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Horizons vs BJU Math


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We've used BJU Math for several years now. I've tried Horizons in the past, but (at the time) just couldn't get used to the "spinning out of control" feel of the multiple topics and weird way that it introduced a topic and then dropped it. I also desired a conceptual introduction, rather than a "just do it" algorithm approach (ex: BJU uses tens/ones to introduce adding with carrying/renaming, whereas Horizons just has you carry the one).

 

I have a much better understanding of math now, and I also bought the Math Mammoth Blue series to help deepen our study of math. I've noticed, though, that Horizons covers a lot more topics than BJU and has a higher expectation for the student. Some topics BJU barely covers or doesn't introduce at all. I'm also noticing that Time4Learning is also introducing some topics in 4th gr math that BJU doesn't teach yet. We're already behind in math & trying to catch up. I'm concerned that BJU covers so much less topically than Horizons and T4L. I'm thinking Horizons is really preparing the student for preAlg in 7th gr, whereas BJU is probably gearing that toward 8th gr. I'm thinking about switching to Horizons (& using MM to help deepen our understanding). But OTOH, I'm concerned that maybe having sooo many topics is not a good idea, either.

 

Horizons vs BJU - what do you think? Is it better to have a simple, conceptual understanding of math (BJU) or to have the spiral, multi-topics, pre-Alg work of Horizons? Esp for a child that is already behind & trying to catch up (BTW, she's behind because of *my* poor teaching, but I've learned my lesson and she is working with me to catch up).

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We've used BJU Math for several years now. I've tried Horizons in the past, but (at the time) just couldn't get used to the "spinning out of control" feel of the multiple topics and weird way that it introduced a topic and then dropped it. I also desired a conceptual introduction, rather than a "just do it" algorithm approach (ex: BJU uses tens/ones to introduce adding with carrying/renaming, whereas Horizons just has you carry the one).

 

I have a much better understanding of math now, and I also bought the Math Mammoth Blue series to help deepen our study of math. I've noticed, though, that Horizons covers a lot more topics than BJU and has a higher expectation for the student. Some topics BJU barely covers or doesn't introduce at all. I'm also noticing that Time4Learning is also introducing some topics in 4th gr math that BJU doesn't teach yet. We're already behind in math & trying to catch up. I'm concerned that BJU covers so much less topically than Horizons and T4L. I'm thinking Horizons is really preparing the student for preAlg in 7th gr, whereas BJU is probably gearing that toward 8th gr. I'm thinking about switching to Horizons (& using MM to help deepen our understanding). But OTOH, I'm concerned that maybe having sooo many topics is not a good idea, either.

 

Horizons vs BJU - what do you think? Is it better to have a simple, conceptual understanding of math (BJU) or to have the spiral, multi-topics, pre-Alg work of Horizons? Esp for a child that is already behind & trying to catch up (BTW, she's behind because of *my* poor teaching, but I've learned my lesson and she is working with me to catch up).

 

I cannot speak about BJU but I can tell you that we love Horizons. The spiral approach has been fantastic for us and we've never felt that "spinning out of control" feeling you mentioned. It has been thorough and rigorous and ds9 has always scored at least a year or more above grade level every time he has been tested. We use Horizons as written including many of the suggested activities in the TM (especially when they are younger - this is where you get lots of the conceptual understanding in this program I have found).

 

8filltheheart has done posts in the past about her use of Horizons and how well she has felt it has prepared her dc for higher math. My oldest in in Horizons 5 now so hopefully my story will echo hers soon! I am heading out the door or I would link a few old posts. Maybe someone else will chime in and link one or two! :)

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I can't tell you what to do, but I am another Horizons fan. There is plenty of conceptual instruction and use of manipulatives if one uses the TM. There is also a lot of drill as instructed in the TM which helps cement the lessons much better than just using the workbooks alone. I prefer the spiral approach because I want my kids to get a lot of review to make sure that they are maintaining their knowledge and skills throughout the year. Supplementing with another program is a good idea, though, if it helps you teach the concepts better. I hope you find what works best for you.

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I am another "HHH" (happy Horizon homeschooler!) :lol:

 

I use the TM and try to do most of the things it schedules. I've found that my boys understand the concepts and do very well in math. My kids appreciate the colorful "fun looking" pages. Horizons has lots of puzzle-type activites that reinforce math that my kids enjoy.

 

We don't supplement with anything, nor have I felt that we needed anything more than what Horizons provides.

