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HWOT question


Osaubi
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My ds5.5 has been using Kumon for his handwriting. While his Kumon pages look good, when he writes on his own not so much. He will forget how to write letters,write them backwards, upside down or from right to left. He gets easily frustrated when his letters don't come out the way he wants. Is Handwriting Without Tears a good fit?

 

TIA,

Kim

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My 8 y.o. who has been using HWT for a couple of years now, still needs reminders on how to form some letters. And my 5.5 y.o., who is nearly finished with HWT K book, still needs help with that, too.

 

So, I think you should keep going with what you have, as I don't necessarily think it's the curriculum, it's sounds like a developmental thing.

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My 8 y.o. who has been using HWT for a couple of years now, still needs reminders on how to form some letters. And my 5.5 y.o., who is nearly finished with HWT K book, still needs help with that, too.

 

So, I think you should keep going with what you have, as I don't necessarily think it's the curriculum, it's sounds like a developmental thing.

 

:iagree: My ds5 can trace letters from any workbook with ease. Ask him to write one on his own and he can't. Well, some letters he can. The easier ones he can. Letters like 's', lower case letters, etc. give him a big challenge. I just keep writing them for him lightly and having him trace. I also use the "dot to dot" method sometimes. I think it is a developmental issue...esp. for boys!

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HWT would be a perfect fit for your ds. The letters are grouped with other letters that have similar strokes. Teaching them in this order makes them easier to remember. For instance, all capital letters either start in the upper left corner and go down, or they move toward the upper left corner. Many lower case letters start the same way as a "c" (ie. a, d, e, g, o, q), so the "c" is taught firsts, then the others in the group are taught by "start with a c, then continue around . . ." The other letters are grouped the same way, helping with letter reversals and other common problems.

 

Also, HWT uses only two lines (instead of three or four), so it's easier to remember where to place the letters. And, in the workbooks, models are given all across the page. The child always has a perfect model to copy when he's practicing. This is better than only having one model on the left side of the page, which leads to worse and worse attempts as the child progresses across the page.

 

Anyway, I used HWT with both of my kids, and had great success. Many others here have had similar stories. I'd highly recommend it. It's not expensive, and it could make all the difference to your son.

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