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still working on my modern history through books and film, weak in the 1980's to now.


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This is what I have so far, comments welcome.

I am really weak in the 1980's to now in books and films that capture the decades and would love ideas.

Summer Reading prior to course:

 

Oxford History of the US, Grand Expectations, 1945-1974, James Patterson 829 pgs

 

Oxford History of the US, Restless Giant, James Patterson 496 pgs

 

World War I

 

Read:

World War I, Richard Maybury 252 pgs

The Guns of August, Barbara Tuchman 544pgs

 

Watch:

The Sinking of the Lusitania

The First World War, The Complete Series 10 episodes

World War I in Color (6 episodes)

All Quiet on the Western Front

A Night to Remember

Sergeant York

Gallipoli

Lawrence of Arabia

 

Post WWI

Read:

Letters from Rifka 176 pgs

Animal Farm 128 pgs

History of the Russian Revolution, Leon Trotsky 1040 pgs

or Ten Days that Shook the World, John Reed 368 pgs

 

Watch:

Russian Revolution in Color 94 minutes

Italian Fascism in Color 100 minutes

Reds 194 minutes

 

1920's - 1930's

Read:

Where the Red Fern Grows, Wilson Rawls 208 pgs

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald 180 pgs

 

Watch:

Inherit the Wind

Chariots of Fire

The Grapes of Wrath

Of Mice and Men

The Hindenberg

The War of the Worlds Scandal

Public Enemies

The Education of Little Tree

The Johnstown Flood

American Experience: Hurricane of "38"

Sounder

 

World War II

Read:

World War II, Richard Maybury 349 pgs

The Second World War, Winston Churchill 384 pgs

The Hiding Place, Corrie Ten Boom 221 pgs

 

Watch:

Churchill, The Gathering Storm

Hitler: The Rise of Evil

World at War 26 hours

World War II in HD 10 episodes

Battle of the Atlantic

Defiance

Das Boot

Sink the Bismark

Schindler's List

Tora! Tora! Tora!

Auschwitz: Inside the Nazi State (?) 6 episodes

The Thin Red Line

Stalingrad

Enemy at the Gates

Casablanca

Bataan!

The Longest Day (compare and contrast with Saving Private Ryan)

Battle of the Bulge

Truman: American Experience

Hiroshima: BBC History of WWII 89 minutes

Judgement at Nuremberg

 

1940's

Read: Kon Tiki 272 pgs and watch on YouTube 58 minutes

On the Road, Jack Kerouac 304 pgs

 

Watch:

A Paralyzing Fear

The Legend of Pancho Barnes

Modern Marvels: Mount Rushmore

Six Days in June

CNN: Cold War

The Atomic Cafe/The Day After

Trinity and Beyond

China: A Century of Revolution

Berlin Airlift: American Experience

 

Korean War

MASH

Tae Guk Gi: The Brotherhood of War

Korea, The Forgotten War

Korean War in Color

Grand Torino

 

1950's and 1960's

Read:

Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger 288 pgs

 

Watch:

Thirteen Days

Apollo 13

Go Tell the Spartans

We Were Soldiers

Rebel without a Cause

Good Morning Vietnam

Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman

Malcolm X

La Bamba

Easy Rider

The Killing Fields

The Outsiders

Rachel Carson's Silent Spring

Hair

American Graffiti

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner

Forest Gump

First Blood

 

1970's

Read:

The Ruins of California , Martha Sherrill 384 pgs

When the White House was Ours, Porter Shreve 280 pgs

Jaws, Peter Benchley (?)

 

Watch:

Roe Vs. Wade

American Gangster

Dazed and Confused

Raid on Entebbe

American Experience: A Class Apart

Let Freedom Sing

Cry Freedom

Munich

Kennedy

RFK

All the Presidents Men

444 Days to Freedom

American Experience: Jimmy Carter

Saturday Night Fever (pg version)

The Bronx is Burning (?)