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Can you give me an example of prealgebra and other topics not covered in BJU up to grade 4? My ds has completed BJU 2, 3 & almost 4 and I would like to know if there are areas I should supplement.

 

I have been VERY pleased with BJU and do consider much of the concepts to include prealgebra content- time elapsed, missing addend/multiplier, "number factory" grids, negative values and number lines, and even "variable" letter problems... I read elsewhere that the highest achieving half of BJU students would be able skip 7th grade math and go straight to Prealgebra. My ds has near-perfect scores on his math assignments and tests, so the only worries I have are with his speed, attitude and possible scope/sequence gaps. Math is the subject that develops ds's character. ;)

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Hi Sarah,

 

 

:seeya:It's me, your SoF pal. This reminds me of the many math discussions we have had. I have liked Horizons, esp. through 4th grade. Regarding the spiral approach, vs. the other, I had my ds working in a workbook that covered one topic at a time & he found it very boring and tedious doing a whole lesson of the same type of problems, esp. when he already understood it. He has enjoyed the variety in the Horizon's lessons.

 

I do find Horizons works best when you do the actual lesson with them that is outlined in the TM. Many times there isn't one in the 4th & 5th grade manuals, but when there is, my ds does so much better if I do it.

 

I have heard the Horizons scope & sequence is advanced, but I have nothing to compare it to. Except when he was in 2nd grade, I looked at Saxon & he was beyond what they were covering.

 

We don't find the spiral approach confusing. The new topic is introduced in the workbook lesson & then practiced in activity 1 in each lesson. The the rest of the exercises are practice from previous lessons. Sometimes they have quite a bit of review at the beginning of the year (sometimes too much), but I'm finding in the 6th grade curriculum they are introducing new topics early on.

 

I never used Bob Jones, but did look at it a couple of years ago. Horizons appears to be less work for the teacher. And Horizons did seem ahead of BJU. But BJU seemed to provide more explanation in the lesson that the teacher presents. I do think that sometimes Horizons does not provide enough explanation, but I have been able to find sometime online in those few instances.

 

Hope this helps and good luck with your decision.

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We have been using Horizons going on 4 yrs now. We have had our bumps along the way. Usually they would come about when I started to neglect looking at the TM to see if there were any activities/tips that we needed to do. So I would have to go back and explain again with the activities and then we could move on. I have heard many people say the TM is not needed. I am a firm believer that it IS definately needed, unless you are a trained math teacher or are very good at explaining new concepts on a childs level (which is not me).

 

All that being said, we LOVE math and my son is doing very well with it. You don't have to supplement at all with this program. I too purchased the MM download though lol. I think it was just too tempting. So if there is ever a time when I feel he needs a better grasp of something we have that to fall back on.

 

BTW I don't think that spiral learning is for every child though. So it really depends on how your child learns. Maybe if you crossed out some of the problems it wouldn't seem so daunting. That is what we do. Most of the time we cross out half of the problems that are review.

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Can you give me an example of prealgebra and other topics not covered in BJU up to grade 4? My ds has completed BJU 2, 3 & almost 4 and I would like to know if there are areas I should supplement.

 

Sometimes I miss seeing things, too, so it's possible I missed something somewhere, but ...

Volume (just found this at the end of BJU 4, but its been taught in Horizons since 3rd?)

Factor trees

Lowest Common Denominator

Ratios? (the thingies on the placement test for 3rd gr - never saw those before!)

Missing addend (yes, BJU does this, too, but its the way Horizons does it that feels more like what they'll do in pre-alg. Horizons actually has them do the same to each side: n - 2 = 6; n -2 +2 = 6 + 2; cross out 2s; n=8)

Reducing fractions happens earlier in Horizons

multiplying big number by small (47 x 3 or bigger) happens at the beginning of 3rd Horizons, end of 3rd BJU (not a big deal & I'd rather have conceptual understanding, but...)

 

I could be wrong on when these things happen because I don't have Horizons in front of me, just going off of what I remember seeing. Also, I was a little freaked because I looked at a sample CAT test for 3rd (wanting to prepare both kids for IOWA & was looking for sample tests) and the questions were way more than we've covered in 3rd gr. So I began thinking we weren't preparing very well.

