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Just a note to folks. While my friends in Japan are doing pretty well, I have noticed a number of comments from people on various sites that show how poorly prepared some families were. One woman was asking where she could buy a flashlight because she didn't have one.

 

After a crisis has started is no time to be out looking for flashlights, batteries or basic supplies.

 

Please take a look at what you have available. It doesn't take a major earthquake. Our power was disrupted a couple weeks ago just by a heavy windstorm.

 

Have some food that doesn't need to be cooked before eating. Have a can opener that doesn't take electricity. Have flashlights that work and a couple of sets of batteries. Have diapers and extra formula if you need it. Have your essential paperwork somewhere that you could grab it quickly. Have a plan for how you will communicate with local friends and extended family. Have some water that you could use for a day or two. Know a couple routes from your home to an area of greater safety (including one that keeps you off of the interstate).

 

You don't have to have a huge y2k store of beans and rice. But don't be sitting in the dark wondering what to do next.

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We updated our emergency supplies this weekend. I still have to buy flashlights, as some of them went missing. (I think we took them camping.)

 

I told my dh, "I'll bet we're not the only ones restocking these kits this week."

 

I even made an evacuation list: What we'd grab first (food box, papers, and medical kit), what we'd grab next, what to do about pets, where all of our supplies are kept. The last thing we'd want in an emergency is to have to figure it all out while we're frantic.

 

Cat

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You know, all this has me really re-evaluating.

 

If our house is destroyed, having a stash of supplies really does us no good. If we have to leave our house quickly, having a stash of supplies really does us no good.

 

It begins to seem to me that keeping a small suitcase of extra clothes in the back of the car and a small bag of some basic supplies in a tote near the door is about all I can do to prepare for such events (and even then, if the garage collapses on the car or the roads are impassable, my preparations will have been in vain)....

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My husband saw me trying to clean out the pantry and deep freeze a few months ago (just using up stuff we had on hand). I thought he would be really happy about it because he is constantly whining that we don't have any space for extra food. Instead, he said, "WHY?" He's not an emergency-preparedness type, but he realizes that living where we do, it's good to be prepared. We keep a bunch of stuff down in our tornado shelter, and I always keep extra medicines and stuff on hand as well. We're contemplating getting earthquake insurance since we've had several recently that could be felt and our home is older (1965). Just scary stuff.

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We each have emergency backpacks and we have emergency totes. Both are stocked with food and supplies, list like from ready.gov.

 

We're prepared if we should have to shelter in place, or leave the house quickly.

 

We've lived in hurricane area and now back in tornado central. We even went through a shelter in place because of a chemical leak at a factory. Until then the gas masks dh had picked up at army surplus seemed a little overboard.

 

We discussed our emergency plan last week. We've recently moved, but we have plans of where to meet at home, near the house, in our town, and the nearest relatives should we not be together at the time of a disaster.

 

As I reminded ds, the time to prepare for a disaster is before you ever think you'll need it.

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What's the best way to store all that water. I'd need 24 gallons.

 

Thanks!

 

When we lived in DC shortly aftermSeptember 11th I refilled 2L bottles with water and a couple drops of bleach. I kept them in the laundry and bathroom.

Once I had a good supply I would do replacement after a few months. I used the water for laundry and replaced with a new bottle.

In Japan I went with having a 5gal jug and supplemented with other containers when a typhoon was inbound. One consideration is being able to move the container around. 5gal is about all I can move from room to room.

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What's the best way to store all that water. I'd need 24 gallons.

 

Thanks!

 

We simply rinse and reuse juice containers. Then we stash them in our cabinets or pantry. They came in handy several times. Our water mains were old and broke quite often. Without a disaster of any kind we were without water for two days. We were one of the few in the neighborhood NOT running to go buy bottled water.

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You know, all this has me really re-evaluating.

 

If our house is destroyed, having a stash of supplies really does us no good. If we have to leave our house quickly, having a stash of supplies really does us no good.

 

It begins to seem to me that keeping a small suitcase of extra clothes in the back of the car and a small bag of some basic supplies in a tote near the door is about all I can do to prepare for such events (and even then, if the garage collapses on the car or the roads are impassable, my preparations will have been in vain)....

 

I found these emergency kits in a backpack with basic supplies and I'm tempted. For me it's having the supplies for 8 folks that wouldn't hurt the 2 adults who may have to carry them long distances.

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If our house is destroyed, having a stash of supplies really does us no good. If we have to leave our house quickly, having a stash of supplies really does us no good.