Nadia

1980's

Read:

When Character was King, Peggy Noonan 352 pgs

The Official Preppy Handbook 224 pgs

 

In Those Years

In those years, people will say, we lost track

of the meaning of we,of you

we found ourselves

reduced to I

and the whole thing

became silly, ironic, terrible:

we were trying to live a personal life

and yes, that was the only life

we could bear witness to

 

But the great dark birds of history screamed and plunged

into our personal weather

They were headed somewhere else but their beaks and pinions drove

along the shore, through the rags of fog

where we stood, saying I.

~ Adrienne Rich ~

Published in 1991, but surely speaks to the 1980s generation

 

Watch:

Pretty in Pink

American Experience: Reagan

Miracle

The Wall: A World Divided

Tankman, Frontline

Pirates of Silicon Valley

Live from Baghdad

Bravo Two Zero

Desert Triumph

Inside Shock and Awe

21 Days to Baghdad

Charlie Wilson's War

 

1990's

Read:

Microserfs, Douglas Copeland (?)

 

Watch:

The Special Relationship: Blair/Clinton

Ghosts of Rwanda

Hotel Rwanda

Oklahoma City Bombing

Bang Bang You're Dead (Columbine)

Blood Diamond

2000's

Read:

Empire Falls, Richard Russo

 

Watch:

The Social Network

Restrepo

Engineering Disasters: New Orleans

7 Days in September

9/11

Obsession: Radical Islam's War Against the West

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I think recent history is hard because it's still going on. A couple of things from the 1990s come to mind.

 

One is how Disney VHS movies became the new thing for my kids. My dd must have watched Lion King a meeeellllion times :)

 

Another would be computers, of course. I wonder how the movie Pirates of Silicon Valley is? I haven't watched it, but something like that might be relevant.

 

Maybe something about the changing roles of women/mothers in the 80s to today? I mean women in my family have always worked, but I saw the "expectation" change in my lifetime. The problem is that if you just show a movie with a woman in a new role (like GI Jane, Norma Rae, Kramer vs. Kramer, 9 to 5), your child will see that as normal today?

 

Just random thoughts,

Julie

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This is what I have so far, comments welcome.

I am really weak in the 1980's to now in books and films that capture the decades and would love ideas.

Summer Reading prior to course:

 

Oxford History of the US, Grand Expectations, 1945-1974, James Patterson 829 pgs

 

Oxford History of the US, Restless Giant, James Patterson 496 pgs

 

World War I

 

Read:

World War I, Richard Maybury 252 pgs

The Guns of August, Barbara Tuchman 544pgs

 

Watch:

The Sinking of the Lusitania

The First World War, The Complete Series 10 episodes

World War I in Color (6 episodes)

All Quiet on the Western Front

A Night to Remember

Sergeant York

Gallipoli

Lawrence of Arabia

 

If you can find a copy of The Lighthorsemen, it is excellent. The movie about Hemingway with Sandra Bullock was also really well done.

 

Post WWI

Read:

Letters from Rifka 176 pgs

Animal Farm 128 pgs

History of the Russian Revolution, Leon Trotsky 1040 pgs

or Ten Days that Shook the World, John Reed 368 pgs

 

Watch:

Russian Revolution in Color 94 minutes

Italian Fascism in Color 100 minutes

Reds 194 minutes

 

1920's - 1930's

Read:

Where the Red Fern Grows, Wilson Rawls 208 pgs

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald 180 pgs

 

Watch:

Inherit the Wind

Chariots of Fire

The Grapes of Wrath

Of Mice and Men

The Hindenberg

The War of the Worlds Scandal

Public Enemies

The Education of Little Tree

The Johnstown Flood

American Experience: Hurricane of "38"

Sounder

 

World War II

Read:

World War II, Richard Maybury 349 pgs

The Second World War, Winston Churchill 384 pgs

The Hiding Place, Corrie Ten Boom 221 pgs

The books by Stephen Ambrose are well done, cover a lot of history and are very readable. Citizen Solders is quite good. Pegasus Bridge is a tight book about one particular event (which is featured as part of The Longest Day). The Kaine Mutiney is a great book (which is only half covered in the movie).