 

My ds has near-perfect scores on his math assignments and tests, so the only worries I have are with his speed, attitude and possible scope/sequence gaps. Math is the subject that develops ds's character. ;)

 

Dd10 has had a better attitude this year, whereas dd8 has been really testing me every single day. We're working on speed & attitude. We also are filling the math fact gap (that's where I was a bad momma, but now I'm reformed). I also wonder if they'd remember better with a Horizons format rather than BJU, where they see it once a year & then it drops off the radar until next year. OTOH, there are a lot of topics that we just don't need to beat a dead horse over (telling time, measurement, money...seriously, we get it).

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Hi Sarah,

 

:seeya:It's me, your SoF pal. This reminds me of the many math discussions we have had. I have liked Horizons, esp. through 4th grade. Regarding the spiral approach, vs. the other, I had my ds working in a workbook that covered one topic at a time & he found it very boring and tedious doing a whole lesson of the same type of problems, esp. when he already understood it. He has enjoyed the variety in the Horizon's lessons.

 

 

Hi Sherri! Thanks for the input! I think you are right about the differences (that's why I went to BJU instead - needed the explanations). Now I'm finding it difficult to read the BJU TM so I watch a Khan Academy video instead (its easier to watch a 2 min video with the toddler around). I'm also thinking it might be easier for the kids to learn somewhat independently (within reason) with Horizons than BJU.

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Horizon's is much faster off the block than BJU. In fact Horizon's 2 moved on way too quickly which is why we didn't use it.

 

BJU is more steady and slower to start, but in the end it all ends up in the same place.

 

Quicker isn't always better in the early years. Understanding is what's key.

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Horizon's is much faster off the block than BJU. In fact Horizon's 2 moved on way too quickly which is why we didn't use it.

 

BJU is more steady and slower to start, but in the end it all ends up in the same place.

 

Quicker isn't always better in the early years. Understanding is what's key.

 

Do they end up in the same place? I think that was at least part of the OP's question. They very well may. I cannot speak to it since I have only used Horizons. I can say though that Horizon's pace has never seemed quick to my oldest 2 boys. Both worked through the K and the 1 book when they were five, and this was their own desire to do more than one page daily. After that, starting in the 2nd book one page a day was just about right, especially since we do many of the suggested activities in the TM to be certain we are getting that conceptual understanding through manipulatives. I feel that their mathematical understand with Horizons has always been very strong so it wasn't just them plowing through the material. I am always certain they really understand the why behind the what or I don't let them proceed. :)

 

Every child is different so the pace of BJU may be better for some and Horizons for others. I most definitely agree that understanding is what's key. If Horizons is too fast then absolutely either slow down and do 1/2 lesson each day or change programs. I disagree thought that BJU would be superior to Horizons just because they move more slowly (if that is what was implied). Again every child is different and a just right pace might be a snail's pace to another. Or a snail's pace to one might be rocket fast to yet a different child.

 

Isn't it great we have so many options! :D

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Hi Sarah,

Horizons appears to be less work for the teacher. And Horizons did seem ahead of BJU. But BJU seemed to provide more explanation in the lesson that the teacher presents. I do think that sometimes Horizons does not provide enough explanation, but I have been able to find sometime online in those few instances.

 

Hope this helps and good luck with your decision.

 

:iagree:I used BJU solely with my first son years ago for elementary because it was one of the few options. I thought it was an excellent program but was more teacher intensive. I use Horizons now with my children and like it EXCEPT for the change in authors in 4-6 grade because there was an obvious difference. Honestly, if I had only 1 or 2 children I would probably just stick with BJU. They are both good programs.

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Do they end up in the same place?

 

If BJU's math program can be judged by its pre-algebra course, it definitely is not lacking in depth and prepares a student well for algebra. The main key with any program is not how quickly or slowly it moves but that the student is able to truly understand the concepts and apply math to real life situations and not just regurgitate formulas.

 

For some Horizons may do this, for others BJU may do this.

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Hi Sherri! Thanks for the input! I think you are right about the differences (that's why I went to BJU instead - needed the explanations). Now I'm finding it difficult to read the BJU TM so I watch a Khan Academy video instead (its easier to watch a 2 min video with the toddler around). I'm also thinking it might be easier for the kids to learn somewhat independently (within reason) with Horizons than BJU.

 

Yes, Sarah, ds has been doing it mostly independently since 4 grade. I do still need to monitor his progress & do the lesson from the TM daily (which I sometimes neglect), but it's VERY brief. On good days here is what we do: Correct work from day before. I have him look at the mistakes to see if he understood where he went wrong. Lesson from TM. He does the workbook work independently (except for the problems the TM says to do with him). Usually no more than 15 minutes of my time with him for math. Of course I don't have a toddler interrupting however.

