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Memoria Press Christian Studies.. tell me your experience


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Has anyone used these on here? Are they young earth, and how prevalent is that? Do you have to have the children's Bible they suggest, or can you make any one work?

 

Any thing you can tell me about it would be great. I don't know anyone IRL who has used this. Thanks!

 

Oh, and I am looking mostly for my 4th grader next year, but might consider it for my 2nd grader too if I love it.

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Okay, here goes :). We have it on the shelf, I've looked through it, but I haven't found a time slot for it yet, so we have yet to start. I recommend getting the story Bible that goes along with it, because the student book is a workbook style and is designed to go with the specific stories from the specific story Bible. If you use another story Bible you'll have to break in different places, or it might just not work out as smoothly if that makes sense.

 

They take a very straight-forward approach to the Bible, because it IS a story Bible we are talking about here :). Everything is pretty literal, so yes, I'd say it's YE :).

 

What I really, really like is that it includes...maps! Yes indeed :). One of my 'must have' things is including mapping along with any Bible-type program. ALSO, because it is a classical curriculum it also includes a lot of suggestions for review, teaching the books of the Bible, teaching how to classify the different books of the Bible into categories etc. and that is pretty neat to me!

 

If you are looking for anything specific you can ask, and I'll look it up :). My daughter is really excited to get started, but again...I'm looking for a time slot!

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  • 1 month later...

I have used Christian Studies I and II with my kiddos. We were a bit ahead of grade level for my daughter, who had difficulty with answering some of the questions, but we did the questions orally together. I try to keep my ds 11 and dd9 together on as many subjects as possible, so I just had her join in as she is an excellent reader. She just needed help coming up with answers that required coming up with an answer that wasn't plainly stated in the passage but required you to draw a conclusion.

 

The Bible used is the Golden Children's Bible. I love this Bible for kids! I want my kids to be familiar with the entire Bible at a young age. While this doesn't contain the entire Bible, it does include the major events and the language used is appropriate and easy enough for my kids to understand. The goal for this currciulum, as I believe I read somewhere in MP materials, is basic Biblical literacy.

 

There is a memory verse for each lesson, but we didn't do all of those because my kids are in Awana, and they memorize Scripture for that. Also, it took extra time for them to work on some of the longer memory passages, so we spent extra time on those and skipped some of the shorter verses. Yes there is map work--so that when you are reading the Bible you may be able to recall the locations of important places without having to consult your maps later on.

 

The very first passage memorized is Genesis 1: 26- 28: And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the fowl of the air and over all the earth. So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them. And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it.

 

Hope this helps!

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As I didn't really touch on the young earth issue, I thought I would reply again. The creation aspect--God as a literal Creator--is definitely stressed in the parts of Book I when you are studying Creation. I don't think the YE issue specifically is dealt with, but I could be wrong. We did Book I two years ago. I may have to dig up Book I from the attic to see if I can answer this better for you.

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Others have basically answered, but I'll go ahead and join in...

 

It's, as someone else said, a Biblical literacy course. It's *not* a devotional program and doctrinal commentary is very limited. I would say it avoids YE/OE debates pretty well by focusing only on the stories from the Bible -- so you'll get the Genesis story, but it's up to you (the teacher/parent) to explain to your child how your family interprets those passages -- whether as scientific fact or truth-revealing literature or something in between.

 

I would NOT use this program with an 8yo, and probably not a 9yo (even a very strong reader) except as part of a group/family study. Some of the comprehension questions are quite challenging and require *more* information than is contained in the story Bible assignments. These work well for discussion (with an adult who is very familiar with the Bible), but could be extremely frustrating for a child who is handed the workbook and told, "Go write the answers for these questions."

 

Each lesson (I believe there are 30 lessons with an additional review chapter after every 5 lessons) includes names/places/phrases to learn (perhaps by making flash cards -- or just discussing regularly for familiarity), comprehension questions (mostly quite straightforward "what happened in the reading", though some involve drawing conclusions or looking for material beyond what is covered in Golden Children's Bible), memory work (you could choose these as your primary Bible memory, or simple read several times each for familiarity), and sometimes mapwork or a suggestion for drawing or discussion of an illustration from the GCB, etc.

