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Melissa in Australia

Nuclear Reactor melt down Japan

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I am so happy to read these posts. My dh is a scientist (environmental, not nuclear) and he and his collegues agree that one of the worst things about this is the fact that lay people tend to react and panic. He says people see the word 'hydrogen' and think nuke bombs, and it's not that at all!

 

This is all the talk in our science community, and they agree that these reactors are *nothing* like Chernobly, and Japan is nothing like the old Soviet Union.

 

People do need to step back here and try to read non hysterical information from people who know. Coastal Japan is a mess and it's epic, but some people are going off the deep end with this panic. My husband, and sceintists like him, who have a real understanding of what's involved here, have no reason to lie to people about what is real and what isn't. There might be a time to run and panic like crazy, but it's not now. Save the iodine pills. You might need them sometime, but not today, not yet.

 

Thank you!

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Question for Wendi, Perry, or anyone else who feels qualified to chime in ;): I've been reading the blogs, articles, etc., that have been linked here (and other places on the net today) wherein some of them recommend Americans take iodine now. Do you feel this is overkill? Not necessary? Erring on the side of caution, or what?

 

:iagree: That's what I'm wondering. Would the radiation reach us in the US? I am perfectly happy to buy iodine for my family to keep us safe, but living in MI, is it necessary or the smart thing to do?

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:iagree: That's what I'm wondering. Would the radiation reach us in the US? I am perfectly happy to buy iodine for my family to keep us safe, but living in MI, is it necessary or the smart thing to do?

 

I'm wondering this, too. Will folks in the midwest or east need iodine?

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Iodine pills in the mid west? I think that is really jumping the gun here. That's called panic. And it's not helpful to one's mental health.

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Iodine pills in the mid west? I think that is really jumping the gun here. That's called panic. And it's not helpful to one's mental health.

 

I agree. I don't particularly want to run out and get iodine pills if it's unnecessary. But a pp in SC was talking about iodine, so I was wondering just how far-reaching this radiation cloud is supposed to be, kwim?

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Well, seeing as how I have never experienced a nuclear disaster before and know nothing on the subject, I have no clue how far reaching radiation can travel. :confused: I was seriously wondering if all hell broke loose and there was a complete meltdown, would the radiation travel to the midwest? Sorry for my ignorance.

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My DH found this link while researching the situation in Japan. My DH & I have been researching nuclear explosions since last week, as we are on the west coast and concerned. This article has put things into perspective. This was actually written for those in Australia who are even closer to Japan. The more I have learned about nuclear plants, I have become less worried -- but I'm still concerned, specifically for those in Japan, among the other issues they are dealing with. Now I understand what makes up these plants and how they function today as compared to Chernobyl and other really bad nuclear plant explosions/fall out. Knowledge to the rescue :c)!

 

Please read this and other sources to get the best overall picture of what is going on:

http://morgsatlarge.wordpress.com/2011/03/13/why-i-am-not-worried-about-japans-nuclear-reactors/

 

Also, here is another explanation from the NYT that is visual/interesting:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/03/12/world/asia/the-explosion-at-the-japanese-reactor.html?ref=asia

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Well, seeing as how I have never experienced a nuclear disaster before and know nothing on the subject, I have no clue how far reaching radiation can travel. :confused: I was seriously wondering if all hell broke loose and there was a complete meltdown, would the radiation travel to the midwest? Sorry for my ignorance.

 

 

(((hugs))) I think it's good to be concerned and informed. The words radiation and nuclear are scary considering the events they have been linked to in the past. Any time radiation is leaked into the environment in unsafe amounts it raises concerns. Right now, they are unsure how much is being leaked and how much people have absorbed (who live close to the plant).

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and here is some more information. http://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/-/world/9010324/quake-ravaged-japan-battles-against-nuclear-meltdown/

 

quote "

There were earlier partial meltdowns of the fuel rods at both the No. 1 and the No. 3 reactors, where the explosions had occurred. A TEPCO official said the situation in the No. 2 reactor was even worse than in the other units."..........