 

HTH

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Thank goodness! I am not too worried over factor trees, reducing and ratios. The CAT test also includes material not yet covered by the target age to give them the opportunity to demonstrate above-level achievement.

 

Time, measurement and money- I have been astounded at the way BJU "sneaks" in concepts in these lessons. For example, you mentioned ratios and reducing fractions- when a student has studied for years about 1/4 gallon= 1 quart and 5 millimeters = 1/2 cm, ratios and fraction reducing problems are like falling off a log.

 

I'm happy- I'm going to stick with BJU.

Edited by SnowWhite
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Do they end up in the same place? I think that was at least part of the OP's question. They very well may. I cannot speak to it since I have only used Horizons. I can say though that Horizon's pace has never seemed quick to my oldest 2 boys. Both worked through the K and the 1 book when they were five, and this was their own desire to do more than one page daily. After that, starting in the 2nd book one page a day was just about right, especially since we do many of the suggested activities in the TM to be certain we are getting that conceptual understanding through manipulatives. I feel that their mathematical understand with Horizons has always been very strong so it wasn't just them plowing through the material. I am always certain they really understand the why behind the what or I don't let them proceed. :)

 

Every child is different so the pace of BJU may be better for some and Horizons for others. I most definitely agree that understanding is what's key. If Horizons is too fast then absolutely either slow down and do 1/2 lesson each day or change programs. I disagree thought that BJU would be superior to Horizons just because they move more slowly (if that is what was implied). Again every child is different and a just right pace might be a snail's pace to another. Or a snail's pace to one might be rocket fast to yet a different child.

 

Isn't it great we have so many options! :D

 

Hmmm, good point! Well, shoot...I can't make up my mind! That pace at K & 1st in Horizons would've killed my kids (they've nearly killed me already with math:lol:) So now I'm wondering if my 10 yo would do better to STICK with BJU. The 8yo is just having fits over everything, but has shown an interest in Horizons (and maybe it matches her personality better, anyway?) My 10yo is very "slow and steady wins the race" LOL. (Wow, I'm just now realizing that my 2 girls are like the Tortoise (10yo) and the Hare (8yo)). Ok, so would it be a bad thing to spend $30 on the 5th gr workbooks just to see? I'm hoping to make this decision before the end of April because of the 20% off and free shipping on homeschoolbuyers-coop

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Thank goodness! I am not too worried over factor trees, reducing and ratios. The CAT test also includes material not yet covered by the target age to give them the opportunity to demonstrate above-level achievement.

 

Time, measurement and money- I have been astounded at the way BJU "sneaks" in concepts in these lessons. For example, you mentioned ratios and reducing fractions- when a student has studied for years about 1/4 gallon= 1 quart and 5 millimeters = 1/2 cm, ratios and fraction reducing problems are like falling off a log.

 

I'm happy- I'm going to stick with BJU.

 

I love your attitude, SnowWhite. Now all I need is for you to calmly talk me down from the ledge whenever I get this way:D

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Hmmm, good point! Well, shoot...I can't make up my mind! That pace at K & 1st in Horizons would've killed my kids (they've nearly killed me already with math:lol:) So now I'm wondering if my 10 yo would do better to STICK with BJU. The 8yo is just having fits over everything, but has shown an interest in Horizons (and maybe it matches her personality better, anyway?) My 10yo is very "slow and steady wins the race" LOL. (Wow, I'm just now realizing that my 2 girls are like the Tortoise (10yo) and the Hare (8yo)). Ok, so would it be a bad thing to spend $30 on the 5th gr workbooks just to see? I'm hoping to make this decision before the end of April because of the 20% off and free shipping on homeschoolbuyers-coop

 

Could you just get one of the workbooks to "try it on for size"? I didn't realize that you could get Horizons through the co-op! I always get mine from Rainbow Resource. Honestly the 5th grade book could definitely be done without the TM but for me I find myself pulling it out just about every single day to grade ds's work so I don't have to sit and work all the problems myself. This has been the first year I have needed/wanted to do this. In the past I liked working all the problems myself and wouldn't pull out the TM for this purpose b/c I could do most of it in my head or it just took a few minutes of computation. Now that I am schooling 2 1/2 kids I need all the shortcuts I can get. :D

 

From what others have shared it sounds like both are excellent programs, it will just depend on your desires, your dc's learning style and what they are comfortable with as well. Hope you come to a great peace about whichever path you choose!