 

If you use it for the teacher as a guide to what to read and discuss each week, I think you can use it with fairly young children. If you expect to hand it over to the child, I would recommend beginning in 5th grade or so.

 

I do recommend using the GCB and not attempting to substitute another story Bible. But I like the GCB a lot. It retains much of the KJV language, while editing a bit for children.

 

My older child has done the first two levels in grades 6 and 7 (these cover the OT) and will use the third in the fall (NT). It's a bit dry, but I feel that it has done a better job of covering the stories of the Bible than other programs I've looked at. ... I considered starting my dd with it this coming year, but she doesn't enjoy Bible stories as much as her brother, and I'm afraid the dryness of it (the workbook, not the story Bible) would really turn her off. I'll reconsider next year.

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I know that MP says one should start with Christian Studies I, but I was wondering if one could begin with vol. 2. We just finished reading through the OT while studying ancient history this year and I would rather move on in our studies to the NT, but I thought it might be nice to use their program as a guide rather than just reading through our children's Bible.

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It's, as someone else said, a Biblical literacy course. It's *not* a devotional program and doctrinal commentary is very limited. I would say it avoids YE/OE debates pretty well by focusing only on the stories from the Bible -- so you'll get the Genesis story, but it's up to you (the teacher/parent) to explain to your child how your family interprets those passages -- whether as scientific fact or truth-revealing literature or something in between.

 

Agreed.

 

I would NOT use this program with an 8yo, and probably not a 9yo (even a very strong reader) except as part of a group/family study. Some of the comprehension questions are quite challenging and require *more* information than is contained in the story Bible assignments. These work well for discussion (with an adult who is very familiar with the Bible), but could be extremely frustrating for a child who is handed the workbook and told, "Go write the answers for these questions."
:001_huh: Now, you are scaring me...I have Christian Studies I planned for the upcoming school year, which is 3th grade for my eldest. I was planning on reading the text together, then letting her start with the questions and after she had a go at them we would discuss them together.

 

Do I really need to wait until 5-6th grade (this is going to totally ruin my beautiful long term planning spreadsheet :lol:)??

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:001_huh: Now, you are scaring me...I have Christian Studies I planned for the upcoming school year, which is 3th grade for my eldest. I was planning on reading the text together, then letting her start with the questions and after she had a go at them we would discuss them together.

 

Do I really need to wait until 5-6th grade (this is going to totally ruin my beautiful long term planning spreadsheet :lol:)??

 

I think it'll be fine. You just may find yourself more involved with the workbook work than you had planned. ... My main concern is for people who think they'll be able to hand the program off to a 3rd or 4th grader and have them work through it on their own. It just isn't designed for that.

 

One alternative would be to read the story, then go over the workbook pages orally together -- then let her fill in the answers on her own (perhaps later in the week).

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I think it'll be fine. You just may find yourself more involved with the workbook work than you had planned. ... My main concern is for people who think they'll be able to hand the program off to a 3rd or 4th grader and have them work through it on their own. It just isn't designed for that.

 

One alternative would be to read the story, then go over the workbook pages orally together -- then let her fill in the answers on her own (perhaps later in the week).

 

More involved with the workbook than I had planned...bwahahahaha :lol:. Sorry, I just had to laugh really hard at that, because I'm translating the workbook into Dutch at the moment...so becoming even *more* involved is really not possible :D.

 

But I get what you mean. I had not planned on it being a totally independent subject, so that is not a problem. I like that there are facts to memorize, reading comprehension questions (we have never done that before, so I would like for her to get some practice with that sort of questions), map work and that it is a general Biblical literacy course. Next year I plan on doing it in English, combining Biblical literacy and English studies, and I doubt that she will be able to do it independently then.

 

Thanks!

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We've used 1-3. It is the same format as their other study guides. They are excellent. They look at people, places, scripture, where, and yes, maps. There is no discussion of young earth/ old earth. It is a straight forward, excellent overview of the Bible. Highly recommended, as are the rest of MP resources, imho.

You don't have to do them in sequence to get a lot out of them.

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I know I PM'd you about the YE issue and how the first dates given are for Abraham around 2000 BC (standard chronology), but I wanted to add that we ARE doing this orally together, it's very easy to do that way. There is a LOT of writing in the workbook :). So we aren't writing in it at all - just doing it orally and doing visual map drills :).