 

Watch:

Churchill, The Gathering Storm

Hitler: The Rise of Evil

World at War 26 hours

World War II in HD 10 episodes

Battle of the Atlantic

Defiance

Das Boot

Sink the Bismark

Schindler's List

Tora! Tora! Tora!

Auschwitz: Inside the Nazi State (?) 6 episodes

The Thin Red Line

Stalingrad

Enemy at the Gates

Casablanca

Bataan!

The Longest Day (compare and contrast with Saving Private Ryan)

Battle of the Bulge

Truman: American Experience

Hiroshima: BBC History of WWII 89 minutes

Judgement at Nuremberg

 

Band of Brothers, Victory at Sea, The Pacific, Away All Boats, Enemy Below, Mr. Roberts, Conspiracy (we showed this to guests before taking them to see any of the camps in Germany near where we lived), The Cruel Sea

 

1940's

Read: Kon Tiki 272 pgs and watch on YouTube 58 minutes

On the Road, Jack Kerouac 304 pgs

The Road to Memphis (maybe not rhetoric level, but it caught me in the gut). Look at the books of Leon Uris, especially QB VII and Armagedon.

 

Watch:

A Paralyzing Fear

The Legend of Pancho Barnes

Modern Marvels: Mount Rushmore

Six Days in June

CNN: Cold War

The Atomic Cafe/The Day After

Trinity and Beyond

China: A Century of Revolution

Berlin Airlift: American Experience

 

QB VII (I haven't previewed this)

Fail-Safe

The Third Man (this might be slightly later)

 

Korean War

MASH

Tae Guk Gi: The Brotherhood of War

Korea, The Forgotten War

Korean War in Color

Grand Torino

 

The Bridges of Toko-Ri

 

1950's and 1960's

Read:

Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger 288 pgs

 

We Were Soldiers Once ... And Young, Once a Warrior King, The Right Stuff, A Cambodian Odyssey/Survival in the Killing Fields (I think this is the same book) about Haing Ngor, who played in The Killing Fields. His own story is as incredible as the role he played in the movie. Red Scarf Girl.

 

Watch:

Thirteen Days

Apollo 13

Go Tell the Spartans

We Were Soldiers

Rebel without a Cause

Good Morning Vietnam

Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman

Malcolm X

La Bamba

Easy Rider

The Killing Fields

The Outsiders

Rachel Carson's Silent Spring

Hair

American Graffiti

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner

Forest Gump

First Blood

I think that Mad Men captures this decade really well. I'll Fly Away with Sam Waterston was good, but doesn't seem to have been put onto DVD.

 

1970's

Read:

The Ruins of California , Martha Sherrill 384 pgs

When the White House was Ours, Porter Shreve 280 pgs

Jaws, Peter Benchley (?)

 

Watch:

Roe Vs. Wade

American Gangster

Dazed and Confused

Raid on Entebbe

American Experience: A Class Apart

Let Freedom Sing

Cry Freedom

Munich

Kennedy

RFK

All the Presidents Men

444 Days to Freedom

American Experience: Jimmy Carter

Saturday Night Fever (pg version)

The Bronx is Burning (?)

Nadia

The Tunnel (NB: One sex scene to possibly skip through and a suicide attempt. Set in the 1960s, but I think that it fits the whole Cold War feel of the 1970s well.)

 

1980's

Read:

When Character was King, Peggy Noonan 352 pgs

The Official Preppy Handbook 224 pgs

Grey is the Color of Hope by Irina Ratushinskaya or In the Beginning (both are about her time as a Samizdat poet and Soviet political prisoner)

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (I think this is set earlier, and was published in 1976, but certainly conveys what was going on in the Soviet Union. The First Circle might be another title to look at.) Inside the Danger Zone - about the naval engagements in the last 1980s. Some of David Poyer's novels convey this period well (The Gulf would be a good start.). The Ambassador's Wife (set late 1970s in Iran). Hunt for Red October

 

In Those Years

In those years, people will say, we lost track

of the meaning of we,of you

we found ourselves

reduced to I

and the whole thing

became silly, ironic, terrible:

we were trying to live a personal life

and yes, that was the only life

we could bear witness to

 

But the great dark birds of history screamed and plunged

into our personal weather

They were headed somewhere else but their beaks and pinions drove

along the shore, through the rags of fog

where we stood, saying I.