"France's ASN nuclear safety authority said the accident could be classified as a level 5 or 6 on the international scale of 1 to 7, putting it on a par with the 1979 U.S. Three Mile Island meltdown, higher than the Japanese authorities' rating.

Japan's nuclear safety agency has rated the incidents in the No.1 and No.3 reactors as a 4, but has not yet rated the No. 2 reactor."

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Does anyone know what is happening to the saltwater/boron mixing they are using to cool the reactors down?

No, But I have heard that as soon as they add salt water, that is the end of the reactor. It has to be scrapped after that.

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Does anyone know what is happening to the saltwater/boron mixing they are using to cool the reactors down?

 

This is the question I was just asking.. what is happening with their sea water plan? More questions... Why have they not been able to restore power or generate power to assist with the process and/or to restore other means of cooling the rods? Has any other containment vessels been breached?

 

According to this article, the melting of the cores can break down its immediate and outer containment vessels:

http://www.theyeshivaworld.com/news/General+News/86996/NIGHMARE%3A-Nuke-Rods-Melting-In-3-Reactors.html

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:iagree:My husband also works in the power industry selling and maintaining all types of plants. He has watched the news with growing anxiety because accidents like this always panic the general public and turn everyone against nuclear power, one of the safest, cheapest and cleanest types. Experts have already said this is nowhere near the disaster at Chernobyl, a plant that was both poorly designed and built, and run by the clueless. Is what happened in Japan scary? Yes. Is it the deathknell for nuclear power? I hope not. As wendilouwho said, all plants have the potential for accidents. One of dh's oil-fired plants blew up last year killing six people and rocking the surrounding town. No one called for a halt to oil-fired plants. Perspective is needed.

 

Comparing an oil plant blowing up to a nuclear reactor meltdown is like comparing a bad case of gas with end stage pancreatic cancer. In everyone you know. :(

 

I get that nuclear is "cleaner" than coal and smarter than oil. I truly understand how it could be under ideal conditions. But we live on a planet. With whackos. And plates that shift and collide. And building nuclear power plants on the ring of fire is insane. Even if we get every whacko on the planet under control, we still have a planet that does this whenever it feels like it.

 

I laughed listening to an expert on NPR say that "statistically," an earthquake of this magnitude happens every 100,000 years. Because people then think, "Whew! This won't happen again for 100,000 years!" But everyone here seems to be smarter than the average bear. That's NOT how statisics work.

 

I wish we'd table nuclear energy for another 100,000 years or so. Until the next big one comes and we're hopefully a little smarter. :glare:

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This is the question I was just asking.. what is happening with their sea water plan? More questions... Why have they not been able to restore power or generate power to assist with the process and/or to restore other means of cooling the rods? Has any other containment vessels been breached?

 

According to this article, the melting of the cores can break down its immediate and outer containment vessels:

http://www.theyeshivaworld.com/news/General+News/86996/NIGHMARE%3A-Nuke-Rods-Melting-In-3-Reactors.html

 

 

According to the blog post you posted about earlier and some of the links from WNN at the end of that post, the first and second containment vessels can melt because it is the third vessel that ultimately seals off all radioactive material from the melt down. Also from those links, I understood them to say that the salt-water cooling system in Reactors #1 and #3 is working (this was "Plan B" in the article) and the melting in #2 should be contained in it's third containment vessel regardless.

 

This was my undersanding from those sources. Very interesting article, BTW. It has made reading scientific and nuclear reports on Japan much easier to understand.

 

 

Side Note: I passed along that article and read some to my mom (who is receiving precaution evacuation procedures from my baby sister's high school). She immediately commented back, "Well, does the author address the exposed pipes that shouldn't touch sea water?!" Me thinks she prefers the "animated" versions of the news better. FWIW, she is in Houston, Texas and ready to order Iodine. :tongue_smilie:

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According to the blog post you posted about earlier and some of the links from WNN at the end of that post, the first and second containment vessels can melt because it is the third vessel that ultimately seals off all radioactive material from the melt down. Also from those links, I understood them to say that the salt-water cooling system in Reactors #1 and #3 is working (this was "Plan B" in the article) and the melting in #2 should be contained in it's third containment vessel regardless.