 

It begins to seem to me that keeping a small suitcase of extra clothes in the back of the car and a small bag of some basic supplies in a tote near the door is about all I can do to prepare for such events (and even then, if the garage collapses on the car or the roads are impassable, my preparations will have been in vain)....

 

Supplies in the car are a great idea.

 

But what if something happens that knocks out power to your home for an extended period of time? No running water, no heat, no lights, no way to cook (except a propane grill or camp stove), possibly no way to access medical care for minor medical issues....

 

Not that I'm trying to convince you to prepare differently. :) I'm just thinking of all contingencies. It seems mild compared to what we're seeing on television, but a prolonged power outage is a likely outcome for many in event of a natural disaster.

 

Cat

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You know, all this has me really re-evaluating.

 

If our house is destroyed, having a stash of supplies really does us no good. If we have to leave our house quickly, having a stash of supplies really does us no good.

 

It begins to seem to me that keeping a small suitcase of extra clothes in the back of the car and a small bag of some basic supplies in a tote near the door is about all I can do to prepare for such events (and even then, if the garage collapses on the car or the roads are impassable, my preparations will have been in vain)....

 

The number of people who cannot get food in Tokyo area because stores are empty is much higher than the number who have lost their homes entirely.

 

There are power outages all the way through the Kanto Plain, 250 mi from Sendai.

 

I would rather have planned and risk losing it to the worst scenario than not plan and rely on driving to somewhere safe (along with everyone else in the DC area) and then realize that there isn't a better shelter area. Or risk getting stuck on the road with only what is in my car.

 

When we were here in 2001-3, we had September 11th, anthrax in our mail (our mail was delayed for weeks as it was sent to Ohio to be irradiated to kill possible anthrax spores), two tornados (uncommon for the area), horrible snow that lasted for weeks and shut down the government and the base we lived on, and sniper attacks. I did have a bug out bag ready by the door. I did keep my van loaded with a bag of clothes, water and some food, diapers and formula, as well as a couple routes out of town pre-planned and some cash. I also had a room of my house prepared to shelter in (which we used at least once, when a tornado passed very close to us).

 

Unfortunately, the US does not have the heavy planning and pre-staging that is keeping Japan from plunging into chaos. It's hard to describe how much thought has gone into their system. There are evacuation areas pre-planned and posted in every neighborhood and at the exits to train stations. These evac areas have large tanks of water, designed to support large numbers of people for several days. They have frequent earthquake drills in school and actually practice disaster support. One friend mentioned that her dh was driving home shortly after the quake. He saw a police officer or volunteer at every intersection directing traffic.

Edited by Sebastian (a lady)
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For Christmas last year my DH was given the toilet seat, five gallon bucket gag gift. I thought it went great towards disaster preparedness if our water and sewage are out for a few days. :) We are still working to put together a full supply kit for seven of us, next on my list, sleeping bags for cold weather if we loose power for an extended time.

Edited by melmichigan
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I used to live in a house in northeastern Japan that has certainly been swept out to sea. After it fell down, probably -- I was in that house during a relatively minor earthquake (and subsequent tsunami warning) and I can't imagine it withstanding a big one. Now I live in an apartment building two blocks from the WTC. We keep several days of food and water in here, plus some cash, but in the final analysis I think in our circumstances surviving a disaster would be mostly about luck and secondarily about staying calm.

 

I now respond IMMEDIATELY to all alarms, though. Not too long ago I snatched the kids out of their beds and ran down 16 flights because I smelled smoke and saw the fire engines downstairs. (Turned out that it was just a burning hose in the laundry room.) Two nights ago a plane flew low and loudly overhead and in that moment of waiting I thought, "If I hear a crash, I am grabbing the kids and going down to the basement." I have a friend who was in the WTC during the 1993 bombing and only survived the 2001 one because she kept walking downstairs, even when the announcements said all was okay.

Edited by JennyD
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Unfortunately, the US does not have the heavy planning and pre-staging that is keeping Japan from plunging into chaos. It's hard to describe how much thought has gone into their system. There are evacuation areas pre-planned and posted in every neighborhood and at the exits to train stations. These evac areas have large tanks of water, designed to support large numbers of people for several days. They have frequent earthquake drills in school and actually practice disaster support. One friend mentioned that her dh was driving home shortly after the quake. He saw a police officer or volunteer at every intersection directing traffic.