~ Adrienne Rich ~

Published in 1991, but surely speaks to the 1980s generation

 

Watch:

Pretty in Pink

American Experience: Reagan

Miracle

The Wall: A World Divided

Tankman, Frontline

Pirates of Silicon Valley

Live from Baghdad

Bravo Two Zero

Desert Triumph

Inside Shock and Awe

21 Days to Baghdad

Charlie Wilson's War

 

TOP GUN Best Navy Recruiting film of the decade. I think half my class wanted to go Navy Air because of this movie.

Hunt for Red October

I think there are some movie versions of terrorist air highjackings.

1990's

Read:

Microserfs, Douglas Copeland (?)

 

Watch:

The Special Relationship: Blair/Clinton

Ghosts of Rwanda

Hotel Rwanda

Oklahoma City Bombing

Bang Bang You're Dead (Columbine)

Blood Diamond

You might want to move your Desert Storm movies to here. Bright Lights Big City, Greed,

Goodbye Lenin, The Lives of Others (both have a couple s*x scenes. The Lives of Others is incredibly accurate, but therefore brutal in the life it depicts)

 

2000's

Read:

Empire Falls, Richard Russo

 

Watch:

The Social Network

Restrepo

Engineering Disasters: New Orleans

7 Days in September

9/11

Obsession: Radical Islam's War Against the West

 

This might sound odd, but a few episodes of Army Wives might be in order. I'm not an avid watcher, but have seen several episodes. It does a very good job of conveying the life of military families in a period of ongoing deployments and risk. For my family, this has been the defining characteristic of the decade.

 

Nice list you started with.

I tried to add a few here and there. I'm not sure that I've quite hit on the defining moments of the decades. I'm sure this will brew in the back of my head. I'll post others as I think of them.

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For the 1980s, I would consider adding "War Games" (which I think does a good job of capturing the fears of the Cold War in an entertaining way), "Ghostbusters" (which taps into the consumerism and media madness of the 1980s) and "Working Girl" (which is an interesting look at both classism and feminism and the ways they were changing during the 1980s).

Depending on how comfortable you are with the themes and subject matter, I think Tom Wolfe's Bonfire of the Vanities would be a great read for that time period. (But stay away from the movie -- it stinks!)

 

For the 1990s, I think "Pulp Fiction" really captures the zeitgeist of the era, complete with cartoon-like graphic violence, a sense of apathetic rebellion and re-imagined cultural mores -- but there are obviously some questionable bits content-wise. And maybe read Primary Colors -- a really interesting look at how weird politics was becoming during that time. And maybe Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash, which captures how important technology was becoming? Again, they're adult books, so you'd want to check them out first to make sure they fit your family.

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For the 1990s, I think "Pulp Fiction" really captures the zeitgeist of the era, complete with cartoon-like graphic violence, a sense of apathetic rebellion and re-imagined cultural mores -- but there are obviously some questionable bits content-wise. And maybe read Primary Colors -- a really interesting look at how weird politics was becoming during that time. And maybe Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash, which captures how important technology was becoming? Again, they're adult books, so you'd want to check them out first to make sure they fit your family.

 

Funny, I just finished Snow Crash this week. Interesting book. He has quite the turn of phrase. Though it seemed more like the book stopped rather than concluded. Oh well.

 

I really hated the movie Pulp Fiction and never managed to get through it even once.

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I am not a Neal Stephenson fan for that very reason -- I never feel satisfied after finishing one of his books. I always feel like someone stole the last chapter before I checked it out!

I loved Pulp Fiction when I saw it as a teenager, but I tried watching it again as an adult a few years ago and the experience was really different. I think it's an important movie, though -- and very 90s!

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I love this idea, but I would move some movies into the reading column (e.g., Of Mice and Men and The Grapes of Wrath).