 

This was my undersanding from those sources. Very interesting article, BTW. It has made reading scientific and nuclear reports on Japan much easier to understand.

 

 

Side Note: I passed along that article and read some to my mom (who is receiving precaution evacuation procedures from my baby sister's high school). She immediately commented back, "Well, does the author address the exposed pipes that shouldn't touch sea water?!" Me thinks she prefers the "animated" versions of the news better. FWIW, she is in Houston, Texas and ready to order Iodine. :tongue_smilie:

 

The article did ease my concern, but new reports today are saying the main containment vessel, the one next to the cores could melt too. That concerns me. If that first containment vessel stays intact, than it seems that it will contain the radioactive material.

 

From what I understand from the many articles/wikipedia, we can use anything to cool down the rods including seawater. However, it seems for some reason they haven't been able to keep the rods covered and/or vent properly the heat. The sea water will just become radioactive, can't be pumped back into the ocean :c).

 

Either way, we are not scientist and/or experts! We too are getting potassium iodine tablets too! :c)

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This is the best of 3 articles I have read on the subject. All of them came through friends of mine who are in the industry, or I would trust (um, quantum mechanics physicist at CERN I've known since I was 4 yo, and he vetted it).

 

http://bravenewclimate.com/2011/03/13/fukushima-simple-explanation/

 

If you want to stock up on Iodine, go for it. I am going to get a nice bottle of wine and some chocolate.

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This is the best of 3 articles I have read on the subject. All of them came through friends of mine who are in the industry, or I would trust (um, quantum mechanics physicist at CERN).

 

http://bravenewclimate.com/2011/03/13/fukushima-simple-explanation/

 

If you want to stock up on Iodine, go for it. I am going to get a nice bottle of wine and some chocolate.

 

Acai Berry Tea (thats my thing) - check! Chocolate - triple check! :D

 

This is the same article I linked to, just on different domain. It is a very good article, but I would like to be prepared. Sometimes plan A or B or C (or up to Z) doesn't work out, as demonstrated in the current events in Japan.

 

 

 

Here is a map of the jetsteam for the west coast of North America

 

 

 

I personally doubt the current steam/radioactive parts released thus far will affect us here in the Northwest. That video could really cause some people chest pains if they don't read up on this situation to get a full scope and understanding of what is going on. If anybody is interested in that website showing the jetstreams go to http://www.stormsurf.com/locals/npac.shtml and click on "jetstreams" (right side of the top nav). This just shows the Pacific ocean, but they have a full range of maps for all over the world.

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I have not read all responses, but there is a White House press conference happening as we "speak". One speaker just announced that there is a very low probability of a nuclear meltdown in Japan.

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In bed recovering from surgery and have watched far too much news coverage of this. According to either CNN or ABC (like I can remember which station I am watching when), the deal with the seawater is there was a hole in the bottom of the reactor so as soon as the sea water goes in, it leaks right back out - they can't get enough volume of water in there to actually cool.

 

Yes, I have heard several times that by flushing the reactor with sea water it turns into a big pile of garbage and is unuseable.

 

Yes, there is concern over a third reactor blowing.

 

I was disturbed by the report on Friday and Saturday that Japan is welcoming supplies to help with the reactor situation but only Japanese are allowed in or near the reactor plant to do any work. Um, what are they hiding?? Sounds suspicious to me.

 

Right now backup generators were also damaged during the disaster which is why they haven't been able to use them. I believe I heard a report we are sending power, as are other countries - the challenge: fuel to keep the generators going - the region is also out of gas and the nuclear plant is what provided electricity.

 

Reports this morning they have already found over a hundred people with unhealthy radiation levels. More people being tested and further tests being done on those exposed.

 

The captain of one of our supply ships saw the radiation levels of returning planes to his ship and got the heck out of there. The levels are MUCH worse than being reported.

 

In the stores still open, they are selling groceries with a 10 can limit per family and no word on what everyone will do for food tomorrow.

