totally absurd, but hear me out.... :confused:

 

When I started homeschooling, I was totally fanatical about doing a great job educating my daughter... and I was totally discouraged when I wasn't perfect... and I was NEVER perfect... I really wondered whether or not I shouldn't just send her to school.

 

But, after reading books like The Teenage Liberation Handbook (even though I don't remember agreeing with everything in this book) and books by Charlotte Mason and books by John Taylor Gatto, I realized that what I was doing (even though it wasn't perfect according to what I had imagined it would be) was MUCH better than the life my daughter would be living being a kid learning in school (in my opinion. I know and respect other moms who disagree.)

 

Even going on a walk in the woods and looking at plants is often more effective and enjoyable and inspirational, etc. than being in a classroom, talking about the same plants, teaching your kids about photosynthesis, etc.

 

I guess what I am saying is that I try and focus on the positive aspects of homeschooling life in general... like the quality time I am spending with my kids, rather than focusing on the fact that I am responsible for teaching them EVERYTHING!!! and getting the laundry done, and cooking dinner, and sending cards to family members, etc.

 

The teaching is the easy part, really... keeping the reasons why you chose homeschooling always before you can be the hard part. :D

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:DYES - I am right where you are now. My oldest is in public Pre-K right now but she graduates in June and then we will be officially HS. I've always wanted to HS my kids since before I even had any but now that the time is here I'm freaking out. It isn't so much the academics I'm worried about (I've looked at the K curriculum online and my DD is already past what they expect by the end of the year and she is only an average child- not gifted) but my DD is incredibly social and I feel like I am somehow depriving her of a normal opportunity to make her own friends without me always hovering in the background. It doesn't help that she is also resistant to the idea of not going to school like her friends - she loves Pre-K and thinks school will be just like it.

 

To further encourage me to HS the schools in this area are so bad I wouldn't send my dog there to be taught anything :lol: - I've looked into them and there is just no way I can make myself enrol her. Also my DD has SPD - although she manages to hold it together and behaves well at Pre-K for the 3 hours she is there - every single day after I pick her up she has a huge meltdown in the parking lot and I have to send her to her room where she throws the most violent tantrum for 20 minutes - and then comes out all sweet and normal for the rest of the afternoon :001_huh: The sensory overload of 3 hours in a noisy classroom is too much for her - I don't even want to know what I will have to deal with if I put her in full day K - I fear she wouldn't last till she got home and I'd be at the school all the time.

 

Even so I'm terrified I'm doing something that will screw them up for life - I'm lucky that my DH is in full support - he is a public school teacher and he tells me when I am doubting my decision "She will not go into public school -if you won't teach her I will when I get home " :D

 

I have to tell myself everyday that my DD is already ahead of the K'ers - so what does she have to loose - school here is not compulsory till they are 6 so even if I mess it up and decide to put her in public for Grade 1 - she won't have missed much and she will have had an extra year of school freedom.

 

And yet - I am still freaking out :lol:

Edited by sewingmama
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I am back/forth every other day it seems. I'm really excited and nervous! I'm feeling better now that I have a plan...curriculum.........the plan may not work once it's implemented but oh well...Im sure we will figure it out as we go.

 

I took the pressure off me for the first year and am using a plan that's already planned out for me but still flexible. PLUS I have decided to HS my kindergartner too instead of sending her to Public School like I had originally planned.

 

Can't really screw up kindergarten!

 

You know what? It's SO much easier once you've got a plan. You can always change things as you go along and find things that work/don't work for you--you will figure it out as you go. But having a clear plan makes it so much easier to just get started. And remember--it's one day at a time. Teaching your child to read or doing an entire math book are intimidating to think about. But practicing short vowel sounds or doing one page of addition? Not so bad, right?

 

You'll do great! :grouphug:

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Yes!! Especially because DS 6 wants to go to regular school so bad...he is so social and would LOVE to be surrounded by 30 other kids all day. Of course, I don't think he realizes he would have to sit at a desk and be quiet all day. We get home from a play date and he asks immediately to go play with the neighborhood kids. And on the days he's super difficult and fights constantly with his brother...I want to throw in the towel on parenting, let alone homeschooling. (This fall we're going to be doing CC, so I'm really hoping that helps with the social aspect).