 

Since this is looking at visual media, why don't you include photography? Movies are powerful moving images, and images are powerful still.

 

Also, how about the documentary The Day After Peace? It's about one man's quest to have just one day in the year that has no fighting anywhere in the world. It came out in 2008 but covers (I believe) a ten-year period. It is very powerful.

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I love this idea, but I would move some movies into the reading column (e.g., Of Mice and Men and The Grapes of Wrath).

Since this is looking at visual media, why don't you include photography? Movies are powerful moving images, and images are powerful still.

Also, how about the documentary The Day After Peace? It's about one man's quest to have just one day in the year that has no fighting anywhere in the world. It came out in 2008 but covers (I believe) a ten-year period. It is very powerful.

 

Normally I would agree, but this year was ancient history and lit and she slogged through a lot of heavy reading, all of Omnibus I primary and secondary in addition to an honors ancient history credit where I added in even more reading. ( I really didn't think Omnibus had enough overall history to count as a full credit) She will also be earning credit working at Old Sturbridge Village as a junior intern so I am trying to balance out her time.

I am still gathering resources and we just can't read everything, though I wish we could, but I didn't want to miss those two in at least some form.

 

She will also be doing an Art of the Western World course which does include photography. Good idea.

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You have many wonderful resources already listed.

 

I would add Band of Brothers (WWII) - absolutely superlative, both the book and the HBO miniseries.

 

I have to sadly disagree with recommending The Pacific, even though it was done by the same producers (Steven Spielberg/Tom Hanks) as Band of Brothers. They seem to have gone out of their way to be raunchy and offensive. There is some swearing, s*x, and tons of violence in Band of Brothers - but it is not gratuitous. I cannot say the same for The Pacific. (And I am very "liberal" about movies.)

 

I just finished a recently written book called Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand (sp). It covers the war in the Pacific during WWII, but from the perspective of one man. Absolutely marvelous. Although graphic and terrible throughout, it somehow never gets gratuitous. I would recommend it to any adults as well . . . a truly inspirational true story.

 

And lastly, I vividly remember watching The Killing Fields when I myself was in high school in the mid 80's. It was a devestating movie, but the best one that captured the horrors of the Vietnam War. I think it's probably an R movie . . . you might want to prescreen this one.

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One thing to remember: Though MASH was set in the Korean War, it was really more about Vietnam. Just consider how long the show lasted vs. the war it was supposedly portraying.

 

For the 1980's, I'd add Wall Street (the original; the sequel might make a good recent-history follow up).

 

I would include Rachel Carson's book Silent Spring in the 1960's; it's not a difficult read, and at least one true story drama related to the environmental movement: A Civil Action or Erin Brockovitch would be good ones.

 

Sample episodes of TV shows from each decade since it came along might be good, too; Many old shows can be found on Netflix.

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1990's

Read:

Microserfs, Douglas Copeland (?)

 

Watch:

The Special Relationship: Blair/Clinton

Ghosts of Rwanda

Hotel Rwanda

Oklahoma City Bombing

Bang Bang You're Dead (Columbine)

Blood Diamond

 

 

Instead of Hotel Rwanda I would really recommend reading Paul Rusesabagina's autobiography An Ordinary Man.

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Das But = WWII, following orders/patriotism and ideology

Valkyrie WWII, same thing

Defiance= WWII,

 

Persepolis, graphic novel and graphic movie, about the Iranian fundamentalist take over in the 70's. Very intense

 

2nding Killing Fields re: Cambodian in the 70's

 

Did you get Walter Marrins' books? Hitler, Stalin, Veitnam, etc.

 

Fantastic list. I am rethinking next yr's history for my Jr. now! ;)

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that I had forgotten how much n*dity there was in Schindler's List. We finished out our study of WWII watching it and ds looked away a lot. :glare:

 

I agree with another poster's assessment of The Pacific--not worth the time; very glad I watched an episode or two before wasting his time.

 

I was very moved watching Life is Beautiful at the time it came out, but not so much this time. We didn't watch it, as we had the concentration camp experience pretty much covered with other things.