 

My heart goes out to all of them. My family hosted katrina victims, lived through Ike and Rita. I have seen only small scale devestation and it was a year before life was close to normal for many. I remember during Ike's evacuation people physically fighting for gas, water and food. I remember the desperation and it was nothing compared to what Japan is dealing with and will deal with for endless time unknown.

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This is the best of 3 articles I have read on the subject. All of them came through friends of mine who are in the industry, or I would trust (um, quantum mechanics physicist at CERN I've known since I was 4 yo, and he vetted it).

 

http://bravenewclimate.com/2011/03/13/fukushima-simple-explanation/

 

If you want to stock up on Iodine, go for it. I am going to get a nice bottle of wine and some chocolate.

 

DH and I are going through Consumers Reports' chocolate issue by ordering from one of the top chocolate companies every month. Might I recommend Woodhouse Chocolates? So far, we've liked them better than the number - Norman Love. :D

 

Wine, I can't help with until I find out if you're a reddie or a whitey. :001_smile:

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Some more information: http://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/-/world/9010775/meltdown-threat-rises-at-japan-nuke-plant/

 

"Meltdown threat rises at Japan nuke plant

Water levels have dropped precipitously inside a Japanese nuclear reactor, twice leaving the uranium fuel rods completely exposed and raising the threat of a meltdown, hours after a hydrogen explosion tore through the building housing a different reactor.

Water levels were restored after the first decrease, but the rods remained partially exposed late on Monday night, increasing the risk of the spread of radiation and the potential for an eventual meltdown.

The cascading troubles in the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant compounded the immense challenges faced by the Tokyo government, already struggling to send relief to hundreds of thousands of people along the country's quake- and tsunami-ravaged coast where at least 10,000 people are believed to have died.

Later, a top Japanese official said the fuel rods in all three of the most troubled nuclear reactors appeared to be melting.

Of all these troubles, the drop in water levels at Unit 2 had officials the most worried.

"Units 1 and 3 are at least somewhat stabilised for the time being," said Nuclear and Industrial Agency official Ryohei Shiomi "Unit 2 now requires all our effort and attention."

Workers managed to raise water levels after the second drop on Monday night, but they began falling for a third time, according to nuclear agency official Naoki Kumagai. They are now considering spraying water directly on container to cool it. The head of the International Atomic Energy Agency said the Japanese government has asked the agency to send experts to help"

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Comparing an oil plant blowing up to a nuclear reactor meltdown is like comparing a bad case of gas with end stage pancreatic cancer. In everyone you know. :(

 

 

 

That's quite an analogy.

 

Frankly, I'm much more concerned with the poor people in Japan who are without basic necessities than I am with whether the "radioactive cloud" is going to travel the 5,000+ miles across the Pacific and give all of us in North America thyroid cancer. If you want to 'laugh at the experts' and buy into the hysteria, go ahead. I just hope there are enough iodine tablets to go around.

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Some more information: http://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/-/world/9010775/meltdown-threat-rises-at-japan-nuke-plant/

 

"Meltdown threat rises at Japan nuke plant

Water levels have dropped precipitously inside a Japanese nuclear reactor, twice leaving the uranium fuel rods completely exposed and raising the threat of a meltdown, hours after a hydrogen explosion tore through the building housing a different reactor.

Water levels were restored after the first decrease, but the rods remained partially exposed late on Monday night, increasing the risk of the spread of radiation and the potential for an eventual meltdown.

The cascading troubles in the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant compounded the immense challenges faced by the Tokyo government, already struggling to send relief to hundreds of thousands of people along the country's quake- and tsunami-ravaged coast where at least 10,000 people are believed to have died.

Later, a top Japanese official said the fuel rods in all three of the most troubled nuclear reactors appeared to be melting.

Of all these troubles, the drop in water levels at Unit 2 had officials the most worried.

"Units 1 and 3 are at least somewhat stabilised for the time being," said Nuclear and Industrial Agency official Ryohei Shiomi "Unit 2 now requires all our effort and attention."