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My older child has done the first two levels in grades 6 and 7 (these cover the OT) and will use the third in the fall (NT). It's a bit dry, but I feel that it has done a better job of covering the stories of the Bible than other programs I've looked at. ... I considered starting my dd with it this coming year, but she doesn't enjoy Bible stories as much as her brother, and I'm afraid the dryness of it (the workbook, not the story Bible) would really turn her off. I'll reconsider next year.

 

Your whole review was so helpful. But this part made me decide to hold off. My kids will be in 5th and 4th, and I think how dry it is would turn them off too. I like that it's a Biblical literacy course and not a devotional. I think we'll find a lighter overview this year and look at this course again next year.

 

Now I just wish I could use Telling God's Story with all. I'm getting it for my 2nd grader and wonder if I can somehow beef it up a little for the older two.

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We've used 1-3. It is the same format as their other study guides. They are excellent. They look at people, places, scripture, where, and yes, maps. There is no discussion of young earth/ old earth. It is a straight forward, excellent overview of the Bible. Highly recommended, as are the rest of MP resources, imho.

You don't have to do them in sequence to get a lot out of them.

 

:iagree:

 

We do it together as a family (7 and 5yo). Each person has their own copy of the Golden Children's Bible. The questions are answered orally, however, the reviews and tests are done/written only by our oldest. Usually the 5yo reads and answers the easy questions, while the older one fields the harder stuff. One afternoon a week, ~1-1.5 hours (including learning the memorywork).

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  • 10 months later...

Does anyone have anything current to share about this curriculum?

 

I'm thinking of using it primarily as a reading program. The comprehension questions and vocabulary lessons look appropriate for that. And the text of the Golden Bible looks appropriate for read aloud practice.

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Well, this is an old thread. I never did purchase it, so nothing more to add. I still really want it for this year.

 

The only thing new I have to add is its expensive when I have to get the Bible too when I have so many perfectly good children's versions here already and have so much to buy for other subjects. But then I read this thread and I want it again. I have really liked everything MP I have bought or looked through. I am sure it is really good.

 

Did I mention that I really want to purchase this??

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We have been using CSI and have CSII on the shelf to do next. The kids enjoy it but like other MP products it can be very dry. I enjoy the maps that are included. The lessons are straight forward, you read the golden bible (yes get the right one), and then answer questions based on the story. There is a memory verse, and other passages you can look up in an actual bible, plus map work and at times other parts to teh assignments, like an illustration.

 

I like that while it uses a storybook bible it is very much to the point of looking at the bible academically not just devotionally. Most bible programs (and we use another one in addition to CS) are more devotional in nature whereas CS is more academic kwim.

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I already have the Golden Bible. I recently bought it from B&N with a large coupon. I went online looking for lesson plans and that is how I found MP CS. I really like the Golden Bible for reading aloud practice. I like that the CP lessons include even more KJV vocabulary without the child having to read long stretched of KJV text aloud.

 

I'm a big believer in students LISTENING to the KJV, but I find it too difficult for them to practice reading aloud with, and I've been seizing a lot again, and the seizures somehow fry my speech areas of the brain, and I can't read the KJV aloud either right now.

 

I feel like I will get the best of both worlds with the KJV memory verses and the Golden Bible text. I had been using the NIrV for reading aloud, but the very blatant use of certain vocabulary is a bit off-putting at times. I used to believe in children reading every word of the Bible, but...as I'm getting older, I'm questioning the need to introduce the child to the entire Biblical library right away. I don't think it was written for that. I believe different books have different audiences and purposes. Some books and some verses really can and SHOULD wait.

 

The student I am tutoring the most right now is an adult, but she shares everything I teach her with her nieces and nephews, and...I just want to choose the best, because I am setting dominoes in motion that are leading to places I know little about.

 

I like the pictures in the Golden Bible. They are appropriate and interesting for all age groups.

 

I have to wait until the first of the month, if I do buy CS 1, so it will give me time to think about this. I think I want to try this though.

 

Can you tell me more about the maps? I didn't see them in the samples.

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Just wanted to mention, the Golden Children's Bible is 1/3 off, only $11.99 at CBD.com... we purchased this recently and REALLY like it.

