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High school "health" requirement


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I really want to take the easy way out with this. Is there such a thing as an inexpensive, high school level, self-contained workbook or work text that covers things like hygeine, mental health, fitness, substance abuse, disease prevention, and so forth that are normally covered in a high school health class? Or do you have other suggestions?

 

Also, I think I would prefer a secular approach, but one that doesn't get too graphic in the sex department because Aspie ds is a bit immature emotionally and very much so socially, and is prone to anxiety. I'd like him to know there are such things as STDs and how to avoid them, but without scary pictures IYKWIM.

 

I will also go googling, but I thought I'd ask here too because I'm sure at least some of y'all have been down this track before me.

 

Thanks.

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Check out Intellego's High School Health, a four year program, at Curr-Click. I'm going to get it as soon as I catch it on sale. I searched a long time, to find it, but can't remember why I eliminated others. I think because it was so straightforward and not afraid of addressing subjects....I can handle them the way I want. Maybe you could pick and chose what you want/need to cover for this kid.

 

LBS

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We have purchased this but have not been able to get it running yet! I think it is because we don't have quite enough RAM (we have 504 or less - we've tried on several computers) and it needs 512. I had not thought of checking such things before purchasing. I"ve got to call them to see if there is a way of getting it running.

 

Joan

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Check out Intellego's High School Health, a four year program, at Curr-Click. I'm going to get it as soon as I catch it on sale. I searched a long time, to find it, but can't remember why I eliminated others. I think because it was so straightforward and not afraid of addressing subjects....I can handle them the way I want. Maybe you could pick and chose what you want/need to cover for this kid.

 

LBS

 

Thanks for this, I'm thinking this might be the best option for us too. It's in my price range and covers the kinds of subjects I'm looking for, and it looks like it uses a lot of web sites and videos, which might be a good way to reach this particular kiddo. I gather you haven't actually used it yet, but have you used any other Intellego products? I'd be interested in hearing more about them.

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Hi, Amy,

 

I was very, very impressed with Intellego, and only my own inexperience with downloaded products has held me back....I guess I'm attached to having a book or disc or something to hold in my hand. Also, I'm cheap so I like things to be used, on sale, or resaleable too. I don't know what time of year Curr-Click has sales, and when that unit goes on sale will buy it. I forget to check Curr-click very often though. Does anyone know when they have their big sales?

 

Here's a WTM thread with discussion about Health for high school: here. In post #17 I published, with permission, e-mails from customer service at Intellego about the Health for grades 9-12. There are nice sampled on Curr-Click too.

 

Hope this helps!

LBS

 

PS I got a like-new high school Health textbook, pub. by Glencoe, Teacher Wraparound, and I just thought it looked too simple, as in not worldly enough. This kid is the youngest of my three, so is more advanced, simply because of exposure, but he'd laugh at some of the pictures and info in this text, particularly the first aid section. But, he also is a Scout.

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Hi, Amy,

 

I was very, very impressed with Intellego, and only my own inexperience with downloaded products has held me back....I guess I'm attached to having a book or disc or something to hold in my hand. Also, I'm cheap so I like things to be used, on sale, or resaleable too. I don't know what time of year Curr-Click has sales, and when that unit goes on sale will buy it. I forget to check Curr-click very often though. Does anyone know when they have their big sales?

 

Here's a WTM thread with discussion about Health for high school: here. In post #17 I published, with permission, e-mails from customer service at Intellego about the Health for grades 9-12. There are nice sampled on Curr-Click too.

 

Hope this helps!

LBS

 

PS I got a like-new high school Health textbook, pub. by Glencoe, Teacher Wraparound, and I just thought it looked too simple, as in not worldly enough. This kid is the youngest of my three, so is more advanced, simply because of exposure, but he'd laugh at some of the pictures and info in this text, particularly the first aid section. But, he also is a Scout.

 

Thanks for posting that link, it was helpful.