 

You might add Exodus. The movie isn't quite as good as the history interwoven into the book's fictional plotline, but there are only so many hours, you know? We found Abba Eban's short history of Israel pretty compelling (on netflix), lots of newsreel footage; it tied nicely to other work we had done.

 

hth

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that I had forgotten how much n*dity there was in Schindler's List. We finished out our study of WWII watching it and ds looked away a lot. :glare:

 

I agree with another poster's assessment of The Pacific--not worth the time; very glad I watched an episode or two before wasting his time.

 

I was very moved watching Life is Beautiful at the time it came out, but not so much this time. We didn't watch it, as we had the concentration camp experience pretty much covered with other things.

 

You might add Exodus. The movie isn't quite as good as the history interwoven into the book's fictional plotline, but there are only so many hours, you know? We found Abba Eban's short history of Israel pretty compelling (on netflix), lots of newsreel footage; it tied nicely to other work we had done.

 

hth

 

I have to confess that while I've seen all of Band of Brothers, I based the suggestion of The Pacific on the couple episodes dh watched. And he was watching it with a bunch of other professional military officers serving in the same area of operation.

 

I also have reservations about some of the movies as rather gritty or containing scenes that some families aren't comfortable with. But the original list was rather inclusive on this score. YMMV.

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I have to confess that while I've seen all of Band of Brothers, I based the suggestion of The Pacific on the couple episodes dh watched. And he was watching it with a bunch of other professional military officers serving in the same area of operation.

 

I also have reservations about some of the movies as rather gritty or containing scenes that some families aren't comfortable with. But the original list was rather inclusive on this score. YMMV.

 

I hear what you're saying . . . I wasn't trying to be argumentative, just to share (sadly) my opinion that the Pacific wasn't nearly as good as Band of Brothers. I still learned a lot about the WWII in the Pacific, and that was good . . . but it truly seemed to go out of its way to be graphic/raunchy/shocking at times. Many times, in fact. One time I joked with my DH that they were going to show men going to the bathroom next episode, just to keep it "real". And darn if they didn't do just that. :001_huh:

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I hear what you're saying . . . I wasn't trying to be argumentative, just to share (sadly) my opinion that the Pacific wasn't nearly as good as Band of Brothers. I still learned a lot about the WWII in the Pacific, and that was good . . . but it truly seemed to go out of its way to be graphic/raunchy/shocking at times. Many times, in fact. One time I joked with my DH that they were going to show men going to the bathroom next episode, just to keep it "real". And darn if they didn't do just that. :001_huh:

 

Oh, I didn't think you were arguementative. As I mentioned I haven't watched that one myself.

 

Oh, how about Letters from Iwo Jima paired with Flags of our Fathers and/or Sands of Iwo Jima.

 

Am I just forgetting a lot of movies? I'm having trouble coming up with any set in the Pacific with a good punch that aren't also selling a political statement. Hmm. I'll have to keep thinking.

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Oh, I didn't think you were arguementative. As I mentioned I haven't watched that one myself.

 

Oh, how about Letters from Iwo Jima paired with Flags of our Fathers and/or Sands of Iwo Jima.

 

Am I just forgetting a lot of movies? I'm having trouble coming up with any set in the Pacific with a good punch that aren't also selling a political statement. Hmm. I'll have to keep thinking.

 

Okay, this has nothing to do with the thread, but we went to a talk by a guy from my city who was one of the original flag raisers on Iwo Jima and he wasn't in the famous photo (or the film about that photo) because the second flag raisers had a better photo :)

http://www.mdva.state.mn.us/extras/CharlesLindberg.htm

 

Julie

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Agree about reading Exodus by Leon Uris. It's great historical fiction, old enough not to be too dirty, and covers the history and founding of the modern state of Israel. Very well-written.

 

Got to cover feminism. My suggestions:

"The Feminine Mystique" by Betty Friedan--absolutely indespensible.

"Click" This one is an article. It must be on the internet; it's very famous.

