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Feeling bad for dd...Everyday Math (X-post)


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Dd8 started third grade at ps in January. They use Everyday Math, and, as I've mentioned before, I feel like we're losing ground from what we were doing in hs. She used Horizons mainly since K, supplemented at different times with MUS and CLE and some other things. Now, I just saw a review she did for a math test, which she forgot to bring home so we could use it to prepare for the test. Actually we never had to prepare for math tests before, but, if I had seen the review, I would have realized that she needed review. She did really miserably on the review, and I'm floored because she never had problems on her math homework and rarely made mistakes on math while hsing. Dd won't get the test back until next week.

 

I'm afraid this is what I have to look forward to. Our schedule is hectic, four kids, plenty of WORTHWHILE activities, so I don't feel like I can devote significant amounts of time to math at home after homework even if dd herself was able to manage it.

 

I'm worried because dd always seemed so bright, a precocious, early learner, but now she's not doing so well (but she is doing better in writing in ps). I truly hope she's not following the path of an older dd who started to show ADD symptoms in fourth grade. That dd did consistently good work (like me ;)) even if she was in her own world a lot of the time. Dh said he had up and down academic performance and dd8 resembles him in many ways. Dh is the best dh in the whole wide world, don't get me wrong, but I'm wondering if dd will be like that, bright but with inconsistent work, or if it's just Everyday Math. Ugghh!

 

There was once a discussion about how kids with differences test well in the early grades but over time, they do less well relative to regular kids. I saw this with my oldest dd and I'm thinking, here we go again. Pray that I remember that my oldest dd is doing very well now academically and is a dream as a teenager.

 

Anyway, I just rambling now.

 

Does anyone have any suggestions about how to help with dd's Everyday Math situation?

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Every new child that comes in to the school goes to a "math lab", an extra class held several times a week to help them learn the new program until their grades reflect that they understand the program and no longer need extra help. This year, my dd's teacher lent me an extra textbook to use at home so that dd and I can use it if necessary to explain terms or concepts if dd is having difficulty with her homework. More than once, I've also used the computer to look up how to do a problem (or gone to the Everyday Math website for possible assistance or the answers since they do provide some answers to some homework pages). Dd, who has always struggles with math at home struggles just as much with this program at school. Her math lab teacher, myself, and now her classroom teacher mostly are using traditional math methods to teach her now. If we were using this program while hsing we'd have dropped it long ago; it makes her cry.

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Have you read One Step Ahead of the Train Wreck? First read that.

 

I would go on the assumption that it is Everyday Math, not a disability in your daughter. You don't have enough evidence to blame your daughter. So many people have not done well with Everyday Math.

 

I'm sorry, but you've got to keep homeschooling the math (or do tutoring or Kumon) if you want her to continue to be successful in math. It's got to be a priority. Look for curricula that make this as easy on both of you as possible--something pretty independent with workbooks. Figure out a set 30 or so minutes per day that she can work on this. Try to keep her ahead so she doesn't learn any new math concepts at school. If she reviews concepts in Everyday Math, that's okay.

Edited by Sara R
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Have you read One Step Ahead of the Train Wreck? First read that.

 

I would go on the assumption that it is Everyday Math, not a disability in your daughter. You don't have enough evidence to blame your daughter. So many people have not done well with Everyday Math.

 

I'm sorry, but you've got to keep homeschooling the math (or do tutoring or Kumon) if you want her to continue to be successful in math. It's got to be a priority. Look for curricula that make this as easy on both of you as possible--something pretty independent with workbooks. Figure out a set 30 or so minutes per day that she can work on this. Try to keep her ahead so she doesn't learn any new math concepts at school. If she reviews concepts in Everyday Math, that's okay.

Ditto.

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Have you read One Step Ahead of the Train Wreck? ...

 

...Try to keep her ahead so she doesn't learn any new math concepts at school. If she reviews concepts in Everyday Math, that's okay.

 

That's exactly what we're doing at home - trying to stay one step ahead of the train wreck! I'm so thankful dc began homeschooling early and that we've continued despite their entering public school. I think Saxon Math one year ahead of their grade is the only thing saving them from TERC.

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Does anyone have any suggestions about how to help with dd's Everyday Math situation?

 

Unfortunately, I'd also suggest finding a way to add Kumon or some other math program even though it might be a little tough to get into a routine. The effort should pay off. We used to teach math primarily on the weekends and then summer. That way, my son had plenty of time for other things.

 

Good luck!

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Have you read One Step Ahead of the Train Wreck? First read that.

 

I would go on the assumption that it is Everyday Math, not a disability in your daughter. You don't have enough evidence to blame your daughter. So many people have not done well with Everyday Math.

 

I'm sorry, but you've got to keep homeschooling the math (or do tutoring or Kumon) if you want her to continue to be successful in math. It's got to be a priority. Look for curricula that make this as easy on both of you as possible--something pretty independent with workbooks. Figure out a set 30 or so minutes per day that she can work on this. Try to keep her ahead so she doesn't learn any new math concepts at school. If she reviews concepts in Everyday Math, that's okay.

 

Heartfelt thanks to everyone who responded.:grouphug:

 

Thanks for the link to the article. I just read it. Ironically, I pulled my oldest out of school at the end of fifth grade so I went through the same type of experience as the author in having to remediate and teach the standard algorithms before conquering operations with fractions and decimals.

 

Right now I have one partially complete Horizons 3 workbook and some CLE light units at home. Are they a good bet for now?