 

Yes, this. There is a massive infrastructure in place there that simply does not exist here. I was there for one evacuation and people move FAST. Everyone knows what to do (because they practice) and supplies are in place.

 

And even so the toll is horrifying.

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I repacked the getaway kit last weekend (we used it in this emergency)

 

In the getaway kit (this is grab and go....seconds only to leave)

2 blankets

1 litre water/per person

no cook food + chocolate + boiled sweets

a solar garden light

a wind up torch that also charges a cell phone (although not very well as we found out this time...wind for 5 mins, send a txt)

a battery radio and spare batteries

woolly hats, gloves, socks

First aid kit

flannels (we found this time a plaster is useless in an emergency, you need something large and absorbent)

2 sarongs (fold up small, can be used as sheets, bandages, sun protection etc etc etc)

Photocopies of contact details, passport no's etc.

 

This is in a small backpack I can take on my bike if necessary.

 

In the house we have:

 

Water, min of 20L per person. I am currently building this back up again.

I have 3 20L containers, one in the shed, one in the garage and one in the laundry (in case one collapses) Plus a number of refilled juice bottles stored all over the place. I have 12 L stored right beside the getaway kit. This sits by the french doors in my bedroom, it does not look messy to me it looks reassuring.

 

Then a weeks of food, and after this time it will be 2 weeks of food, stored in a special cupboard along with a can opener, a camping gas stove and spare gas (now 5 ) cylinders. Cup a soups, whilst not what I consider food normally are good as they only need hot water pouring on. Also instant noodles. Add hot choc and canned milk for the kids, cheers them up no end!

 

All this I check every 6 months when the clocks change.

 

Willow.

Edited by Willow
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Unfortunately, the US does not have the heavy planning and pre-staging that is keeping Japan from plunging into chaos. It's hard to describe how much thought has gone into their system. There are evacuation areas pre-planned and posted in every neighborhood and at the exits to train stations. These evac areas have large tanks of water, designed to support large numbers of people for several days. They have frequent earthquake drills in school and actually practice disaster support. One friend mentioned that her dh was driving home shortly after the quake. He saw a police officer or volunteer at every intersection directing traffic.

 

This is what I was discussing with my dc recently. The U.S. doesn't have the plans ready or communicated to the general population. There is emergency planning that is done at a city, state and federal level, but not nearly as well done as in Japan, and the general public is not prepared. Schools here have earthquake drills, but most families have no emergency plans or supplies. Had this earthquake and tsunami happened in the US, I think the situation would be far worse than what is happening in Japan now, from an infrastructure-emergency preparedness point of view.

 

I look at the devastation in Japan and wonder, once the search and rescue efforts are completed and the nuclear emergency is resolved, how clean up can even be organized. Where does the country start, and how can they get rid of the debris? People will need long-term housing that doesn't exist right now. From a practical clean up standpoint, it is overwhelming.

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My re-evaluating began this winter with the Snowpocalypse we had. People were going NUTS about getting groceries (stores were low on supplies because delivery trucks couldn't get to town due to closed highways). And it was just. a. snow. storm!!!! I kept telling dh, "This was just snow. What are people going to do if it's a huge natural disaster or a biological attack and we are told to stay home?" So our minds are definitely turning towards being prepared!

 

I already have a First Aid bag packed and ready to grab. I would like to add more to it (homeopaths, more bandages, etc) but it will work for a while as it is. I have a small food supply that I am working on building.

 

For non-drinking water we are reusing the big jugs that cat litter comes in.

 

I really like the plan/list at this blog: http://preparedldsfamily.blogspot.com/2009/05/food-storage-and-disaster-preparedness.html

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Supplies in the car are a great idea.

 

But what if something happens that knocks out power to your home for an extended period of time? No running water, no heat, no lights, no way to cook (except a propane grill or camp stove), possibly no way to access medical care for minor medical issues....

 

Not that I'm trying to convince you to prepare differently. :) I'm just thinking of all contingencies. It seems mild compared to what we're seeing on television, but a prolonged power outage is a likely outcome for many in event of a natural disaster.

 

Cat

 

 

I think you are exactly right Cat. The initial disaster is rarely the problem. It is the aftermath. We came within one powerstation of a major chunk of the East Coast being without power for a very long time in August 2003. (I know this because it was the week my youngest was born and I still have the newspaper). Our infrastructure is getting worse not better in these difficult economic times.

 

The other thing to consider is pets and babies. If taking shelter is the last resort they do not take pets and expect parents to provide diapers and baby food. New Orleans was first and foremost a human disaster, but most pets never had a chance if they were locked down somewhere.