 

We're not doing MP's Bible curriculum, although we've looked at it. I do think we're going to use their CS IV, which is a one year overview, toward the end of the elementary years as preparation for deeper studies in middle and high school.

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I really like the Golden Bible for reading aloud practice.

 

Even with Amazon free shipping, the CS curriculum is almost $40.00. That's a lot :-( It's not the comprehension questions that are drawing me, but more the vocabulary and maps.

 

I used R&S Bible years and years ago when it first came out. For people wanting to use the KJV and not the Golden Bible, they might like that option better. It's been a long time, but I think it provided a lot of what MP CS does in the way of maps and vocabulary.

 

I should probably use the Bible curricula I already have, and just use the Golden Bible as a SUPPLEMENT for reading aloud practice, instead of planning to read through the GB, and make it the core.

 

CS really is NOT cheap! Especially when I'm finding that students want their own copies of EVERYTHING we use, and also want to give copies to relatives and friends.

 

What I want for my own self-education is one thing, but lately I'm, feeling very pressured to pick lower priced materials to tutor with.

 

I really want this, but...I think I'm going to have to pass. :crying: Later on I may just have to buy myself a copy, just because...I don't know why. Because I just really like some books.

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Well our Barnes and Noble is having Teacher Appreciation week that ends today. They have the GCB on shelf and I can get it for 25% off today only. Of course then I still have to add the addtl $40 to my MP order for the T.M and workbook.

 

It sounds like exactly what we need around here. My youngest could use the extra Bible knowledge and reading aloud practice. My older could use the additional academic Bible work.

 

Decisions, decisions..

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My child hated it with a fiery passion. Memory work, map work, ugly illustrations and the stories were just not inspiring.

 

Keep Talking Elizabeth. Make me HATE this curriculum! My finger is itching to hit "buy". I have just enough in my account to cover it. There are just 8 days till check day. I could risk an empty account that long. I'm caving. SAVE ME!

 

I have this thing about KJV vocabulary studies. I adore them. Is there anything bad about the KJV vocabulary studies?

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We did book 1 completely. Books 2 and 3 as discussion starters. You must have the recommended Bible. But that being said it is a lovely version. Probably my favorite "big kids" Bible. The program is a lot of writing. You read a story. We did this together. Then answer a fairly extensive set of essay questions. Maps. Other question formats -- matching included. I agree suited for older -- maybe 10 plus in complete form.

 

I bought just the teachers guides for the last 2 years. Read Bible and discussed using the guide. Great maps. Actually used as a reference in our house now. The easy answers.

 

I think it is simply a literal scripture course. No more or less young earth then reading the Bible. It is more comprehension than anything.

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We did book 1 completely. Books 2 and 3 as discussion starters. You must have the recommended Bible. But that being said it is a lovely version. Probably my favorite "big kids" Bible. The program is a lot of writing. You read a story. We did this together. Then answer a fairly extensive set of essay questions. Maps. Other question formats -- matching included. I agree suited for older -- maybe 10 plus in complete form.

 

I bought just the teachers guides for the last 2 years. Read Bible and discussed using the guide. Great maps. Actually used as a reference in our house now. The easy answers.

 

I think it is simply a literal scripture course. No more or less young earth then reading the Bible. It is more comprehension than anything.

 

Do you think this would be okay to start with a 7th grader? I've read a children's bible to my kids every year since pre-k. My mother just gave me my childhood copy of The Golden Bible and I know my son would love it if I read that, but I've been concerned that it is too young for him and that I should be moving on to a complete bible. I'd probably use the program the same way you have and just get the teacher's guides.

 

Lisa

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Ummmm Jesus is blonde :confused:

 

:lol: I'm sorry but this made me giggle. We are LDS and the pictures are very different from what we are used to. My kids and I enjoy discussing them.

 

I do use CS I with a 14yo. My basic goal is to familiarize her with the Old Testament before she starts a study of the New Testament in the fall. Together we read The Golden Bible and the information in CS I. Over the next day or two we read the corresponding chapters in the KJV. I also share with her any information that I might be able to find in manuals from our church. Not only is she learning OT stories but it gives us a chance to discuss why we believe what we do. It has led to some amazing discussions and a lot of "I don't know. Let's see what we can find" rabbit trails.

 

We don't do the scripture memorization and all questions are answered orally.