 

Also, should I consider Math Mammoth or Singapore when since the CLE and Horizons will only get us through a short time? Would programs like that jive better with EM?

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You don't necessarily want a program that jives with Everyday Math. I think any program that teaches traditional algorithms to mastery would be fine. Teaching the concept before the school does is the main thing.

 

Then look for something that is a good fit for your family's schedule and your daughter's temperament. A program that is more teacher intensive might not get done. I used Rod and Staff level 1 and 2 with my first grade daughter, because it was so independent. She likes workbooks. From what I've heard about CLE, that would probably work well for your family since it is so independent and since it (apparently) has worked well for your daughter in the past.

 

Good luck! It really is a crime that this kind of reteaching math at home is necessary. But it's better to be forewarned.

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My oldest is gifted in Math, and EM makes her cry. The doodling and guessing and all the other EM nonsense sent her down false paths constantly. What helped us was convincing her to find the right answer, and show how she got it. We also used computer games to drill basic math facts. She finally regained confidence in her own math abilities and is doing well now.

 

Tracy

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My oldest is gifted in Math, and EM makes her cry. The doodling and guessing and all the other EM nonsense sent her down false paths constantly.

 

 

My friend tutors her daughter's classmates in math. They're all in our district's gifted program where they use Connected Math!

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My friend tutors her daughter's classmates in math. They're all in our district's gifted program where they use Connected Math!

 

Last, I heard our district uses Connected Math in middle school. I hope all mine our back to hsing by that point.:001_smile:

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Last, I heard our district uses Connected Math in middle school. I hope all mine our back to hsing by that point.:001_smile:

 

 

That's my very hopeful plan, too! Our middle schools (grades 7 and 8 only) support an absolutely toxic social environment as well as Connected Mathematics, so I am praying on keeping my dc out of our neighborhood middle school somehow. Dd is already eligible for our gifted middle school which would provide different social and academic environments but wouldn't avoid CMP.

 

She can, however, enroll part-time in every subject but math wherever she goes, so we will most likely begin that in 6th grade, when CMP begins and continue through 8th, tolerating and subverting TERC until then. :glare:

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:grouphug:

 

I don't have any advice, but just wanted to post on this thread. I totally understand what you are feeling, and it is so frustrating. My DS was in ps last year and they use Everyday Math...ugh. I just hate it! You know there's a problem when you are trying to help your son do his first grade homework and you have to look up how they are doing it. In FIRST GRADE!! I feel like I am pretty good in math, went through Calculus, and Everyday Math made me feel like a failure. But only for about an hour, because then I realized that it is just a messed up way of doing things, and it is not me. ;)

 

But I do think you should find the time to afterschool a bit in math. Give your DD other ways of doing the problems, and hopefully she won't lose confidence and go backwards. Math mammoth would be a good one, and it is inexpensive.

 

It really makes me sad that so many bright students are feeling like they are so bad at math, just due to this program. :(

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http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=25877

 

This was my post here going on three years ago. We ended up putting our kids in a private school using Saxon, because homeschooling was so intimidating for me. Finally, we are homeschooling this year for the first time. I regret not sticking it out.

 

I'm not saying you should or shouldn't homeschool as opposed to afterschool, that's a decision that I feel is personal to each family, it was just my experience. Be glad that you are aware of the issue and can take steps to remedy it. Many never realize it.

Edited by Mallorie
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  • 3 weeks later...

I agree with the others who think it highly likely that the problem is Everyday Math and not something in your child! I don't try to work with the school's EM sequence; we just try to get through EM's infuriating "homelinks" as fast as possible, and then work in a mix of Math Mammoth/Singapore Math and a quick math facts practice or timing for a total of 15-20min./day. Probably just MM or SM would do the trick, but I am an afterschooling program junkie so I pick and choose from both.

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Hello, I am in the same boat too.. OUr ps uses EM, which I doubt all parents are happy about..

I posted this dilemma on General board as well, shoudl I not get in touch and email other parents, if they are or are not happy with EM?

If majority are not happy with this curriculum, why not approach school director...

Will this be ok, or contacting other parents via email is something not recommended?

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Hello, I am in the same boat too.. OUr ps uses EM, which I doubt all parents are happy about..

I posted this dilemma on General board as well, shoudl I not get in touch and email other parents, if they are or are not happy with EM?

If majority are not happy with this curriculum, why not approach school director...

Will this be ok, or contacting other parents via email is something not recommended?

 

I'm kind of in a similar position - wanting to create awareness about this type of math and the damage it's causing. I've held off contacting parents that I'm not friends with, but I think you could do it if you approached it the right way. I would probably avoid e-mail because it's very easy to ignore and misinterpret. I'd place personal phone calls if you can. Does your school have a directory?

 

If you begin with stating that you've seen some things in the math that concern you a little (like that you don't know how to help your 2nd grader or that you've noticed many 4th graders don't seem to know their multiplication facts, etc.), and ask if the parent has noticed anything like that, I think you'll stand less of a chance of coming across as attacking the teacher, school, etc.

 

It seems like gathering a group of concerned parents and then creating greater awareness with them could be a very effective way to have some influence with the school board. Unfortunately, our push began with a few parents taking on the board and are just now focusing on spreading awareness. A few are too easily ignored.

 

But you're making my wheels turn with the suggestion of directly contacting parents. I didn't want to be a nusiance to other parents, but it sounds like that may be more effective than what we've been doing.

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