 

At least I don't worry about schooling DS 5...he thrives being at home with me, and could not function in a regular school setting. Actually, he still can't function consistently even for an hour in Sunday School. :confused:

 

I worry because everyone else seems to be so organized with clutter-free homes and well-behaved children. I feel like a failure because our home isn't fun enough, or clean enough, or scheduled enough, or whatever. We've always planned on homeschooling, but it's soo much harder than I thought. Of course, parenting is about 500 million times harder than I thought it would be when I was 14.:tongue_smilie:

 

Anyway, yeah, I think cold feet is pretty normal. At least for a recovering perfectionist like me. :)

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Even going on a walk in the woods and looking at plants is often more effective and enjoyable and inspirational, etc. than being in a classroom, talking about the same plants, teaching your kids about photosynthesis, etc.

:D

:iagree:

As a past school teacher and wife to a current school administrator... We choose to homeschool our kids because it is almost impossible to not have it be more effective. Don't get me wrong, ps teachers are doing incredible things. I am just maximizing my ability too teach something better.

-

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I have been HSing for 5 whole years now. My oldest is finishing 3rd/4th grade. I was fine in the early years but last night - I got cold feet.

 

I get cold feet when I look over the fence at the neighbor's yard and start to compare then I feel like I am failing my kids.

 

Lesson? Don't look over the fence and you'll be fine! :D

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Doesn't every one go through this? It's like parenting, child birth, and every stage of this wonderful life. PANIC!

But like most of life, it's just one day at a time.

Relax, Breathe, talk to other parents, and don't feel that you have to re-create Rome in a day. You get the best part of parenting, time with your children, time to really talk and converse with them, to see and hear what they are thinking.

Chills!

 

One word of advice. Don't buy a whole bunch of curricula and become overwhelmed. Take two or three subjects in the beginning. Ask others what they like, buy it used if possible. I'd recommend NOT creating your own curricula, because it takes so much more time and energy than you imagine. So don't over commit yourself being all things at all times. Give yourself some breathing room and relax.

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:DYES - I am right where you are now. My oldest is in public Pre-K right now but she graduates in June and then we will be officially HS. I've always wanted to HS my kids since before I even had any but now that the time is here I'm freaking out. It isn't so much the academics I'm worried about (I've looked at the K curriculum online and my DD is already past what they expect by the end of the year and she is only an average child- not gifted) but my DD is incredibly social and I feel like I am somehow depriving her of a normal opportunity to make her own friends without me always hovering in the background. It doesn't help that she is also resistant to the idea of not going to school like her friends - she loves Pre-K and thinks school will be just like it.

 

To further encourage me to HS the schools in this area are so bad I wouldn't send my dog there to be taught anything :lol: - I've looked into them and there is just no way I can make myself enrol her. Also my DD has SPD - although she manages to hold it together and behaves well at Pre-K for the 3 hours she is there - every single day after I pick her up she has a huge meltdown in the parking lot and I have to send her to her room where she throws the most violent tantrum for 20 minutes - and then comes out all sweet and normal for the rest of the afternoon :001_huh: The sensory overload of 3 hours in a noisy classroom is too much for her - I don't even want to know what I will have to deal with if I put her in full day K - I fear she wouldn't last till she got home and I'd be at the school all the time.

 

Even so I'm terrified I'm doing something that will screw them up for life - I'm lucky that my DH is in full support - he is a public school teacher and he tells me when I am doubting my decision "She will not go into public school -if you won't teach her I will when I get home " :D

 

I have to tell myself everyday that my DD is already ahead of the K'ers - so what does she have to loose - school here is not compulsory till they are 6 so even if I mess it up and decide to put her in public for Grade 1 - she won't have missed much and she will have had an extra year of school freedom.

 

And yet - I am still freaking out :lol:

 

 

this is exactly us (swap SPD for Mild Autism) meltdowns after preschool and all. Deep breath, we are starting Kindergarten this summer/fall.

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Just had an hour conversation with a friend over this. Totally understand. (We are starting K next year too.)

She was very helpful in making sure my expectations for myself, my children and my home management were not too high- and they were and I know they probably still are. Hopefully I can get that settled properly in mind before we start in August. :)

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Success with parenting, home educating and relationships in general have a lot to do with intentionality, imho.