Workers managed to raise water levels after the second drop on Monday night, but they began falling for a third time, according to nuclear agency official Naoki Kumagai. They are now considering spraying water directly on container to cool it. The head of the International Atomic Energy Agency said the Japanese government has asked the agency to send experts to help"

 

The fuel rods/fuel pellets have a protective cladding on them. They are contained inside the actual reactor vessel, made up of a really hard steel alloy (cannot remember the name offhand). Then, the actual reactor vessel is usually surrounded by nitrogen, which provided even more shielding. After that, you have the primary containment vessel, which is made up of 4-8 FEET thick concrete walls. Again, massive shielding. When a partial meltdown happens (which is what is currently occurring), only the fuel pellets/fuel rods are melting. Now, if they cannot keep the fuel rods covered with water AND if the temp reaches something like 3000F, then the actual reactor vessel may potentially start to melt, but the radiation still has to go through the nitrogen AND the 4-8 FEET thick concrete primary containment vessel. THIS WILL BE NOTHING LIKE CHERNOBYL.

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This is the best of 3 articles I have read on the subject. All of them came through friends of mine who are in the industry, or I would trust (um, quantum mechanics physicist at CERN I've known since I was 4 yo, and he vetted it).

 

http://bravenewclimate.com/2011/03/13/fukushima-simple-explanation/

 

If you want to stock up on Iodine, go for it. I am going to get a nice bottle of wine and some chocolate.

 

Thanks for the link. I'll join you in that wine.

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This is the best of 3 articles I have read on the subject. All of them came through friends of mine who are in the industry, or I would trust (um, quantum mechanics physicist at CERN I've known since I was 4 yo, and he vetted it).

 

http://bravenewclimate.com/2011/03/13/fukushima-simple-explanation/

 

If you want to stock up on Iodine, go for it. I am going to get a nice bottle of wine and some chocolate.

 

:iagree: and I'll join you on the chocolate. My DH and I were just discussing how ridiculous this is getting as he got ready to go into the plant today. He is just amazed people are talking about iodine tablets here in the US.

 

I am disgusted with the media and all their inaccuracies and incorrect terms. If you are going to report on something to the length of some of these news channels then please have some idea of what you are talking about.

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third or possibly fourth explosion, and now spent uranium is burning. http://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/-/world/9009533/radiation-at-japan-nuke-plant-now-a-risk/

 

http://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/-/world/9015828/japan-radioactivity-leaking-directly-into-atmosphere-iaea/

 

Iodine has been issued to everyone in Japan, and the ABC radio is reporting that workers at the plant will get a years worth or radiation in less than 1 hour, and radiation sickness if there for more than 3 hours.

 

It is now listed as the 2nd worst nuclear accident in the world.

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The fuel rods/fuel pellets have a protective cladding on them. They are contained inside the actual reactor vessel, made up of a really hard steel alloy (cannot remember the name offhand). Then, the actual reactor vessel is usually surrounded by nitrogen, which provided even more shielding. After that, you have the primary containment vessel, which is made up of 4-8 FEET thick concrete walls. Again, massive shielding. When a partial meltdown happens (which is what is currently occurring), only the fuel pellets/fuel rods are melting. Now, if they cannot keep the fuel rods covered with water AND if the temp reaches something like 3000F, then the actual reactor vessel may potentially start to melt, but the radiation still has to go through the nitrogen AND the 4-8 FEET thick concrete primary containment vessel. THIS WILL BE NOTHING LIKE CHERNOBYL.

I never said that it would be, I am just quoting media releases.

I am not about to start taking iodine. Believe me, the media here in Australia is mostly taking about and showing pictures of the devastation of the tsunami. the nuclear situation is still evolving, and appears to be getting worse and worse as time goes on.

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Yes it is getting progressively worse and large amounts of radiation are in the atmosphere at levels that "potentially can affect health". The Japanese prime minister has told the media that people should stay inside and stay calm if they can't get away- and thousands cannot get away due to no petrol, or huge cues for petrol.

And the radiation has reached Tokyo, but not in health damaging amounts yet. Though I can't imagine any amount above and beyond normal could be good.

This could get so much worse and yes, it could reach the U.S. via the trade winds according to reports I have been watching.

Whether or not something could happen like Chernobyl, something IS happening right now that is not good and is getting worse.