 

A textbook is one of the options I'm considering too. Holt McDougal has a 1-year "subscription" for their online interactive edition for $18, and I may just go with that. For this aspect of 'health' I'd really like to be able to just tell him to go read the chapter and answer the questions. I'll be adding in some other things too, like some videos of lectures from our faith's perspective on things like sexual relationships, and probably some books that specifically address social skills, as that's an area people with AS struggle with. But I'd like to just lay some foundations with a good, basic, religiously neutral "health" text. Your body has the same nutrition needs regardless of what church (if any) you go to, y'know?

 

Anyway. Thanks.

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Good luck, Amy. You know Health as a subject confused me: so many of the things taught in schools, I retaught at home. Not for reasons of faith, but more to correct the giggling and snickering commentary that goes after the actual classroom teaching. In elementary it was handled quite well, I though, but later, not so great. I get that too many parents don't go over these subjects at home, so I am glad so many kids are served by the schools, but, honestly, I can't imagine that being the only place they learn this stuff: not just "birds and bees", "your changing body", "relationships", and and that set of issues, but the whole healthy eating and nutrition, drugs and alcohol, conflict resolution, social and mental health....this can be a big deal....especially for kids who need different cues and clues. I've got two who needed it laid out a bit clearer, deeper, better, more examples....however you say it, they needed Mom and Dad to talk it over. Which is as it should be, I reckon.

 

Good luck with finding what fits,

LBS

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Good luck, Amy. You know Health as a subject confused me: so many of the things taught in schools, I retaught at home. Not for reasons of faith, but more to correct the giggling and snickering commentary that goes after the actual classroom teaching. In elementary it was handled quite well, I though, but later, not so great. I get that too many parents don't go over these subjects at home, so I am glad so many kids are served by the schools, but, honestly, I can't imagine that being the only place they learn this stuff: not just "birds and bees", "your changing body", "relationships", and and that set of issues, but the whole healthy eating and nutrition, drugs and alcohol, conflict resolution, social and mental health....this can be a big deal....especially for kids who need different cues and clues. I've got two who needed it laid out a bit clearer, deeper, better, more examples....however you say it, they needed Mom and Dad to talk it over. Which is as it should be, I reckon.

 

Good luck with finding what fits,

LBS

 

I completely agree with you on all of that. I was very glad, when I was a kid, that my parents had already covered all that territory before we got to it in school, precisely because of the snickering brigade. And honestly, most of it is stuff ds and I have already talked about too. He's just seems to be going through a phase right now (he's almost 14...go figure) where some things are more meaningful if he reads about them from a book than if he just hears about it from Mom, and since we're supposed to cover health as a subject for school it seems like a good opportunity to review and reinforce and make sure we've covered all the bases. And also to show him that things like avoiding alcohol, tobacco, and frivolous sexual relationships are not just a "Mormon thing", these are broadly accepted elements of maintaining good health and a stable lifestyle, which is one of the reasons I'd prefer secular materials for this particular application.

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Yes Amy. I felt I had to give my kids a range of good thoughts about saying NO to these things, since TV seems to make it all seem like an everyday ocurance, and I hear how kids talk, too, from volunteering and subbing in high school. I still talk to the older ones, who are in a position to make their own decisions, but I'm not afraid to talk to them, as I feel its important to keep this an open line of discussion (I do have to get myself nerved up to do it, though.) I have always told them, to call me if they do get incapacitated at a party or whatever, and I'd totally give them a "get out of jail free" on a ride home. This is about saving their lives, not about my knowing of their experimentation or lapse in judgement. Its really hard to offer this and not let it sound like permission, too.

 

YOu mentioned a phase of needing to hear it from someone besides mom....it reminded me that my kids seemed to need to relearn about the dangerous things (drugs, alcohol, sex) every couple years. I now assume its because they were getting exposure to these things, or talk about them, or finally it just got their attention. I agree with the TV ads urging parents to talk to their kids, more than once, about these issues. Its not a one-time decision for them, so the talk needs to be on-going, and adjusted as they gain knowlege and exposure, I'm thinking.

 

Well, I didn't mean to go off on this direction when all you were interested in was Health. Ha.

