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Middle School Recommendations for a Kinesthetic Learner


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Time Travelers for History.

For language arts I've found that simply having dd get up and work on the back window or on a large whiteboard or chalkboard helps. We've also played around with word tiles when diagramming (draw the diagram on a large sheet of paper and place the word tiles on it).

A lot of time it is just a matter of allowing dd to get up and move while I am teaching or reading. I've found the movement doesn't necessarily have to be tied in anyway to the content...it's just that she needs to be moving in order to think clearly.

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Generic: lapbooks, Outlining and note taking

 

Literature: Read dramas that can be acted out; Drawn into the Heart of Reading;

 

Writing: Writing that has a purpose -making a newsletter, etc.

 

 

Language Arts: All about Spelling, diagraming sentences; copywork

 

Math: Hands on Equations, Khan Academy (using the badge program)

 

Science Exploration Education Physics; incorporating scout badges; lots and lots of experiments; Nature Study and nature journal, leaf and insect collections

 

History: Anything that has hands on projects. My daughter is a visual/kinesthetic learner so I'm having her make a history scrapbook.

ANother one I'm looking at is American History Detective Book:

Hands on games like Axis and Allies or computer games

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Thanks so much for the suggestions. I can't believe it took all this time to figure out her learning style. Keep them coming.

 

I have been looking at Winston Grammar. I think she will like it since she likes AAS (which we just started using). I like the diagramming with the word tiles idea. I think the newsletter idea is funny since she was drawing cartoons yesterday which her brothers love and she said something about having to make a newsletter for them, a perfect opportunity to squeeze in writing. DITHOR was a bust for us. She does read though and has pretty good comprehension so I am thinking of not worrying about literature program until high school.

 

We have used MUS in the past and she hated it, but I might try it again for the higher math subjects. I bought HOE for my oldest so I already have that on hand, but did not know about the KHAN Academy badge. I thought it was just video lectures. Will have to look into that.

 

I love the look of Time Travelers, but is that just American History? History is not to much of a worry for me either as HOD does have enough hands on stuff for that.

 

I was wondering about Rainbow Science for Science would that be enough experiments or would I need to add more. I have Apologia General Science for my dd is there anything I could supplement that with to make it more hands on?

 

Also what about geography. I was thinking "Mapping the World with Art" but for 9th grade.

 

Thanks so much!

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I have Apologia General Science for my dd is there anything I could supplement that with to make it more hands on?

 

 

I am planning Apologia General Science with the notebook/lapbook from either

 

Knowledge Box Central - http://www.currclick.com/product_info.php?products_id=25593&it=1

 

or

 

Live and Learn Press - http://www.currclick.com/product_info.php?products_id=41910&it=1

 

I tried to do CLE Science 6 with DD11 this year, but the reading/filling in the blanks format did not work well for her. She is artsy/crafty, and I am hoping that the lapbooks will have the hands-on that she needs. The only problem that I have with the lapbooks mentioned above, is that I feel that they are a little juvenile, and if I had time, I would design my own that are a little, well, nicer.

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I am planning Apologia General Science with the notebook/lapbook from either

 

Knowledge Box Central - http://www.currclick.com/product_info.php?products_id=25593&it=1

 

or

 

Live and Learn Press - http://www.currclick.com/product_info.php?products_id=41910&it=1

 

I tried to do CLE Science 6 with DD11 this year, but the reading/filling in the blanks format did not work well for her. She is artsy/crafty, and I am hoping that the lapbooks will have the hands-on that she needs. The only problem that I have with the lapbooks mentioned above, is that I feel that they are a little juvenile, and if I had time, I would design my own that are a little, well, nicer.

 

Ooh, thanks for these links.

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It is so much fun to plan for new curriculum, but you may find that your child changes dramatically from 2nd grade to 6th grade. Or as some of us have found, from 6th grade to 7th grade. You as a teacher will grow and mature as well, as will your preferences for materials to teach from. Please don't think I am trying to stop you from spending a lovely afternoon with the Rainbow Resource catalog.;) Perhaps instead of picking specific curriculum, you might research and shape your goals and expectations for those years. Just a thought.

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It is so much fun to plan for new curriculum, but you may find that your child changes dramatically from 2nd grade to 6th grade..

 

I think this is her 2nd born\oldest dd...not a dd in 2nd. However, your advice is sound. My dd12 in just this past year has needed less and less kinesthethic techniques in certain subjects. I have read that a dc's learning styles can change throughout their childhood but typically will become cemented by the late teen years. Every few months I evaluate my dc's learning styles and will probably have to adapt many times before we are through. :D

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I think this is her 2nd born\oldest dd...not a dd in 2nd. However, your advice is sound. My dd12 in just this past year has needed less and less kinesthethic techniques in certain subjects. I have read that a dc's learning styles can change throughout their childhood but typically will become cemented by the late teen years. Every few months I evaluate my dc's learning styles and will probably have to adapt many times before we are through. :D

 

:blush:Oh dear! Thanks so much, Aimee, for translating. I was chewing my nails in envy thinking the Op was planning four years out and I had only covered through the end of the week.:tongue_smilie:

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Sorry for the confusion Lisa, Aimee is correct it is my 2nd born. She is going into 6th grade. When my oldest was in 2nd I did have my curriculum planned through high school :lol:, how little I knew then.