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third or possibly fourth explosion, and now spent uranium is burning. http://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/-/world/9009533/radiation-at-japan-nuke-plant-now-a-risk/

 

http://au.news.yahoo.com/world/a/-/world/9015828/japan-radioactivity-leaking-directly-into-atmosphere-iaea/

 

Iodine has been issued to everyone in Japan, and the ABC radio is reporting that workers at the plant will get a years worth or radiation in less than 1 hour, and radiation sickness if there for more than 3 hours.

 

It is now listed as the 2nd worst nuclear accident in the world.

 

Umm, don't think this is quite true. I haven't heard anything reguarding iodine distribution here, let alone been issued any.

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Sorry, Just stating what was reported on the ABC radio in Australia.It was from a spokesperson in the Japanese Nuclear Agency I think... Though they were interviewing so many experts, some of who had translators that It could have been someone else.

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Umm, don't think this is quite true. I haven't heard anything reguarding iodine distribution here, let alone been issued any.

 

SNORT

 

Kris

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I have no idea of the legitimacy of the source, but is the statement below untrue? This is in the worst case scenario if there is a complete melt down.

 

http://www.prisonplanet.com/nuclear-expert-radiation-could-spread-to-us-west-coast.html

 

"But it’s not just the west coast that could be affected. According to Yoichi Shimatsu, former editor of the Japan Times, “In the event of a major meltdown and continuous large-volume radioactive release, airborne particles will be carried across the ocean in bands that will cross over the southern halves of Oregon, Montana and Idaho, all of California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, the Dakotas, northern Nebraska and Iowa and ending in Wisconsin and Illinois, with possible further eastward drift depending on surface wind direction.â€

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Our home in Japan was an apartment tower with a view of the Tokyo Bay channel. We could watch shipping headed in and out of Yokohama and Tokyo at all hours. I didn't need to watch very long at any time of the day to see a ship filled with liquid natural gas (LNG) headed for one of the local power plants. There were also standard oil tankers headed for the refineries in Chiba.

 

As we have seen in tanker and oil well incidents, fossil fuels are not immune to problems, including those whose effects spread well beyond the immediate area.

 

In 1923, when the Great Kanto Earthquake devastated Tokyo and Yokohama, the loss of life was far higher than is expected with this quake. In part this is because of the shift to electricity, rather than cooking stoves using wood or charcol. We once visited the site in Tokyo, where 38,000 people sheltering in a former Army supply depot were overtaken by the firestorm and all perished. Total estimated dead were in the range of more than 100,000.

 

The options for power and transportation are not between good and bad. They are choices that have many ramifications and potential consequences. If there were any country that I would expect not to be starry eyed about the potential risks of nuclear energy or the potential threats of earthquakes, it would be Japan.

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That's quite an analogy.

 

Frankly, I'm much more concerned with the poor people in Japan who are without basic necessities than I am with whether the "radioactive cloud" is going to travel the 5,000+ miles across the Pacific and give all of us in North America thyroid cancer. If you want to 'laugh at the experts' and buy into the hysteria, go ahead. I just hope there are enough iodine tablets to go around.

 

It doesn't seem like my analogy was quite so crazy after all. :(

 

And the arrogance of people who think we can control every variable regarding the safety of nuclear reactors is why I believe we are just not ready for them.

 

I also never said anything about Americans taking iodine. I'm from a medical family. DH would kill me if I started supplementing anyone in our family without his knowledge or consent, especially with something like iodine which has some pretty significant health risks.

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Frankly, I'm much more concerned with the poor people in Japan who are without basic necessities than I am with whether the "radioactive cloud" is going to travel the 5,000+ miles across the Pacific and give all of us in North America thyroid cancer. If you want to 'laugh at the experts' and buy into the hysteria, go ahead. I just hope there are enough iodine tablets to go around.

 

I agree.

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The options for power and transportation are not between good and bad. They are choices that have many ramifications and potential consequences. If there were any country that I would expect not to be starry eyed about the potential risks of nuclear energy or the potential threats of earthquakes, it would be Japan.

 

:iagree: DD and I were talking about this yesterday.