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We love Horizons (haven't used BJU but looked at it briefly), BUT...

 

There is nothing "behind" about not doing Pre-Algebra until 8th grade. A lot of kids aren't ready for it in 7th. If they are, great, but if not--pushing to "catch up" isn't going to help.

 

I really think that if what you have is working well for your teaching style and your daughter's learning style, that I wouldn't change to something you have tried in the past but didn't work for you. (Don't fix what's not broken!) If what you have now is NOT working as well as you'd like, then look around at a variety of things before choosing.

 

You mentioned in a later post about learning independently--this can work well in Horizons levels 4-6, because in those levels the instruction is written to the student in the workbooks. However, as I tell my children, kids won't know how to do the lesson if they don't read all that, LOL! Often when they come to me with questions, it's because they tried not reading it, and then we end up reading it together and going over examples together--but I expect that & think that's what teacher's do, so I don't mind when that happens.

 

The lengthy BJU TM is what kept me from using BJU when I looked at it briefly--but I did not really need the explanations and felt comfortable explaining topics myself or with base 10 blocks etc... when my kids were little.

 

Have you ever looked at something like Math-U-See that has the teaching DVD? My son is going through their Pre-Algebra course right now, and it only takes about 5 minutes a week to watch the teaching segment--I do this with him and it makes it easy for me to know how to go over the concept if he hits a snag when doing his work. It's mastery-based, so you really get a sense of doing a topic until you know it, but it also includes ongoing review so that previously learned concepts are not lost.

 

I'm wondering, with that feeling of "spinning out of control" that you had with all of the topics in Horizons, if you wouldn't feel more comfortable with a mastery-based program. I used to think that mastery-based meant they didn't do ongoing review--and was pleasantly surprised to learn that's not what it necessarily is (at least not with MUS). I don't recall if BJU is mastery-based, but if it is, that may be one reason why it feels so different from Horizons.

 

HTH some! Merry :-)

Edited by MerryAtHope
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I don't recall if BJU is mastery-based, but if it is, that may be one reason why it feels so different from Horizons.

:-)

 

BJU is mastery based. Concepts go by chapter and they come back again building on previous chapters especially in multiplication, division, addition, etc., with review concepts at the bottom of the back page. Horizon is spiral.

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My ds used Horizons Math up to about 1/4 of the way through Horizons 3. Then I used BJU Math 3 (the newest edition, w/o the DVD's) and then on to BJU Math 4 and 5 with the DVD's. I had NO idea just how painful this would be for my ds. He LOVED Horizons and he has battled me all the way through with BJU Math for some reason. He has constantly wished to go back to Horizons.

 

Looking back on things now, I am still not sure if I did the right thing or not in switching him. He is a dc who HATES manipulatives and rarely learns anything from them. He LOVED that he was doing pre-algebra stuff in Horizons 3, and he understand the concepts. What he wasn't getting enough of in Horizons was the drilling of multiplication facts and recognizing math terminology and understanding why the formulas were working for him. And yet I do think he picked up quickly on the concept of finding the missing addends in Horizons. BJU seemed to make it more complicated for him, but BJU really made him go through a lot of word problems to really cement the concepts in 4th grade (and he did not like having to do all that work!!!)

 

Basically, he could finish his Horizons Math a lot faster and that is probably what he liked best about it (plus the feeling that he was smarter than his neighbor who is 2 years older than he is and yet had no idea what pre-algebra even was!!)

 

In retrospect, I think I probably should've stayed with Horizons with this particular dc. However, he has begrudgingly learned a whole lot with BJU Math. I guess he would've had troubles with memorizing his times tables no matter which math we had used.

 

I can see now that it really is best (if possible) to find out early which math curriculum is best suited to each dc (and you as their teacher) and then just stick with it! One thing to keep in mind, though, is that Horizons Math only through 6th grade and then you have to pick something different (I believe).

 

The part I like best about BJU Math is that they spend an entire chapter on one particular topic, with a bit of review at the beginning of the lesson of some concept from an earlier chapter... so it is more of a mastery program, and I guess that is the type of program that matches my learning/teaching style the most. I never really cared for manipulatives in math, either. However, I must say that I am learning a lot of the why's of math now with BJU 5th grade that I never really picked up on all the way through my own math career (and I was a straight A student with math being my favorite subject). :tongue_smilie:

 

Blessings in whichever of these 2 great math programs you choose!