 

Oh, I remembered a Health resource I looked at long and hard. Its a Walch Science Literacy Series Health edition. Here. It says its for grades 6-8, but I thought it would provide a good start, to deeper parent discussions, but it was written clearly and had fill-in work in a familiar workbookish format. I never got it because I couldn't find it on sale, and I started liking the Intellego better.

 

LBS

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Yes Amy. I felt I had to give my kids a range of good thoughts about saying NO to these things, since TV seems to make it all seem like an everyday ocurance, and I hear how kids talk, too, from volunteering and subbing in high school. I still talk to the older ones, who are in a position to make their own decisions, but I'm not afraid to talk to them, as I feel its important to keep this an open line of discussion (I do have to get myself nerved up to do it, though.) I have always told them, to call me if they do get incapacitated at a party or whatever, and I'd totally give them a "get out of jail free" on a ride home. This is about saving their lives, not about my knowing of their experimentation or lapse in judgement. Its really hard to offer this and not let it sound like permission, too.

 

YOu mentioned a phase of needing to hear it from someone besides mom....it reminded me that my kids seemed to need to relearn about the dangerous things (drugs, alcohol, sex) every couple years. I now assume its because they were getting exposure to these things, or talk about them, or finally it just got their attention. I agree with the TV ads urging parents to talk to their kids, more than once, about these issues. Its not a one-time decision for them, so the talk needs to be on-going, and adjusted as they gain knowlege and exposure, I'm thinking.

 

Well, I didn't mean to go off on this direction when all you were interested in was Health. Ha.

 

That stuff is part of health too, IMO. I appreciate additional points of view.

 

Oh, I remembered a Health resource I looked at long and hard. Its a Walch Science Literacy Series Health edition. Here. It says its for grades 6-8, but I thought it would provide a good start, to deeper parent discussions, but it was written clearly and had fill-in work in a familiar workbookish format. I never got it because I couldn't find it on sale, and I started liking the Intellego better.

 

LBS

 

Well, I wouldn't think there's a huge difference between a regular 8th grader and an immature 9th grader (which is where we'll be next fall) as far as health class topics go, so I'll check it out. Thanks. :)

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We're using Health Making Life Chioces. It is also what Oak Meadow uses. It is apparently the only text on the market that includes human sexuality in the main text. You can get health texts that don't include sex at all apparently.

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Wow! I'm literally writing out my PE plan for this summer, when my son will begin his half-credit "Personal Fitness" course. I'm using a great (Christian-based) book called: “Total Health: Choices for a Winning Lifestyle (A Health Textbook for High School†by Susan Boe. I got a GREAT deal at a used curriculum sale ($10 for both the student text & teacher's manual, both very hefty books). But you can just get the student text (about $22 used on Amazon) and cover what you want. Each chapter includes discussion questions, vocabulary words to define & activities (such as interviewing parents for a health history, drawing/labeling/reporting on a body system, creating a menu, evaluating sleep habits, etc.)

 

IMO, the text covers all the bases for a 1 credit high school PE/Health course. Here's the scope & sequence:

1. Welcome to the Human Body (Creation, anatomy & physiology, organization of the human body)

2. Eleven Systems: One Body (brief overview of all body systems)

3. Fitness & Exercise (fitness levels, principles of exercise, preventing injuries, fatigue, sleep)

4. Nutrition (nutrients, making good food choices, vitamins & minerals, dieting)

5. Infectious Disease (cause, process of, battle against, STDs)

6. Noninfectious Disease (cause, battle against)

7. Stress & Anxiety (mental health, stress, stress-management)

8. L.I.F.E. Management (lifestyle, influences, friendships)

9. Made in His Image (teasing, self-image, appearance, self-talk, comfort zone)

10. Head to Toes (skin care, hair care, hand/nail care, eye/ear protection, healthy teeth, foot care, posture)

11. Risky Business (accident prevention, rape, first aid, safety—guns, poison, fire, water, on the road, etc.)

12. What’s Your Responsibility (attitude, responsibility…as a Christian, a person, a citizen)

13. Maturity: What’s it All About? (choices, saying no)

14. Changing Relationship (friendships, marriage, family, death)

 

Hope this helps!

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