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I dont know.


MamaOfMany
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I dont know.

 

That seems to be my answer.

 

What kind of schooling do we want to do?

What do we believe?

What foundation do we want?

What goals do we have?

What do we want to acomplish?

What why how who....

 

I dont know.

 

I do know that public school is failing us and privet is not an option. The cost is just way out of the way for us. I do know that I know my children. I know that I can help them learn and grow and become amazing adults who love to learn. I know I can work with them one on one and help them in their weak spots and grow and expand their interest in those subjects that they just cant seem to know enough about.

 

I dont know much about homeschooling right now. Its not a road I have been down. I do know I love my children and want whats best for them. Public school is no longer that. That I do know.

 

Anyone else been in this boat?

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If it makes you feel any better, I felt the same as you a few months ago. Hey wait a minute, sometimes I still feel that way! And I'm only homeschooling one, my oldest (dd10; I also have 6, 10 to 1). I don't know what I'd do if I had to homeschool all of them at once - even trying to homeschool the oldest three might cause our entire house to spontaneously combust from the friction involved :glare:.

 

You'll figure it out. Your alternative (the PS) isn't particularly attractive, from what you write. It sounds like that's been excluded. You can do this, one step at a time. I think you're on the right path.

 

(By the way I sent you a PM - check your in box)

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I've been there. I found looking and the long term first helped, and then I worked my way backwards to the beginning.

 

What goals do we have?/What do we want to accomplish? - This might be better phrased as "What do you imagine your children doing when they graduate high school?" Then, work your way backwards keeping your end goal in mind. Do you want them to be technology wizards? Do you want them to know how to diagram a sentence? Do you want them to be ambassadors of your religion? Do you want them to read the classics? If you do, do you want them to read those classics in their original languages (Greek or Latin for example)? It's perfectly fine to answer questions as "no." It's your school and your kids. I assume you have hopes and dreams for your children. Start there, and try to follow a path that will accommodate those dreams.

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I literally just got done watching Waiting For Superman. Not that I wasn't resolved before but now I am even more solidified in the decision to take my children's education in my own hands.

 

I'm sure I will always have my doubts; but I firmly believe that seed of doubt is what fuels us to do our very best. If we assumed we were doing things perfectly then we would probably get a bit complacent and end up missing something. That underlying fear can be used in a positive way to help guide you on your homeschooling path.

 

Best of luck and determination to you. Best to us all.

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Read, read, read. When are you planning to start? If you're shooting for the fall, spend a month or so now reading lots of different homeschooling info, just to get an idea of what's out there. Read The Well-Trained Mind, if you haven't yet. Read up on different philosophies/ideas about homeschooling--I'll bet that as you go, something will click ("Hey, that really sounds like our family," or "THAT'S the kind of education we want for our kids!"). Read lots of threads here--I learned TONS here, especially about different curricula. Pretty much everything we use now I either heard about here or my choice was solidified after reading about it here. This is such a diverse board--there's always SOMEONE else who has experience with almost any curriculum you can come up with.

 

You say you know your kids--that's a great place to start! As you learn about different approaches to homeschooling, keep their personalities and needs in mind. Different kids need different things, and that will affect your curriculum choices.

 

Focus on the basics first--more than anything you'll need to make sure that your kids' basic skills in reading, writing, and math are solid. So I'd start there, by taking stock of where your kids are and where they need to go from here.

 

Remember that it's one day at a time, one step at a time. Keep the steady progress and you'll be amazed how much you get accomplished. You CAN do it!

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i feel the same way. i have been homeschooling for almost a year (this june) and i am a long long way from figuring this out.

elegantlion(i think) posted on another thread that she'd recommend rereading the homeschooling style/philosophy books after a year of homeschooling. i see wisdom in that. it is good to read as much as possible before hand so you can go into things with a plan...but I think after actually doing it for a while, you will learn a lot more about yourself and your children...so if you don't know exactly your goals/philosophy/teaching and learning styles/etc you will work those out.

i'm looking forward to rereading some things with a little experience(good and bad) under my belt.

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Been there!

 

Got out of that. Cathy Duffy's book 100 Top Picks for Homeschool Curriculum was a huge help-- she asked a lot of guided questions that really helped me figure out the answers to exactly the questions you were posing-- see my blog post on the subject:

 

(March 27 post is the Hillandale Farm School Philosophy):

 

http://hillandalefarmschool.blogspot.com/

 

Once I understood where we were and what we wanted to do and why we wanted to do it, The Well-Trained Mind suddenly made sense to me, and I was ready to start making some good decisions.