 

I do; however, already had my curriculum purchased for next year, but where dd11 was concerned I am just not settled in what I have chosen, especially in math. I then came across Winston Grammar and was curious what other subjects are geared more to the hands on learner. I am hoping that by 8th grade she won't need as much hands on (and she probably won't), but want to know what my options are just in case, especially since I have 3 boys coming up behind her. ;) and to satisfy the planner in me. :D

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It is so much fun to plan for new curriculum, but you may find that your child changes dramatically from 2nd grade to 6th grade. Or as some of us have found, from 6th grade to 7th grade. You as a teacher will grow and mature as well, as will your preferences for materials to teach from. Please don't think I am trying to stop you from spending a lovely afternoon with the Rainbow Resource catalog.;) Perhaps instead of picking specific curriculum, you might research and shape your goals and expectations for those years. Just a thought.

 

Amen to this. My younger child is pretty steady and incremental and likes to stay with a curriculum for a few years. The change usually makes sense. For instance, MUS Epsilon had grown boring after 3 years of MUS. She was ready to knock down decimals without spending a whole year, so we moved back to Singapore, and I'm fairly certain it will take her at least to, if not through, pre-algebra.

 

OTOH, my older daughter changes weekly. I used to keep 2-3 curriculum plans so I could catch her next zig or zag. I've learned to watch closely and capitalize on her natural curiosity and talent. I'm thrilled with what she has in her mental box as a 7th grader. I know what I'd like her to have by the end of 8th grade and have an idea what I'd like her to graduate high school with. But I also know that I can't pick the path for her now unless I'm willing to toss it over and change the route to our destination. She's an intense kid and harnessing that takes some work.

 

In all sincerity, GOOD LUCK!

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  • 4 weeks later...
Can you tell me about this? I am having my DD do a history scrapbook next year. How do you do a science one?

 

Well, this year dd learned about chemistry using RS4K Level 1 as a spine and supplementing with Elements:Ingredients of the Universe and library books. Once she had learned about a topic or scientist I felt was important I would have her do a page with a visual (sketched, printed, scrapbook paper that worked) along with a bit of a write up. Sometimes the "write up" would be bullet points while at other times she would write a poem or a paragraph. One page she titled "indicators of a chemical reaction" and glued in strips of scrapbook paper, one with bubbles that said "bubbles", one had what looks like water colors on it that said "change in color", etc. I told her that she or anyone else should be able to glance at the page and get a general idea about the topic. She is allowed to use colored pencils, rhinestones, and anything else she thinks adds to the comprehension of the topic. It has also been a good way to teach her a bit of art, especially the idea that sometimes less is more. Sometimes we'll also find a sentence to imitate that we parse and then try to include in a write up. I feel that if she can communicate about a topic in one page or even a two page spread she probably has actually learned something.

 

hth

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I was wondering about Rainbow Science for Science would that be enough experiments or would I need to add more. I have Apologia General Science for my dd is there anything I could supplement that with to make it more hands on?

 

 

 

We enjoyed Rainbow Science and there should be enough experiments, but many people find there isn't enough reading to cement the material. This is one science I'm keeping to use with my kinesthetic, younger DD. I think since she is more kinesthetic that the experiments will cement the material for her more so than a beefier text.

 

The two best things about Rainbow Science is 1) the science is solid and 2) it's incredibly easy to implement! It can be completed semi-independently, but most of the experiments are fun so it was a pleasure to do them with my older DD.

 

ETA: A history program I keep drooling over is "Tools for Young Historians" by Brimwood Press. It looks excellent for a kinesthetic learner:

http://www.brimwoodpress.com/productover.html

Edited by amtmcm
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My ds (6th/7th) is a kin/audio learner, my dd (7th/8th) can learn using just about any style. Since I decided to combine a lot of subjects this/next year (we actually are starting to transition into next year's work now) we are leaning towards my son's learning style (this also gives me an opportunity to focus on a fun program for my dd's final year before High School). Here are some of the things we are already or will be using.

 

We use an Oregon Scientific Globe for geography. The kids love the "hands on" study of geography. I do plan on buying various board games for geography as well. And I bought a really nice compass for "treasure hunts".

 

We construct "keeper" notebooks (using composition notebooks) for most subjects. Regular exercises go into ordinary notebooks, but I will often assign pictures, poems, charts, outlines etc... for their "special" notebooks. Also all final writing drafts of their best written work go in these. They love to read through them again and again.

 

Wrap Ups are great for math. You can buy the complete sets with workbooks and CD's for fairly cheap.

 

We are constructing timeline books for each time period (we use blank board books, when we are done they will have a complete timeline series). I also have them do at least one hands on project for every time period.

 

For science we will be using a lot of different things, our primary spine will be earth science (MODG's living books syllabus), with plans to have them do many "earthy" experiments. We will also be using "Cooking & Science", a chemistry set, K'nex Intro to Bridges, and a hands on physics project kit.

 

We will be getting them their own computer where they will take typing lessons, a computer art appreciation program, and a computer graphics program.

 

My husband also teaches them an actual art/drawing class.

 

So far, just with what we have started using, we have all been having so much fun learning! I am really excited at what else this/next year will bring. :001_smile:

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