 

Brenda

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If you follow the TM in Horizons, there is lots and lots of flashcard work with multiplication facts starting in second grade. People who don't use the TM with Horizons often complain about there not being enough drill with math facts including addition and subtraction, though it is definitely there! Just be sure not to skip the important excercises in the TM is you use Horizons.

 

For my children who have the potential to go into a math or science field, I would want to try to get them into prealgebra in 7th grade so that they could take algebra in 8th. If you plan to do algebra no sooner than 9th grade, this would work well for children who are not math-oriented, but it could put the math-types behind in high school if they wanted to get to advanced calculus by 12th grade (or else they would have to combine two years of math into one in order to catch up).

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Thanks for advice! I ordered Horizons 3rd gr book 1 (for 8yo) and 5th book 1 (for 10yo), just to try it out. The 10yo looked at samples with me yesterday and liked the Horizons format, but she wants me to order the BJU 5th gr *just in case* she wants to switch back.

 

Math facts: my biggest downfall was not covering math facts with the kids. That's reason #1 that we are all so behind. We're catching up by doing some separate drill every day, and have been finding what works (mathfactcafe.com, love that site!) The 10yo almost has all of her multiplication facts through 9 memorized:)

 

Plans: we'd like to start dd in college early (aiming for 15-16), so that is one thing to consider. She likes this idea of getting a college degree early and I think she will be of the mature mind to handle it (and we may just do an online college from home, anyway). Just need to make sure the skills are there. She doesn't know what field she wants to go in yet, but if I could guess I'd say computer science is a possibility. We also joke that she'd make a good lawyer, but I don't think this is out of the question for her, either. Or, maybe she'll just be a good homemaker and homeschool mother - but we'd like to give her the tools to pursue her goals, whatever the case.

 

I'm not sure I'd stick with BJU at the 7th gr level and beyond anyway. Every time I see all of the text directed at the student and the format change in the samples, I sort of freak. Horizons new 7th gr pre-alg book looks like it is less wordy, which I might like better at that level.

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I'm not sure I'd stick with BJU at the 7th gr level and beyond anyway. Every time I see all of the text directed at the student and the format change in the samples, I sort of freak. Horizons new 7th gr pre-alg book looks like it is less wordy, which I might like better at that level.

 

The 7th and 8th grade BJU has been really good. Having the text directed at the student is a good thing at that level.

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If you follow the TM in Horizons, there is lots and lots of flashcard work with multiplication facts starting in second grade. People who don't use the TM with Horizons often complain about there not being enough drill with math facts including addition and subtraction, though it is definitely there! Just be sure not to skip the important excercises in the TM is you use Horizons.

 

:iagree: Yep, this is so very true. :)

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I have used Horizons with both of my boys from level 1 to 6 (we skipped K, and by 6 my eldest was just doing the exams and a few worksheets, not the workbook assignments or exams. Not sure yet how far youngest will go, he’s now doing just the tests in level 4 after doing levels 4 and 5 on aleks)

 

We have gone at their pace throughout, typically crossing out some problems when they show they have mastered a concept, and adding in worksheets only occasionally when a concept needed more practice. I have added in various things to supplement over the years as well….

 

Tons of manipulatives (including cuisinaire rods, fraction towers, pattern blocks, base 10 blocks, Hands-On Equations, and more)

Right start card games

Online facts drills, primarily multiplication

EPGY math online for (one year for my eldest during Hor 5 and 6)

Life of Fred Fractions and Decimals/Percents (during Hor 4 and 5)

And most recently, a few months of aleks for both, and khanacademy for my eldest.

 

My eldest has always enjoyed math, done a lot of work independently, and scored extremely well on math competitions. He also recently qualified for a very selective high school/college math program, so with that outside confirmation, I think I can safely say that Horizons has served him very well.

 

My younger has a love/hate relationship with math. He is also very good at math but takes a more creative bent, which honestly drives me crazy sometimes!! He has needed more “discussion†than his older brother. (my instruction tends to take the form of discussing rather than lecture type teaching). But still our methods have worked well for him and he is succeeding in math.

 

The only time I wouldn’t recommend Horizons is when a parent is not confident in her own math ability or her ability to communicate about math concepts. It doesn’t hold your hand or give you a script. If you need that, Horizons isn’t for you.

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