 

Jen

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Got out of that. Cathy Duffy's book 100 Top Picks for Homeschool Curriculum was a huge help-- she asked a lot of guided questions that really helped me figure out the answers to exactly the questions you were posing

 

Yes. I learned I was a closet Charlotte Mason type, with neo-Classical running a close second. Your library can get it for you. It was not worth the price new, for me.

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Yes. I learned I was a closet Charlotte Mason type, with neo-Classical running a close second. Your library can get it for you. It was not worth the price new, for me.

 

 

:iagree:

 

I should have mentioned that I got the book from my local library! Thanks for bringing that up!

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:grouphug::grouphug:

Oh, yes, yes, yes. That was almost 2 years ago for us. It was so frustrating to ask about curricula and just get questions about our philosophy and children's learning styles instead of some solid suggestions. I just felt like :confused: all the time. I wrote about it in my blog and included some resources that really helped me. And here are some additional thoughts on getting started.

  • Ask about one subject at a time. You will get better, more thoughtful answers.
  • Ask questions such as "What do you use?", "Why does it or didn't it work for you?"
  • Avoid investing in expensive or multi-year curricula the first year. It takes the whole first year to figure out what you really need.
  • Know that no matter how much research you do, some things you pick that first year will not work well for you. You will find people warning you against curriculum hopping. But you are allowed one free change for each subject, assuming that change is due to adopting a different philosophy, gaining an understanding of your dc's learning styles, or adapting to new circumstances.

You can't know everything you need to know for the first year, because much of that knowledge comes with the doing. You are going to feel a little out of your element the first year. Everybody does, even those parents who were themselves homeschooled. Just take a deep breath and get on the roller coaster. It will all be okay. :grouphug:

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I do know that public school is failing us and privet is not an option. The cost is just way out of the way for us. I do know that I know my children. I know that I can help them learn and grow and become amazing adults who love to learn. I know I can work with them one on one and help them in their weak spots and grow and expand their interest in those subjects that they just cant seem to know enough about.

 

 

Start with what you know.

1. Public school is failing us.

Why? What isn't happening there? Is the learning environment bad? Is the curriculum a problem? Is the lack on one-on-one instruction the main issue? You can correct all of that with a home education, but it is useful to identify the main problems so that you can target them in your upcoming year.

 

2. Private is not an option.

Same here, and I've only go two. I would have to work full time to add enough money for two children in private school. Not possible in our small town. I have to work two hours out of town two to three days a week as it is to make ends meet. We achieve this by schooling on Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and a half-day on Thursday. I call going to work my "break.":001_smile:

 

3. I know my children.

And you are fixing to know them even more than you thought you did! They can sure surprise you in so many ways, every day.

 

4. I know that I can help them learn and grow and become amazing adults who love to learn.

It's not enough. You must know this and believe it. It's subtle, maybe, but there is a difference. I can know that I can teach my children, but I have to believe it when the cat is throwing up, the phone is ringing, the dishes haven't been done, the washing machine just overflowed and I've got a horrible headache. I have to believe it when both boys tell me they hate school one minute and they love school as soon as the math concept they struggled with makes sense. I have to believe it when I have to root them out of bed on rainy mornings when I'd just as soon be in bed myself.

 

5. I know I can work with them one on one and help them in their weak spots and grow and expand their interest in those subjects that they just cant seem to know enough about.

Know it and believe it. Then formulate and attack plan. It's nearly then end of our first grade year. I'm checking out their books needed for the week, AND I'm up in bed at night reading about Medieval History (not from SOTW-I'm plowing through Tuchman's 14th Century again) and previewing resources on Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Oceans with my notebook nearby, writing down what I like and might want to use. If son 1 wants to study dragonflies and learn to draw them I might want to pick up those books for him, but I will have to decide how I should integrate that into his school, or whether that should be more extracurricular for him. I have found that there are some interests that should be nurtured, but not in school but rather in private time. I think that the whole idea of cultivating a love of learning sometimes gets turned into teaching him to love school because we are studying what he likes. I know I've been guilty of making that assumption before.

 

For the weak spots-again, identify. That will help you decide how to focus your one-on-one teaching and also help you pick curriculum.