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When we were here in 2001-3, we had September 11th, anthrax in our mail (our mail was delayed for weeks as it was sent to Ohio to be irradiated to kill possible anthrax spores), two tornados (uncommon for the area), horrible snow that lasted for weeks and shut down the government and the base we lived on, and sniper attacks. I did have a bug out bag ready by the door. I did keep my van loaded with a bag of clothes, water and some food, diapers and formula, as well as a couple routes out of town pre-planned and some cash. I also had a room of my house prepared to shelter in (which we used at least once, when a tornado passed very close to us).

 

QUOTE]

 

OMH - I remember all those events!!! I had everything we needed to shelter in place for awhile back then.

 

This is what I was discussing with my dc recently. The U.S. doesn't have the plans ready or communicated to the general population. There is emergency planning that is done at a city, state and federal level, but not nearly as well done as in Japan, and the general public is not prepared. Schools here have earthquake drills, but most families have no emergency plans or supplies. Had this earthquake and tsunami happened in the US, I think the situation would be far worse than what is happening in Japan now, from an infrastructure-emergency preparedness point of view.

 

 

 

:iagree: There is also an attitude in the US (at least where I am) of 'ignorance is bliss.' Lots of folks prefer to think that 'this cannot happen to me' and just go about their business. In 2004, I taught in a school that requested that each student (it was a large private school with an excellent physical facility) have a 'shelter in place' bag sent to school the first week in September with a very comprehensive list of items. My dd was in first grade and one day at lunch we were all working on our class rosters to check if any kids hadn't sent in a shelter in place bag. There was one family whose daughter was in my dd's class and they had not sent bags for either of their two children. The mom's explanation to the teacher was: 'We don't believe in shelter in place.' There you go!:001_huh:

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Yes, raising the level of awareness is a good idea in preparing for emergencies. Unfortuntely, there seems to be a certain bias by some that only conspiracy theorists and loons plan for emergencies. While the suggestion of keeping an emergency bag in case of evacuation seems reasonable, it was just mocked on this board recently.

 

ANY emergency can happen. What happened in Japan is but one. Who knows what in the world will ever happen? It could be a weather emergency, an economic downturn, a terrorist attack. I don't live in fear, but I do make reasonable preparations. Our own government recommends having a supply of food, water, medications, etc, etc., in case of emergencies, yet people still scoff at the notion that there will ever be anything to warrant such provisions.

 

I think the normalcy bias causes people to underestimate the possibility of a disaster and to think that because something has never happened that it will never happen.

 

What's happening in Japan is a nightmare and I grieve for them.

 

lisa

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I am trying not to snarky, I am. But is there any hope for a person who does not know where to purchase a flashlight?

 

WALMART. CVS. TARGET. COSTCO. BJ's. PUBLIX.

 

Am I shouting?

 

Just a note to folks. While my friends in Japan are doing pretty well, I have noticed a number of comments from people on various sites that show how poorly prepared some families were. One woman was asking where she could buy a flashlight because she didn't have one.

 

 

.

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I am trying not to snarky, I am. But is there any hope for a person who does not know where to purchase a flashlight?

 

WALMART. CVS. TARGET. COSTCO. BJ's. PUBLIX.

 

Am I shouting?

 

The person in question is living south of Tokyo. The stores there are currently empty of batteries, bread and flashlights. Many are just staying closed because of scheduled rolling blackouts.

 

Yes, she should have made sure that she had everything she needed ahead of time. Her husband should have made sure that his family was kitted out before he got underway.

 

But to cut her a little slack, having been the one to start the thread, I've seen plenty of forgetfulness, procrastination and hopeful willing suspension of reality all around. I can see how it would be easy, a few months into a tour in a foreign country, with a dh getting underway and leaving you with a couple of young kids in a small apartment to let the emergency kit fall to the bottom of the list.

 

So let us, who are not at the moment under duress of a disaster, look over our own lists and make sure that we are prepared, not only with the basics, but with a little surplus to allow us to shelter our friends and neighbors too.

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I always do okay with things like flashlights, candles, blankets - even food. But I never think of storing enough water. I suppose, where I live currently, I could go down to the creek and boil the water but it would be a whole lot easier to have it on hand....

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Well. Mea Culpa. I didn't know you were talking about someone n *Japan* in the midst of *this*. Where rice balls can't be had, never mind batteries.