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I've used the first few weeks of CS 1 with a 3rd & 5th grader, both reluctant writers. I had to spread the activities out over the week, and the children usually only wrote one long or two short answers per day. The story and the vocabulary were presented upfront, then the rest of the activities were divided among 5 days. We discussed the answers orally, then I wrote it down and the 3rd grader copied. The 5th grader could write it in his own words, buy my little one just wasn't there yet. I was so stuck to the idea of them having written answers to look back on for review and to get it ingrained into their memories through writing.

 

We dropped it after few weeks... heh. Maybe it would have worked if we did the longer questions orally. I want to get back to it in a couple years. I think for a 7th grader, as a PP asked about above, it would go much smoother & quicker, as writing 1 - 3 sentences for an answer on a page with 5-7 questions wouldn't be a big deal by then.

 

While it contains questions specific to the GCB (you would need it to do the program), there are also useful teacher notes offering background info. that was sometimes new to me. There are page numbers listed for the GCB and there are also regular Scriptures references given. Emphasis is placed on salvation history in vol. 1, and no specific mention of YE or OE dates, just Creation.

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Lisa,

 

I don't see why these couldn't be used with older children. The important thing is to pick something that you can and will do. Bible study is something that can be easily dropped if the format is too hard or the specific views don't quite line up. I know my house is littered with discards-- we do always have something going -- it just changes frequently!

 

These study guides we liked. Easy to use except for the writing if your Dc doesn't write easily. I just pulled them off the third floor bookshelf-- huge effort, all those stairs! They have a lot of good stuff. While you child won't want to draw pictures he probably would be glad to study the Bible in an understandable way. I am now wondering about my ds12. He probably would like this again.

 

The teacher guides are typical Memoria press if you have used or seen their Latin. The weekly worksheets contain all answers with surrounding teacher's notes. There are blank cumulative tests at the back. Short answer.

 

Hope this helps!

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Lisa,

 

I don't see why these couldn't be used with older children. The important thing is to pick something that you can and will do. Bible study is something that can be easily dropped if the format is too hard or the specific views don't quite line up. I know my house is littered with discards-- we do always have something going -- it just changes frequently!

 

These study guides we liked. Easy to use except for the writing if your Dc doesn't write easily. I just pulled them off the third floor bookshelf-- huge effort, all those stairs! They have a lot of good stuff. While you child won't want to draw pictures he probably would be glad to study the Bible in an understandable way. I am now wondering about my ds12. He probably would like this again.

 

The teacher guides are typical Memoria press if you have used or seen their Latin. The weekly worksheets contain all answers with surrounding teacher's notes. There are blank cumulative tests at the back. Short answer.

 

Hope this helps!

 

Thanks! I noticed their was a Christian Studies IV on Memoria Press's website that is basically an overview of the entire Bible. I think I might just get the teacher guide for that and use it to stimulate some discussion. We could use it over one or two years. If the maps are in there, we'd probably use those as well. I'd love to do the whole program, but I can tell I'm already going to have a hard time finishing everything we've got planned for next year as it is.

 

Lisa

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I have seen scattered complaints about the pictures, but no matter how petty the complaints, there was nothing about the blonde Jesus. I find that to be a more glaring and important issue than a picture of a statue :-0 I don't think it's the pictures themselves, as the reviews, that have me so shocked.

 

Who is the reoccurring other blonde person? I can't figure out if it's a man or woman.

 

I have some of the Bible Adventure Timeline resources that follow the salvation history. I'm really interested in resources that cover that topic. I don't know if these curricula are compatible.

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I have some of the Bible Adventure Timeline resources that follow the salvation history.

 

My older kids have used the Teen Timeline, and I can't recommend it highly enough! We've watched the videos several times, and everything stops in our house whenever Mark Hart is on. He's just brilliant. My kids think he's hilarious. I love all the Great Adventure materials though. :)

 

Anyway, I think it would be fine to use both. However, MP's CS is going to seem mighty boring next to the Great Adventure stuff!

 

Another alternative would be to use MP's Intro to Classical Studies, which goes through the Golden Children's Bible over 30 weeks, and lines it up with Famous Men of Rome and D'Aulaire's Greek Myths. My 5th grader is using it this year. He'd already read FMR and D'Aulaire's, so we just dropped those and he's doing the work for GCB.