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Public school......

 

I have been fighting with them for years. Seriously. When my oldest was in Kinder she was just so board. Her teacher couldnt figure out how to teach to her. She knew the material..... So we get to 1st grade and her teacher was amazing. But we moved after that year and last year her teacher again was just awesome. Helped her just keep learning and growing with in her abilities. She loved it. She eats up work like no tomorrow. But we moved to another part of town and they had to change schools...... she needs to be in gifted and talented but they wont do it. No one seems to have answers as to why not either. She is 8.

 

Then I started my now 1st grader when I had a feeling he wasnt ready but everyone said nope do it, he is old enough, you need the break, he will do fine, ect ect ect... and not knowing better I did it. And he loved it but was behind. This year he is in 1st grade and getting marks not on grade level. Hmmm guess I did know what I was talking about before kinder. He is 6

 

Then we got custody of our oldest (she is my step daughter but I dont refer to her as such) and she is struggling badly. Math the most. She is getting so much better at reading. I am so proud! Science and history I think she is on grade level. She has a short attention span, loves interacting, talking and only does well when you are there prompting her. She needs one on one that cant be given in the classroom at the public school. She is 10.

 

The night I went to my husband in tears and said I dont know the right thing to do, I dont know what to do, I dont know our options but THIS, public school is not working. And after some thought and talking, we decided that after this year we will homeschool.

 

 

I know we are going to have rough days and I know the first year is gonna bea learning process for all of us but I just cant get it out of my mind that I know I can do it better. I believe that even in those hard long days even if we just get half the work done it will be ok and we will make it.

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I am in my 3rd year of hsing and I feel like that every year. About the time I get something figured out something changes in our life or we add a kid to the hsing mix which changes how the curriculum or school is going. Sometimes for me, the big picture was too overwhelming. I needed someone to say KISS! For us, that meant make sure the kids could read, print or do cursive, math and Bible. And then we practiced all those things and let them play! Their creativity has shot through the roof and their ability to entertain themselves without electronics has increased too.

 

For the first year, just try something. Be ok with the idea of trying something else. It takes a long time to get used to a hsing routine and the curriculums and being with each other A LOT. : )

 

Take Care,

Kimberly

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You will be fine. Just so you believe it, because there will be days that you won't be so sure. :001_smile:

 

You have a number of things to address, correct?

 

You have one child who gets bored easily with work that is too easy for her. What you have to balance is her ability to get the answer right with her ability to understand the concept. It can be easy to memorize answers and not truly understand the work. Your challenge will be challenging her to buckle down when it seems boring IF the process is as important as the end result. (Sometimes it isn't important, but in Math particularly this can be an issue.) As a suggestion, I would also look into anything that you think would be a great artistic or musical outlet for her. She's liable to get things done fast! It will be helpful to have her be able to practice her painting, drawing, sculpting or music while you are working with your other children. It will also give her a way to challenge her mind in other areas, not just academics.

 

You have a first grader that is "behind". And I'm sure he has a vague inclination that he's just not smart enough.:crying: He's going to need a great deal of one-on-one teaching and a lot of hugs and encouragement. Boys seem to have a need to grow a while longer than girls when it comes to going to school. It sounds as if his main problem was that he just wasn't really ready to go to school when he did. Now you have to show him that he can do it, and keep the work to the amount he can do and the level he needs for a while before challenging him too much.

 

Your ten year old sounds as if she needs to learn how to apply her verbal skills to her work. She loves to talk, but perhaps she is having trouble in organizing what she wants to say. I'm thinking that narration is really, really going to be a great help for her in increasing her self-confidence. For her math you may want to decide if she needs help with the process and go to a level she can first succeed at before pushing her to catch up with her grade. Once she has an in-and-out understanding of the math skills that she lacks she will be much more comfortable building on those skills, even if she still hates math. Anything you can do to help her increase her attention span will be useful, most especially things that are not academic at all. If she loves art, teach her to look carefully at what she wants to draw, even if the image is in her imagination. If she loves nature she might learn the value of stillness and concentration by observing birds or other animals that are frightened of movement and noise. To teach her the value of process and patience, you might have her cook something or make something that takes attention to detail. Nothing too hard, but making cookies for example does take attention not only to the quantities of ingredients but also to the method used. It will also give her some bragging rights--"I made those!":001_smile:--and joy in a job well done.

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