"The Women's Room" -- This one is a novel set shortly after the women's movement got off the ground. It covers academia, the connection between the women's movement and the anti Vietnam war movement, and suburbia.

The autobiographies of Judy Chicago--the rediscovery of women's history

"The Hearts of Men" by Barbara Ehrenreich--the early male roots of the women's movement

"Sex and Power" by Susan Estrich--later period, interesting reflections on politics and women

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  • 1 year later...
Agree about reading Exodus by Leon Uris. It's great historical fiction, old enough not to be too dirty, and covers the history and founding of the modern state of Israel. Very well-written.

 

Got to cover feminism. My suggestions:

"The Feminine Mystique" by Betty Friedan--absolutely indespensible.

"Click" This one is an article. It must be on the internet; it's very famous.

"The Women's Room" -- This one is a novel set shortly after the women's movement got off the ground. It covers academia, the connection between the women's movement and the anti Vietnam war movement, and suburbia.

The autobiographies of Judy Chicago--the rediscovery of women's history

"The Hearts of Men" by Barbara Ehrenreich--the early male roots of the women's movement

"Sex and Power" by Susan Estrich--later period, interesting reflections on politics and women

 

Nice additions. I would also consider adding some of the more influential works on race identity. Things like Blues People by LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka)

 

But maybe a general film like Berkeley in the Sixties?

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Nice additions. I would also consider adding some of the more influential works on race identity. Things like Blues People by LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka)

 

But maybe a general film like Berkeley in the Sixties?

 

For racial identity, consider:

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

In Search of My Mother's Garden and The Color Purple by Alice Walker

Ishii, Last of His Tribe by Theodore Kroeber

Ohitika Woman

Fifth Chinese Daughter by Jade Snow Wong

One of the novels of Amy Tan

 

 

For the Berkeley thing, "The Berkeley Student Revolt" is outstanding. It is a collection of original source material from the Free Speech Movement, and in many ways this foreshadows all of the issues of the Vietnam war protest era later on. I read it on my own when I was in college, and it gave me food for thought for a lifetime, literally. This is because I believe in standing up for what is right, and in taking risks in the pursuit thereof. But, although the movement seemed righteous at first, it was not at the end. And the transition is difficult to see. Exactly where does it shift into foolishness, into actual evil? And how do you see that? And if you do, do you still follow your leader who has made sacrifices for this? Where does your conscience compel you to make a change of direction, and how do you convey that in a loving and firm way? The reflections on this made this one of the three most influential books I read during my college years, even though it was not for a class. (The other two were "That Hideous Strength" by C. S. Lewis and "Disciple" by Juan Carlos Ortiz. "Passages" and "The Feminine Mystique" were very influential as well, but not as lastingly so.)

Edited by Carol in Cal.
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WOW WOW!!!! This is the best thread ever!!! I have been racking my brain, trying to come up with something to use to explain modern history to our kids, and needing something quite visually oriented for 3 of ours who are ELL kids. This would allow me to combine learning for all of them! THANK YOU to all for your great suggestions and links. I am printing it as I type and going to use it for high school with a tweak here or there for our needs. This was just what I had hoped to find!

 

Cindy

 

Who is bowing down to the Hive in complete admiration :D

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For racial identity, consider:

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

In Search of My Mother's Garden and The Color Purple by Alice Walker

Ishii, Last of His Tribe by Theodore Kroeber

Ohitika Woman

Fifth Chinese Daughter by Jade Snow Wong

One of the novels of Amy Tan

 

 

For the Berkeley thing, "The Berkeley Student Revolt" is outstanding. It is a collection of original source material from the Free Speech Movement, and in many ways this foreshadows all of the issues of the Vietnam war protest era later on. I read it on my own when I was in college, and it gave me food for thought for a lifetime, literally. This is because I believe in standing up for what is right, and in taking risks in the pursuit thereof. But, although the movement seemed righteous at first, it was not at the end. And the transition is difficult to see. Exactly where does it shift into foolishness, into actual evil? And how do you see that? And if you do, do you still follow your leader who has made sacrifices for this? Where does your conscience compel you to make a change of direction, and how do you convey that in a loving and firm way? The reflections on this made this one of the three most influential books I read during my college years, even though it was not for a class. (The other two were "That Hideous Strength" by C. S. Lewis and "Disciple" by Juan Carlos Ortiz. "Passages" and "The Feminine Mystique" were very influential as well, but not as lastingly so.)