 

The rest of you with PUBLIX CVS WALMART in the US. These stores sell flashlights currently, and we are **** lucky.

 

The person in question is living south of Tokyo. The stores there are currently empty of batteries, bread and flashlights. Many are just staying closed because of scheduled rolling blackouts.

QUOTE]

Edited by LibraryLover
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So let us, who are not at the moment under duress of a disaster, look over our own lists and make sure that we are prepared, not only with the basics, but with a little surplus to allow us to shelter our friends and neighbors too.

 

:iagree:

 

With just a little research, and effort, we can make sure that this kinda thing doesn't happen to us or our families.

 

Keeping a 2 week supply of food, water*, and other important supplies is a good (at a minimum) way to protect yourself (and family) from many of the dangers of disasters.

 

I've heard it said that 2 weeks is about the maximum length of time it would take (on average) for assistance to get to everyone in the event of a localized disaster such as an earthquake, tornado, or such.

 

However just making sure you have a couple days worth of supplies would help greatly.

 

 

*Storing that much water can be difficult, but having a way to purify water goes a long way too.

Edited by rdolphingirl
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:iagree:

 

With just a little research, and effort, we can make sure that this kinda thing doesn't happen to us or our families.

 

 

QUOTE]

 

I understand the sentiment, and I think having water and batteries is very important. But. I don't think anyone can ever make sure of that.

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I saw a webcast done by an American man living in Japan. He said, "I haven't eaten in 24 hours--all I had in my apartment was one container of OJ and one package of noodles."

 

:001_huh:

 

You live in an earthquake zone and you had one meal in your house?

 

This isn't that surprising.

 

Take a look on youtube at "japanese kitchen". The Japanese don't tend to shop 1-2 days a week.

 

My friend who lives in a Japanese house INSISTED to be allowed to install a second 'fridge that she purchased in the garage. The owner didn't want it, but allowed her. She can put less food in her two Japanese 'fridges than I can put into my medium size American 'fridge.

 

Kris

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This isn't that surprising.

 

Take a look on youtube at "japanese kitchen". The Japanese don't tend to shop 1-2 days a week.

 

My friend who lives in a Japanese house INSISTED to be allowed to install a second 'fridge that she purchased in the garage. The owner didn't want it, but allowed her. She can put less food in her two Japanese 'fridges than I can put into my medium size American 'fridge.

 

Kris

 

I was going to mention that too. Most Japanese buy food daily and probably even more just "eat out."

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I am trying not to snarky, I am. But is there any hope for a person who does not know where to purchase a flashlight?

 

WALMART. CVS. TARGET. COSTCO. BJ's. PUBLIX.

 

Am I shouting?

 

Where are you going to purchase a flashlight when those places are out?

 

Let me give you some idea of what the local Japanese stores mainly look like:

 

Article

 

I purchased the last two large sized Maglights at the NEX on Sunday. I still can't find my flashlights.

 

My dh filled our van's gas tank on Monday RIGHT after the gas truck left. The gas stations on both bases are currently out of gas.

 

Just because you know right NOW where you would purchase something, doesn't mean they are still there now.

 

Kris

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I was going to mention that too. Most Japanese buy food daily and probably even more just "eat out."

 

When we studied ancient Rome and the restrictions on cooking in apartment tenements, I was struck by the similarity to Japan. Not that there are any restrictions on cooking in Japanese homes. But just that it seems like much of the "cooking" goes on in all of the tiny restaurants that are everywhere.

 

I'm not surprised that folks didn't have a lot of food stored up. I remember being amazed that you could cook anything in the kitchens I saw on tv shows there. (For perspective, one home remodel show I saw made a big deal of installing a dishwasher in the kitchen. It was up on a shelf above the counter and was about the size of a large microwave. The wife was overjoyed at the new convenience.) So there really isn't that much room to store a large supply of food. And Calorie Block would get pretty tiresome very quickly.

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Where are you going to purchase a flashlight when those places are out?

 

Let me give you some idea of what the local Japanese stores mainly look like:

 

Article

 

I purchased the last two large sized Maglights at the NEX on Sunday. I still can't find my flashlights.

 

My dh filled our van's gas tank on Monday RIGHT after the gas truck left. The gas stations on both bases are currently out of gas.

 

Just because you know right NOW where you would purchase something, doesn't mean they are still there now.

 

Kris

 

Another good lesson from Japan is that while stores may be able to be open and selling supplies on a limited basis, they may only be able to accept cash.

