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Lamplighter books - Are they all like this? (CC)


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I've read The Basket of Flowers and The Lost Ruby. Both are stories in which the main character is falsely accused of committing a crime and is treated badly by everyone until, at the very end, he/she is miraculously vinidicated and everything turns out all right. I really did not enjoy either book. It really drives me crazy to read about people being falsely accused and having their lives turned upside down and practically ruined because of it. I understand that the point is to learn to behave properly and kindly when people mistreat you and to trust the Lord for the outcome, but still, it just gets under my skin the whole time I'm reading. I feel all anxious and annoyed and then, of course, it all works out in the end, which also annoys me because it is so predictable.

 

Are all the Lamplighter books like this?

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I've read The Basket of Flowers and The Lost Ruby. Both are stories in which the main character is falsely accused of committing a crime and is treated badly by everyone until, at the very end, he/she is miraculously vinidicated and everything turns out all right. I really did not enjoy either book. It really drives me crazy to read about people being falsely accused and having their lives turned upside down and practically ruined because of it. I understand that the point is to learn to behave properly and kindly when people mistreat you and to trust the Lord for the outcome, but still, it just gets under my skin the whole time I'm reading. I feel all anxious and annoyed and then, of course, it all works out in the end, which also annoys me because it is so predictable.

 

Are all the Lamplighter books like this?

 

I don't know if I've ever read one, but what you said sounds so disappointing. Those books look so purdy on the shelf!

 

I hate it when morality tales thwack you ever the head. I like my morality tales to subtly underpin the story. :lol:

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I've read The Basket of Flowers and The Lost Ruby. Both are stories in which the main character is falsely accused of committing a crime and is treated badly by everyone until, at the very end, he/she is miraculously vinidicated and everything turns out all right. I really did not enjoy either book. It really drives me crazy to read about people being falsely accused and having their lives turned upside down and practically ruined because of it. I understand that the point is to learn to behave properly and kindly when people mistreat you and to trust the Lord for the outcome, but still, it just gets under my skin the whole time I'm reading. I feel all anxious and annoyed and then, of course, it all works out in the end, which also annoys me because it is so predictable.

 

Are all the Lamplighter books like this?

 

We have read a few... they don't all have false accusations but they do all have quite twisted plot lines with lots of misfortune and catastrophe. Lots of life lessons. They're good (my kids love them) but they do seem a bit melodramatic to me.

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I read one, and skimmed several, and I could not stomach them, nor recommend them to my kids. In my opinion, what they teach is that if one is good, things go well, and if one is naughty, things do not. This is not what I believe to be true about providence, nor grace. The friends I borrowed the books from definitely believe in the importance of being good as a way to have God's approval, and I simply don't believe that is how the gospel works. I am speaking in a simplistic way here, but that is all I can do right now.

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We have read a few... they don't all have false accusations but they do all have quite twisted plot lines with lots of misfortune and catastrophe. Lots of life lessons. They're good (my kids love them) but they do seem a bit melodramatic to me.

 

I've read two, The Lamplighter and Buried in the Snow. Both were good, but I guess you could say that there was catastrophe in each. I wouldn't say these were "be good and you will be blessed," but both did have themes of self-sacrifice. I'm guessing that in any of these books you will find tragedy, because of the era(s) of their writing. We live in pretty safe and sanitary times, especially now here in the USA. Back in the days these were written, death and misfortunate tragedies were a lot more common.

 

I like them. The kids can handle them somewhat well. But they are hard to read in terms of both content and style. I have a few on my shelf waiting to be read. Yes, they are pretty, anyway!

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I've read two, The Lamplighter and Buried in the Snow. Both were good, but I guess you could say that there was catastrophe in each. I wouldn't say these were "be good and you will be blessed," but both did have themes of self-sacrifice. I'm guessing that in any of these books you will find tragedy, because of the era(s) of their writing. We live in pretty safe and sanitary times, especially now here in the USA. Back in the days these were written, death and misfortunate tragedies were a lot more common.

 

I like them. The kids can handle them somewhat well. But they are hard to read in terms of both content and style. I have a few on my shelf waiting to be read. Yes, they are pretty, anyway!

 

I've had Buried in the Snow on my wishlist for years, but have hestitated because I didn't want to read another story about someone being misunderstood, falsely accused, etc. I don't mind catastrophe so much - I'm just annoyed when, say, a character overhears half a conversation, jumps to a false conclusion, acts on that and subsequently ruins someone else's life. It reminds me of soap operas - you know, like when a wife walks in on her husband holding another woman and wrongly assumes he is having an affair, storms out of the room and leaves him, only to find out months or years later that he was just giving the other lady a hug because something tragic just happened to her. Everyone's lives are messed up all because of a misunderstanding caused by someone jumping to a wrong conclusion. It really drives me nuts to read that kind of thing. And, like I said before, it drives me just as nuts when years later the truth miraculously comes out (due to a letter that was lost in the mail for years that finally turns up just in the nick of time, for example) and then everything is finally ok - just too predictable.

 

Overcoming obstacles, tragedy, sickness, loss of fortune, etc. don't bother me - it's the whole misunderstanding thing that gets me.

 

So would you say Buried in the Snow avoids that whole misunderstanding, jumping to the wrong conclusion scenario?

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I read one, and skimmed several, and I could not stomach them, nor recommend them to my kids. In my opinion, what they teach is that if one is good, things go well, and if one is naughty, things do not. This is not what I believe to be true about providence, nor grace. The friends I borrowed the books from definitely believe in the importance of being good as a way to have God's approval, and I simply don't believe that is how the gospel works. I am speaking in a simplistic way here, but that is all I can do right now.

 

Hey, I guess it's a step up from insinuating that if you are beautiful enough, you will have a perfect life or that you must be good. Why are so many fairy tales linked with appearance?

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