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The options for power and transportation are not between good and bad. They are choices that have many ramifications and potential consequences. If there were any country that I would expect not to be starry eyed about the potential risks of nuclear energy or the potential threats of earthquakes, it would be Japan.

 

Exactly. Japan, that tiny island, is one ot the largest consumers of nuclear energy in the world, and they've had their share of incidents (not on this scale) yet they continue to use it. I'm fairly certain that, even after this accident, they will continue to use it with increased safety measures.

 

Having watched them deal with this tsunami in their dignified way, I have no doubt that what Sebastian says is true. As pqr said in another thread, we could learn a thing or two from them. Let's quit acting like Chicken Little until we know whether the sky is actually falling.

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That's quite an analogy.

 

Frankly, I'm much more concerned with the poor people in Japan who are without basic necessities than I am with whether the "radioactive cloud" is going to travel the 5,000+ miles across the Pacific and give all of us in North America thyroid cancer. If you want to 'laugh at the experts' and buy into the hysteria, go ahead. I just hope there are enough iodine tablets to go around.

I probably should just let it rest, but I agree with Mejane. I'm reading The Hole in our Gospel by Richard Stearns, President of World Vision so I'm rather biased right now. I just read these statistics in the book:

 

The global village looks like this: Out of 100 people

60 would be Asian

14 would be African

12 would be European

8 would be Latin American

5 would be American or Canadian

1 would be from the South Pacific

 

51 would be male; 49 would be female

82 would be non-white; 18 white

67 would be non-Christian; 33 would be Christian

 

Given this, I found it incredibly arrogant that we sit in America worried about us when so many are suffering abroad. I say forgo the Iodine pills here and send the money to a relief organization trying to help the people in Japan.

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Perfect. Awesome find. :) My dh was excited by the sanity.

 

 

Sanity is exciting, isn't it? I think it's 'cause it's so rare, especially in the media. :glare:

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I don't see what "being an American" has to do with my concerns. I would be just as "critical" of our govt. (and I have). I'm sure Japan is doing everything they can possibly do to help their people. I'm sure their top priority is their peoples safety. My concern is that either the govt. or the utility company appeared to be downplaying the scenario. I don't believe they have it under control as a pp suggested. Many experts have weighed in and it's not cut and dry. It's still a volatile situation and no one knows what the outcome will be. My prayers are with everyone affected by these horrible tragedies. :(

 

Just what kind of disclosure are you asking for? The country is devastated by one of the worst earthquakes in recorded history, followed 30 minutes later by an equally devastating tsunami. Thousands are dead, thousands are missing, hundreds of thousands are without food, water, medical care, electricity, and shelter in winter weather conditions. Internal infrastructures such as transportation and communication are fractured and non-existent in many areas. Most governments would find this to be an incredibly difficult situation to deal with regarding media disclosure. Add the nuclear reactor crisis and the information that must be processed and disseminated is staggering.

 

If I had experienced the most terrifying earthquake in my life, lost my home, town, job, and family in a tsunami, and was now living in a refugee camp with limited life necessities and my government came out and said, "By the way, if you don't feel crushed enough, we are facing imminent nuclear annihilation," I would probably curl up in a ball and wait to die.

 

When you have lost all of your past, but are still alive; there is hope. When you are robbed of your future and your children's future; there is no reason to move forward with recovery, no reason for civility and compassion.

 

But hey if we can rob the Japanese of hope in order for Americans in the Mid-West to know whether or not to stock up on iodine tablets, hey bring it on. After all, it is all about us, right?

 

Perhaps there are less sinister reasons for not allowing foreign experts to look at the nuclear reactors. The Japanese have already lost several of the facilities' staff members during one of the explosions. Other governments don't take it lightly when you blow up their experts.

 

That's quite an analogy.

 

Frankly, I'm much more concerned with the poor people in Japan who are without basic necessities than I am with whether the "radioactive cloud" is going to travel the 5,000+ miles across the Pacific and give all of us in North America thyroid cancer. If you want to 'laugh at the experts' and buy into the hysteria, go ahead. I just hope there are enough iodine tablets to go around.

 

:grouphug: Thank you for saying this.

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