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The Dark is Rising series?


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We've only seen the Seeker- it was "okay" but not nearly as good as we thought it would be. We are thinking about checking out the books, hoping they are much better (they usually are, aren't they?). I'm subbing to this thread, cause I'm too busy and too lazy right now to look it up for us, :lol: I look it up later if no one has answered though. (book order, etc.)

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Wonderful books, highly recommended. The movie bore only a passing resemblance to The Dark is Rising, most emphatically not recommend.

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LOVE the books! Couldn't bring myself to see the movie as the trailer I watched was obviously so different.

I have re-read these books over and over and over again...like others here I still pull them out as an adult. In fact, maybe this could be my beach reading for next week....

 

Just to let you know how much I love these books (although it's kind of geeky to admit) we went on our honeymoon to Cornwall because of these books. Enough said.

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Susan Cooper, right? Good or bad, worth the read, where do the movies come in, book order, movie order?

 

Under Sea, Over Stone is "bleh," but the rest are incredible. Some Christians will have problems with the pagan content.

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I think they're utterly wonderful! :)

 

You can start with Over Sea, Under Stone *or* with The Dark is Rising (my preferred choice).

 

There's only one movie that I know of -- "The Seeker" -- and the reviews were so bad and made it so clear that the movie had changed very nearly everything about the book, that I skipped it. I was so disappointed -- I had really hoped for a wonderful film version!

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Love the books, remember them fondly from my childhood. Like others said, you can start with The Dark is Rising - I remember I did, and then I eventually went back and read Over Sea, Under Stone. Didn't even know there was a movie, but hearing what others have said, I guess that's a good thing.

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Slightly different take here. I loved the books - very well written in my opinion. But I am one of those Christians who did not like the content - I'm not sure if I can explain this well enough - I felt like the Good was not really good and was somehow too close to the Bad. And I felt like it was so well written that it was too easy to get entangled in the thinking behind the book. Is that clear as mud?:confused:

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I love these books and re-read them a lot. I think I read The dark is rising almost every Christmas!

 

I didn't see the movie--it looked too awful.

 

As said, you can start with Under sea, under stone or The dark is rising. Cooper wrote the first one as a one-off little adventure about 20 years before she suddenly picked it up and wrote 4 more books with a ton of magic and myth in them. So they don't quite match up, but I love them all. The last one is really weird though.

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Dh and I made the mistake of watching the movie... ugh! It was terrible! Though my 6yo liked it. Yep. That good.

 

The books are fantastic. I can still do the entire poem from reading them at 10 years of age--

 

"When the dark comes rising, six shall turn it back,

Three from the circle, three from the track,

Wood, bronze, iron, water, fire, stone,

Five shall return, and one go alone."

 

I know the next stanza too... anyone else? :blush:

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I know the next stanza too... anyone else? :blush:

 

On the day of the dead

when the year too dies

and the youngest opens the oldest hills

 

through the door of the birds

where the breeze breaks

and fire shall fly from the raven boy.

 

(That's from memory -- it may not quite be exact, lol...)

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Dh and I made the mistake of watching the movie... ugh! It was terrible! Though my 6yo liked it. Yep. That good.

 

The books are fantastic. I can still do the entire poem from reading them at 10 years of age--

 

"When the dark comes rising, six shall turn it back,

Three from the circle, three from the track,

Wood, bronze, iron, water, fire, stone,

Five shall return, and one go alone."

 

I know the next stanza too... anyone else? :blush:

 

I used to have the whole thing memorized! Power from the Greenwitch, lost beneath the sea... all shall find the truth at last, silver on the tree. Something like that!

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Seems we were right, and also wrong... here's the whole thing:

 

The Dark is Rising

by Susan Cooper

When the Dark comes rising, six shall turn it back;

Three from the circle, three from the track;

Wood, bronze, iron; water, fire, stone;

Five will return, and one go alone.

 

Iron for the birthday, bronze carried long;

Wood from the burning, stone out of song;

Fire in the candle-ring, water from the thaw;

Six Signs the circle, and the grail gone before.

 

Fire on the mountain shall find the harp of gold

Played to wake the Sleepers, oldest of the old;

Power from the green witch, lost beneath the sea;

All shall find the light at last, silver on the tree.

 

 

~...~

 

 

On the day of the dead, when the year too dies,

Must the youngest open the oldest hills

Through the door of the birds, where the breeze breaks.

There fire shall fly from the raven boy,

And the silver eyes that see the wind,

And the light shall have the harp of gold.

 

By the pleasant lake the Sleepers lie,

On Cadfan’s Way where the kestrels call;

Though grim from the Grey King shadows fall,

Yet singing the golden harp shall guide

To break their sleep and bid them ride.

 

When light from the lost land shall return,

Six Sleepers shall ride, six Signs shall burn,

And where the midsummer tree grows tall

By Pendragon’s sword the Dark shall fall.

 

Y maent yr mynyddoedd yn canu,

ac y mae’r arglwyddes yn dod.

 

 

BTW, I remember one of my favorites of hers when I was a teenager wasn't from the Dark is Rising series, but was in fact, Seaward. Unfortunately, it's been many years since I've read it, so I really can't offer any sort of coherent critique.

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BTW, I remember one of my favorites of hers when I was a teenager wasn't from the Dark is Rising series, but was in fact, Seaward. Unfortunately, it's been many years since I've read it, so I really can't offer any sort of coherent critique.

I love Seaward, it's one of my favorites and I have a (signed!) copy, so I still read it. It wasn't all that popular--maybe because it was rather strange--but I think it's a great book. I like it better than Green Boy or the Shakespeare one or the boggart ones, though those are also good. Dawn of Fear is wonderful, but read it before you give it to your kids.
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Slightly different take here. I loved the books - very well written in my opinion. But I am one of those Christians who did not like the content - I'm not sure if I can explain this well enough - I felt like the Good was not really good and was somehow too close to the Bad. And I felt like it was so well written that it was too easy to get entangled in the thinking behind the book. Is that clear as mud?:confused:

 

The books reminded me of a comment I got from a girl in a Christian middle school that everyone she went to school with was Christian. The adults that she said this to sort of looked at each other over her head and rolled their eyes because we knew of some very non-Christian behavior by these same kids.

There are a couple situations where the Christian establishment in the book is shown to not have the power to resist the darkness (in particular a scene in a church). I can see how this could really offend. On the other hand, I attended a very hollow church when we lived in Germany. I could have easily set that scene there.

There is also the issue of the plot's reference to Arthurian legend. It is sort of an updating of many of the stories in the Arthur tales. So you could reject it as overly relying on pagan imagry or go back to the idea that all stories reflect the one true story (Tolkein, I think).

Jean, I'm not trying to say that you're wrong, just to amplify with my own thoughts. I have most of the books, but I've held off giving them to my kids. In my case, however, it is because I want them to have a better background in the Arthurian legends before they read this adaptation. And I don't mind that they will be a bit more mature in their understanding of our faith before confronting the idea that bell, book and candle may not drive out all evil.

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