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LisaNY (and anyone else who was there), about the SWB workshops you attended...


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I will list some of the highlights that really "grabbed" me:

 

One of the first things SWB said really sparked a "V-8" moment for me...

 

Classical Education is going out and finding what you don't yet have.

 

and

 

True education comes when it is done on one's own.

 

(I guess that deep down I already knew that, but I wasn't really taking hold of it. Hearing it out loud gave me the smack upside the head that I needed to bring me out of the mindset which believes that you have to rely on the experts in order to learn.)

 

SWB elaborates further by stating:

 

We don't trust our ability to think through things and come to a conclusion that we trust. We want someone smarter to validate that for us.

 

and

 

We feel undereducated as a culture. Our culture teaches us a very powerful lesson that sticks with us for the rest of our lives: In order to learn, we must be taught. We are a "classroom" society. We must sit, listen, & absorb - not actively learn.

 

She quotes Thomas Jefferson, and I will paraphrase, "Any literate man can rely on himself to self-educate - via reading and conversing about what we have read." We don't necessarily need to take classes to educate ourselves.

 

My dh, who has his Master's degree in Geological Science, said that he was never introduced to these basic, fundamental ideas. He was really inspired by SWB. It's funny, because he had no expectations of this conference. He went basically for "away time" with me. It was so fun discussing all that we had heard. I certainly wasn't expecting that. :001_smile:

 

There was so much more that I got out of SWB's lectures, but much of it was in WTM/WEM. It was just good to hear it "live".

 

And here is something we should all, as homeschoolers, take to heart as a fundamental principle:

 

"I can educate myself, and this is part of my calling as a homeschool parent."

 

I hope I have adequately conveyed what SWB was sharing with us.

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SWB elaborates further by stating:

 

We don't trust our ability to think through things and come to a conclusion that we trust. We want someone smarter to validate that for us.

 

 

Lisa, this was great, thanks for taking the time to share here.

 

The quote I included here definitely pertains to me!! I've thought this way for years, and am only now starting to think more clearly and come up with my own thought-out opinions.

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I guess sometimes my family is swimming someplace else altogether. This reminds me of when my oldest was little. I was teaching him that nothing would hurt him if he didn't hurt it (except if it were sick), that of course that squirrel or bee wouldn't suddenly turn around and bite him for no reason at all, but I was in a playgroup with lots of rather city-ish people and they definately did not believe this and weren't teaching their children this. After a bit, I began to wonder if there was something fundamentally wrong with my assumptions about the world. My mother told me that sometimes city people didn't have a lot of experience with the natural world and my world settled back into its normal place.

 

I guess I've always assumed that my and my children's observations about literary matters are as valid (for us) as those of the experts, provided they are well reasoned out. That's what I was trying to explain using the painting example the other day. (It depends on your goals, of course, too. I'm only aiming for an ordinary level of education, not the extrordinary kind. A mentor would be helpful for that, I think.) And if my 13yo watches the movie Kate and Leopold and afterwards, with no prompting from me whatsoever (I was falling asleep), starts talking about how it compares to A Conneticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, then TWTM must be succeeding.

 

Definately a lightbulb moment post for me. Thank you, Lisa.

-Nan

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True education comes when it is done on one's own.

 

 

 

Lisa.

 

Thanks for sharing this quote from SWB's talks. I talked to my ds who is now a freshman in college (actually he finished his first year this week). I asked him how he liked college compared to homeschooling. I was a bit miffed at first until I thought more about what he said. He said that he liked college because he felt he was "learning more". Yet, I asked him if he felt he had learned anything at our little homeschool. Well, he hemmed and hawwed about it. Then I asked him if he felt he had "learned how to learn", and he said," Yes! " Most of his high school subjects my ds had to teach himself. I think this year at college has validated our homeschooling. My ds has taken his studies seriously and studied hard. He has thought about his professor's opinions and discussed them with either myself or others.

 

Thank you for the other quotes too. I need to hear encouraging words as these from time to time.

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[quote=LisaNY;210894:

We don't trust our ability to think through things and come to a conclusion that we trust. We want someone smarter to validate that for us.

 

 

 

This is something I really want to instill in my dc: the confidence to trust their ability to think things through. And I could use some help with it myself. :D

 

Thanks for the synopsis, Lisa!

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I talked to my ds who is now a freshman in college (actually he finished his first year this week). I asked him how he liked college compared to homeschooling. I was a bit miffed at first until I thought more about what he said. He said that he liked college because he felt he was "learning more". Yet, I asked him if he felt he had learned anything at our little homeschool. Well, he hemmed and hawwed about it. Then I asked him if he felt he had "learned how to learn", and he said," Yes! " Most of his high school subjects my ds had to teach himself. I think this year at college has validated our homeschooling. My ds has taken his studies seriously and studied hard. He has thought about his professor's opinions and discussed them with either myself or others.

 

Thank you for the other quotes too. I need to hear encouraging words as these from time to time.

 

Jan,

 

What you've said here is a great comfort to me. I remember that last year at about this time when your son was graduating, you were wondering if you'd adequately prepared him for college. Based on what he's said, it sounds like you did a terrific job! He is studying hard and succeeding and thinking about others' opinions. I hope I'll be able to say the same in 2 years when my son is finishing his first year of college.

 

Congrats on a job well done!

Brenda

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