 

Personally, I'm not crazy about the GCB for older kids. I think they should be reading the actual Bible, even for basic Bible literacy. There's something to be said for learning how to navigate a real Bible, and I found that my kids connected more to a real Bible than to the Bible storybooks.

 

ETA: Oh yeah, and those illustrations drive me nuts too, especially the blonde Jesus. That's another reason I prefer using a real Bible to the GCB.

Edited by sailmom
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My older kids have used the Teen Timeline, and I can't recommend it highly enough! We've watched the videos several times, and everything stops in our house whenever Mark Hart is on. He's just brilliant. My kids think he's hilarious. I love all the Great Adventure materials though. :)

 

Anyway, I think it would be fine to use both. However, MP's CS is going to seem mighty boring next to the Great Adventure stuff!

 

Another alternative would be to use MP's Intro to Classical Studies, which goes through the Golden Children's Bible over 30 weeks, and lines it up with Famous Men of Rome and D'Aulaire's Greek Myths. My 5th grader is using it this year. He'd already read FMR and D'Aulaire's, so we just dropped those and he's doing the work for GCB.

 

Personally, I'm not crazy about the GCB for older kids. I think they should be reading the actual Bible, even for basic Bible literacy. There's something to be said for learning how to navigate a real Bible, and I found that my kids connected more to a real Bible than to the Bible storybooks.

 

ETA: Oh yeah, and those illustrations drive me nuts too, especially the blonde Jesus. That's another reason I prefer using a real Bible to the GCB.

 

I don't have any of the teen items and no videos. I just have a random collection of pieces, so far.

 

I'm wanting to use GCB as a reading book. I'm tutoring a student who is not ready to read the KJV aloud yet, and my seizures scramble the speech areas of my brain, and I can't read it either right now. I want to heavily supplement with KJV audio, but feel like I need the GCB as a crutch right now. I'm looking at the Christian Studies as frosting and pacing and for whatever it can deliver, but it is the CGB that is my priority right now. My student needs a reading book, vocabulary studies, some consistency and a chance to practice her handwriting. I think boring will be fine.

 

I'm off to look at the classical studies workbooks. Thanks for the tip.

 

Did you make any effort to talk about the timeline periods that the GCB stories fall into? Or did you just let the two curricula do their own thing their own way, and not try and combine them?

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LOL at the blonde Jesus. I actually went ahead and bought the GCB the other day and that is the first thing I said when I got home and looked through it too!!

 

Other than that though, I recognize this Bible as one I read often as a child, and so did my dh. So I pointed out the blond Jesus pics to my children and we talked about them. Beyond that, I think I am going to like it.

 

I guess I will go ahead and get the guides to go too. I am not looking for another curric for my kids to have to write, but the discussion and maps will be used.

 

Thanks for everyone's help with this.

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  • 1 month later...

Ok, I know this is re-resurrecting an old thread, BUT I just want to double check from what I'm getting here -

This would NOT be a good choice for a third grader and a first grader, right?

Because I really like the look of it, but from the sound of it, it's too advanced for my boys.

And I just want to double....(triple)...check. :D

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I just got my copy in the mail, and I agree. I think it is included in MP's 3rd grade curric pack. I just wouldn't think a first grader could memorize the long passages and get all of the vocabulary and such. But could definitely listen in for the stories and discussions.

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Ok, I know this is re-resurrecting an old thread, BUT I just want to double check from what I'm getting here -

This would NOT be a good choice for a third grader and a first grader, right?

Because I really like the look of it, but from the sound of it, it's too advanced for my boys.

And I just want to double....(triple)...check. :D

 

It matters how you use it. Sometimes I use curricula for ME to teach ME and pace ME, but then directly teach the student with what I now KNOW. I bought level 1, and intend at some point to buy levels 2 and 3. I will sometimes use the reading comp questions with students at a higher level than grade 3 (typical American public school grade 3) reading. I'll use the maps. Not the rest though, as I have better things. For grade 3, I would only use the comp questions orally, and without the idea of "right" and "wrong" answers.

 

I love CGB as a READING book. I love having comp questions for it, with an answer key. I love having maps handy. I'm too much of a curriculum junkie to really buckle down and use it as written.

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  • 1 year later...

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