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I can be so thick sometimes....


Mommyfaithe
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OY!!! So, for the past umpteen years, I have always read my kids our narrative history story first and then either looked at other books or encyclopedias later on that day or during the week. Their narrations bordered on DUH! :confused: and deer in the headlights :001_huh:.

So last night I am sitting here with my trusty heating pad on my back reading through the Kingfisher the section of SOTW we will be covering because I never learned it and wanted to backround, when it occured to me....DUH!! Read THEM the backround info first....give THEM the vocabulary, terms, names and dates FIRST!

 

:banghead:

 

Oooookaaay....What a simple change that made ALL the difference. Today, when we went over our narration questions, even my 7 Y/O could answer EVERY>SINGLE>ONE in detail.....

 

Really, did it really have to take 16 years to figure this out....

 

Faithe

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That's so funny, Faithe! That is exactly what I've found with our Classical Conversations memory work this year. It is astounding. They memorize the sentence FIRST which has key names and dates, and then suddenly they are all interested in reading ABOUT the person, place, or event. And it SINKS IN when we do. I sooooo wish we had started that earlier.

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:D

Really...this was such a simple...:001_huh: duh...moment, I could just kick myself!

 

So, tell me about cc memory sentences. There is no such group around here...and I am not good at groups anyway, but memory sentences sound really nice for my grammar stage boys.

 

Faithe

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:D

Really...this was such a simple...:001_huh: duh...moment, I could just kick myself!

 

So, tell me about cc memory sentences. There is no such group around here...and I am not good at groups anyway, but memory sentences sound really nice for my grammar stage boys.

 

Faithe

 

Here is an example of a memory sentence (okay, sometimes there are 2 sentences..):

 

During WWI, Great Britain, France and Russia were Allies, and fought against Austria-Hungary and Germany, which were called the Central Powers. In 1917, the U.S. entered the war assisting the Allies.

 

All the sentences are set to songs, which are on the memory work audio CD, so my kids listen to them in the car or at home. The songs have really helped and all 3 of the boys have learned them easily (even the 4 yo). There is one history sentence/phrase per week.

 

You could purchase the CC audio CD and/or memory guide, pick and choose sentences, and put them in whatever sequence works for you without doing any group thing. OR you could make up your own sentences to go with whatever you are studying. Just put in key names and/or events and a date.

 

ETA: Some of the sentences are more general, showing a range of time for something. Such as a list of absolute monarchs during the age of 1500-1700. Or different things that happened in Russia, each with a date.

Edited by Heidi @ Mt Hope
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Thanks, are the songs better than the ones from VP? We have used those...but, man, are they awful....but do get the job done.

 

Faithe

 

I haven't heard the VP ones. I happen to like the CC songs, but other people don't, so YMMV. :) They are all different styles, so you may like some and not others. My boys have all picked them up really quickly, so....yeah, they get the job done, and that's what counts in the end.

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:lurk5: memory sentences...hmm...interesting -- thx! :)

 

I just finished reading The Core last night and Leigh recommends making your own sentences up for each section of history. I am mulling this over; it would be so much easier to just use something that someone else has already created, but I think it would be more beneficial to come up with a sentence as a family that would reflect the period we are studying. The problem with this idea, is that it would be more as a review, not facts that were learned beforehand as the OP is suggesting.

Edited by Roxy Roller
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OY!!! So, for the past umpteen years, I have always read my kids our narrative history story first and then either looked at other books or encyclopedias later on that day or during the week. Their narrations bordered on DUH! :confused: and deer in the headlights :001_huh:.

So last night I am sitting here with my trusty heating pad on my back reading through the Kingfisher the section of SOTW we will be covering because I never learned it and wanted to backround, when it occured to me....DUH!! Read THEM the backround info first....give THEM the vocabulary, terms, names and dates FIRST!

 

:banghead:

 

Oooookaaay....What a simple change that made ALL the difference. Today, when we went over our narration questions, even my 7 Y/O could answer EVERY>SINGLE>ONE in detail.....

 

Really, did it really have to take 16 years to figure this out....

 

Faithe

 

Thank you for sharing this. It makes so much sense but I am sure many of us would admit we never thought of it either. Glad I get to benefit from all you veteran homeschoolers on here :).

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