 

In the Tokyo area, there are many reports of stores being open, but without electricity. With no electricity, there is no way to process a credit or debit card. (A disruption in phone service could have a similar impact.)

 

It's common in the US to only cary a small amount of cash and use plastic for everything else. That might be another thing to consider.

 

Kris, I hope everything stays (relatively) calm today and that communication flows smoothly and quickly. Let me know if there is anything that I could possibly do to help from here. All the KPHS families are in my prayers.

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Another good lesson from Japan is that while stores may be able to be open and selling supplies on a limited basis, they may only be able to accept cash.

 

In the Tokyo area, there are many reports of stores being open, but without electricity. With no electricity, there is no way to process a credit or debit card. (A disruption in phone service could have a similar impact.)

 

It's common in the US to only cary a small amount of cash and use plastic for everything else. That might be another thing to consider.

 

Kris, I hope everything stays (relatively) calm today and that communication flows smoothly and quickly. Let me know if there is anything that I could possibly do to help from here. All the KPHS families are in my prayers.

 

Thanks Lisa!

 

I'm so tired right now. If you could just bop me over the head an guarantee me 7-8 hours of sleep I'd be very very very happy.

 

I am just. so. tired.

 

Kris

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& the first thing he's to do is put together his "get-away kit" to carry with him. I sent with him 2 dozen museli bars & a big bag of cashews. Not much, but I figured at least he'd have something, in case another EQ hit today. He has torches, raincoats, cell phone, etc. as part of his normal work gear. He'll fill his backpack with his "kit" today. As he was flying down, it was not practical to send a full kit with him. As there are predictions (not scientific) of another big EQ hitting NZ on the 20th, we'd all feel better knowing that he's prepared. (I'd feel even better if he decides to visit his brother an hour of south of CHCH for sunday dinner that day ;) )

 

You don't have to live in an EQ zone to need an emergency kit. Growing up in VT, having enough food in the house & an alternate source of lighting, heating, & cooking facilities was very important for those days that were were snowbound without electricity. (& I did not live in a rural area.) My mom always had a get-away bag packed & ready in the front coat closet, to grab in case of fire.

 

My goal while dh is away is to get our emergency kit more organized. We have the gear, cash, & food in the house, but it isn't ready to grab if we needed to evacuate. I also need to talk with my dc & set alternate meeting places if we are not together at home in times of crisis. I don't normally keep cash in the car, except for a small amount of coin for parking, but this may be a good idea to have on hand.

 

PS---thanks Willow for your list. It gives me a starting point for gathering our gear.

 

Blessings,

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What's the best way to store all that water. I'd need 24 gallons.

 

Thanks!

 

Something we've bought that I'm really happy about are these BOB bags. We live where hurricanes are our biggest consideration, so we'd have time to fill these up. waterbob.com We have 3 tubs, so I bought 3. This wouldn't really work in some other emergency situations like tornadoes or earthquakes because you wouldn't have warning.

 

You know, all this has me really re-evaluating.

 

If our house is destroyed, having a stash of supplies really does us no good. If we have to leave our house quickly, having a stash of supplies really does us no good.

 

It begins to seem to me that keeping a small suitcase of extra clothes in the back of the car and a small bag of some basic supplies in a tote near the door is about all I can do to prepare for such events (and even then, if the garage collapses on the car or the roads are impassable, my preparations will have been in vain)....

 

Definitely research "bug-out bags". That's the most used title for bags prepared to run out the door with. I haven't done anything about these like I plan to but my husband has been stocking a bit of what we'd need to take with us. I've been mildly focused on "bugging-in". I'm going to be canning this year for the first time ever. Freezing wouldn't be any good because of the possibility of lost power.

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Good thread to start!

 

I can't find ANY of my flashlights and batteries. I put them together in one "safe place"........... and only the good Lord has any idea where I hid them.

:glare::glare:

 

Kris

 

We lost power a couple weeks ago. Thankfully, just for a few hours, but long enough that I had kids scrambling to try to find all of the camping lights and water bottles that were just barely unpacked. One thing I notice is that the bathrooms are really dark, so I put a camp light in the one that gets heavy use.

 

Hope you find your flashlights soon. One thing that has helped us is to have a couple emergency flashlights (our family swears by Pelican lights I've been using mine for almost 20 years and have even dropped it several stories in fuel tanks I was testing. Works great.) and then plenty of inexpensive flashlights for the kids to mess with. They know that death and destruction will rain down on them if I catch them playing with any of the good lights.

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