 

Fabulous stuff, and important readings. Can you think of any films or television productions of similar quality/content? I'm drawing a big blank. Other than Quantum Leap. ;) Actually, maybe Quantum Leap wouldn't be so bad. I need to think about that now...

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Fabulous stuff, and important readings. Can you think of any films or television productions of similar quality/content? I'm drawing a big blank. Other than Quantum Leap. ;) Actually, maybe Quantum Leap wouldn't be so bad. I need to think about that now...

 

Dances with Wolves

Any August Wilson play. My personal favorite is Fences

The movie version of The Color Purple

The movie version of The Joy Luck Club

Tootsie (for gender issues)

 

Also, going back to the OP's hope for recommendations from the 80's to now, if there are youtube videos of the following, they would capture the era to some extent:

Ronald Reagan's 'Tear Down This Wall' speech in Berlin

The Beethoven's Ninth Symphony performance at the site of the former Berlin wall for New Year's 1990

Footage from the 9/11 attacks, and the one year later PBS special on them

President Bush (junior)'s speech at the National Cathedral service commemorating 9/11, a week or two afterwards

Footage from the explosion of the Challenger space shuttle

President Bill Clinton's first inaugueral address and first SOTU address

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Dances with Wolves

Any August Wilson play. My personal favorite is Fences

The movie version of The Color Purple

The movie version of The Joy Luck Club

Tootsie (for gender issues)

 

Also, going back to the OP's hope for recommendations from the 80's to now, if there are youtube videos of the following, they would capture the era to some extent:

Ronald Reagan's 'Tear Down This Wall' speech in Berlin

The Beethoven's Ninth Symphony performance at the site of the former Berlin wall for New Year's 1990

Footage from the 9/11 attacks, and the one year later PBS special on them

President Bush (junior)'s speech at the National Cathedral service commemorating 9/11, a week or two afterwards

Footage from the explosion of the Challenger space shuttle

President Bill Clinton's first inaugueral address and first SOTU address

 

For September 11th, I like the movie 9/11 by the Naudet brothers.

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  • 5 months later...

I'm bumping this thread for anyone looking to plan modern history, lots of great resources. Lizzie, how did your study turn out? I'm curious now.

 

Thank you for bumping this! I had the link saved, and when the board switched over and the old links weren't working, I deleted it. Then they got the old links working again, and I have been wanting this back ever since. :001_smile:

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The one gap I see in film is that you don't appear to have many films from the actual time period you are studying.

 

City Lights

The Jazz Singer

The Maltese Falcon

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

Citizen Cane.

Gone with the Wind

etc

 

The sad part about not doing this is that the golden age of films is not after the 60s but before which means you are missing a bunch of amazing films.

 

While it is all well and good to watch movies based on depression era novels, it is important to have watched movies that were made then which are lush. What does that mean.

 

To help you might find a used text on movie history. But on the cheap and quick even Wikipedia has an article on film history: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_film

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The one gap I see in film is that you don't appear to have many films from the actual time period you are studying.

 

City Lights

The Jazz Singer

The Maltese Falcon

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

Citizen Cane.

Gone with the Wind

etc

 

The sad part about not doing this is that the golden age of films is not after the 60s but before which means you are missing a bunch of amazing films.

 

While it is all well and good to watch movies based on depression era novels, it is important to have watched movies that were made then which are lush. What does that mean.

 

To help you might find a used text on movie history. But on the cheap and quick even Wikipedia has an article on film history: http://en.wikipedia....History_of_film

We do this too. However, the ones made at the time are easy to find ( I use the Wikipedia article you posted), however it is not so easy to find the ones about the different time periods unless you know titles. So I appreciate both things.

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