Start with the end in mind. What kind of people do you want to be interacting with in 20 years? This will guide your parenting. Look at Tiger Mom. She is an incredibly intentional parent. She wants her kids to perform. Her parenting is performance driven. I don't agree with all of what she does but she is a great case study in intentional parenting.

 

What are you hoping to accomplish by home schooling? How is this different than what you would hope to accomplish by outsourcing your kids education? Define the difference for yourself so you KNOW why you are doing what you are doing. It will get hard and you will question as you go. If you write the vision and make it plain, it will ease the doubt.

 

Develop your pedagogy. Why do you do what you do and how?

Anything done with intentionality and diligence will be hard on you. Successful homeschooling, like success at a job or any skill requires diligence and sacrifice. You give up certain things in order to do other things.

 

Educate yourself. "Are you doing it right" can be answered by first defining what "It" is. Once you've defined "It" learn all that you can about "it."

I'm an educator. I am constantly learning, reading, growing about education. I believe that edcuation is the transmission of culture. I am clear and intentional about the culture that I want to convey to my kids (you can read more about it here). The goverment school system can't do that for me. It can work for others, and that's great. But it is a distraction to where I am heading.

 

Thank you, this is EXACTLY what I have been thinking as we've researched homeschooling....but I never could have put it that succinctly. I'm looking forward to our official start this summer, and mostly I'm terrified, but I think it is going to work out. :001_smile:

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You know what? It's SO much easier once you've got a plan. You can always change things as you go along and find things that work/don't work for you--you will figure it out as you go. But having a clear plan makes it so much easier to just get started. And remember--it's one day at a time. Teaching your child to read or doing an entire math book are intimidating to think about. But practicing short vowel sounds or doing one page of addition? Not so bad, right?

 

You'll do great! :grouphug:

 

Thank you! You are so right! I was freaking myself out. When I had my "light bulb" moment it was all very clear and everything fell into place.

 

 

Im sure I will have many more "light bulb" moments...thankfully.

 

:)

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Yes, I freaked out when my ds was 5 (he's now 11). We're now going into our sixth year, and my younger one is starting first grade in August.

 

I knew that I wanted to homeschool, but until I read the The Well Trained Mind, I felt a lot of fear. I had picked up The Ordinary Parents Guide to Teaching Reading at the library, and used that while my son was in K to teach him how to read. I loved it so much I wanted to know who the author was. That book led me to TWTM. I felt like it was just put in my lap, and it was exactly what I needed. Prior to reading TWTM, I had no idea where to begin and I had no idea where I was headed. I had no idea what to use for curriculum and I didn't even know how to go about selecting what I needed. TWTM gave me immediate direction and a long-term goal to focus on. It answered all my questions and it gave me the confidence I needed.

 

It's normal to have fear about homeschooling. I still have moments where I panic, but they are very short-lived. I grow more confident every year.

 

Make a plan and know what your goals are. You can tweak things as you go, but you do need to know where you are headed. Also, do your research now, and pick curriculum that you feel you can teach with ease. I think too much emphasis gets put on the curriculum, and when issues arise, it seems that the answer is to toss the curriculum. I think that is probably the last thing that needs to be changed. Kids that are in PS are forced to adapt to whatever curriculum is being used. That is a freedom that you get when you homeschool, but I (personally) think it's better to make a list of the top 3 or 5 in each subject, and just pick one that suits you in regard to teaching and go with it! You can still adapt HOW you teach to your kids learning style. My ds6 is more hands-on, and I'm making sure that we have a lot of projects and activities planned for him. My older ds was not interested in the projects, and he just wanted to get the work done.

 

Just have a good, solid plan!

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I'm finishing up my 3rd year of homeschooling. I decided to homeschool my son when he was having issues in second grade. We decided to finish out the year and start homeschooling him for 3rd. We left my daughter in public school and I didn't take him off the school rollbooks until two weeks after school started because I didn't want to lose his magnet spot if I changed my mind. I was so scared! By end of first semester, DD wanted to come home and we brought her into the mix after 3rd quarter.

 

Now, I know homeschooling is the right choice for these particular kids, however there are days that I want to ship them off!

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