Jump to content

Menu

If you had the opportunity to put your highschooler in...


Recommended Posts

a small cottage school with 4 other high-schoolers (meaning there would be a total of 5 students of the same sex) that met once a week at a cost of $100 a month...would you be tempted? The teacher would instruct and grade them in History, LA/Lit, Composition, and Science, with math supervision but no actual math instruction.

 

I visited the class last week and think it would be so good for my ds, but I am having a hard time letting go...meaning picking and choosing my ds's curriculum for myself. The school uses various sources, but mostly Abeka ( Lit & science :tongue_smilie:), BJU for history, and Saxon for math. But the accountability and camaraderie of schooling with other kids my ds's age seems like it should trump my own particular curriculum likes/dislikes. He's all alone here schooling each day and I think he would push himself more if he were with other kids and working for someone besides me.

 

Anyhow, just trying to think this all through and could really use some Hive brain help. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes. That's like what we have here called One Day Academy, although not quite as small, or what I plan with Classical Conversations Challenge, although not all same sex. I do think there is something to the friendships and gentle competition at that age. I'd def do it. I think it probably trumps your desire to pick curriculum unless something glaringly won't work for him.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I probably would do it. I think the companionship is really important. Also, it helps having experience pleasing other teachers. With once a week, you'll likely have time to be interacting on those subjects at home. Not sure what math "supervision" means, but since I"m one of those who could not use Saxon, I'd be asking if he could do that in a different math book. (Just me!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But the accountability and camaraderie of schooling with other kids my ds's age seems like it should trump my own particular curriculum likes/dislikes. He's all alone here schooling each day and I think he would push himself more if he were with other kids and working for someone besides me.

 

I would love to - IF that school was using a curriculum rigorous enough for my DD's taste. Neither she nor I would be willing to compromise on academic rigor for the benefit of camaraderie - she gets interactions with other young people outside of school.

We homeschool primarily for academic reasons; any school situation I'd send her to would have to satisfy me on this issue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Melissa, how is that Omnibus going? Is he liking it? Wouldn't you want to keep going? It would seem doing the cottage school would preclude that. Or maybe it wouldn't? Like the others, to me it sounds like you're getting some of what you want and some you don't.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would definitely consider it, or at least give it a try. I'd find out what kind of commitment you'd have to make -- do you have to sign up for an entire year upfront, or can you try it for a month or two and then drop if it's not working out? You might also see if he could take just one or two subjects from them instead of all they offer.

 

I'm also only schooling one now, and he just craves being with other kids. He's taking one outside-the-home academic class now that meets only for 1.5 hours/week, and he just loves it. It's an elective, so I'm not so concerned about the academic level. He'll probably take a twice/wk class next year that I will choose carefully. I'm willing to compromise on the academic level a bit in some areas so that he can have the social time & interaction he needs. However, I know that I could never have him take math or science there because those courses aren't as rigorous as he needs.

 

This time around through high school with a much more social kiddo, I'm finding balancing the academic and social needs to be much more challenging. I hope you can find a good balance.

 

Brenda

Edited by Brenda in MA
fix typos
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Melissa, how is that Omnibus going? Is he liking it? Wouldn't you want to keep going? It would seem doing the cottage school would preclude that. Or maybe it wouldn't? Like the others, to me it sounds like you're getting some of what you want and some you don't.

 

It's going well, and yes, I would hate to stop using it, but it's not SO WONDERFUL that he couldn't learn history another way, KWIM? IDK. After sitting in on the class and seeing how much those kids knew, and what was required of them, I was pretty darn impressed. Even though they are using curricula that I personally don't care for, they definitely knew their stuff.

 

I was thinking that I could perhaps squeeze some Omnibus in. I mean, she doesn't teach any Bible, just requires memorization, so I could add in some of the more religious books. And though she doesn't use a lot of whole books for Lit, he and I could easily read some together over the year (along with Omnibus for questions, etc.). Next year she will be teaching US History and American Lit...which is right on track with what we had planned...so that works well. And she uses BJU's history, which of course, my ds will love. It's the Abeka Lit and Abeka Science I'm not too keen on....not to mention Saxon. BUT, she said we can use any math program we want, so that's not really an issue. She knows Saxon though and can offer help, quizzes, etc. for Saxon. My ds really likes CLE and wishes they had an Alg 1, but since they don't have the Sunrise Edition out yet, I was planning to use BJU or Chalkdust. I have both. But, I'm wondering if he might actually like Saxon. I despise it, as did my older boys, but youngest ds is a different fish altogether and may actually like it.

 

Sigh. What to do, what to do. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would depend 110% on the teacher. It is a rare person who can teach a variety of subjects well enough for my tastes. :001_smile:

 

The group environment is nice. My dd says the only thing she thought she's like about school would be the competition and learning from each other.

 

And I'd skip the math, because I hate Saxon that much. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

a small cottage school with 4 other high-schoolers (meaning there would be a total of 5 students of the same sex) that met once a week at a cost of $100 a month...would you be tempted? The teacher would instruct and grade them in History, LA/Lit, Composition, and Science, with math supervision but no actual math instruction.

 

I visited the class last week and think it would be so good for my ds, but I am having a hard time letting go...meaning picking and choosing my ds's curriculum for myself. The school uses various sources, but mostly Abeka ( Lit & science :tongue_smilie:), BJU for history, and Saxon for math. But the accountability and camaraderie of schooling with other kids my ds's age seems like it should trump my own particular curriculum likes/dislikes. He's all alone here schooling each day and I think he would push himself more if he were with other kids and working for someone besides me.

 

Anyhow, just trying to think this all through and could really use some Hive brain help. :D

 

YES, yes, yes, yes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, I wouldn't and I don't think you should either. Here's why:

 

But the accountability and camaraderie of schooling with other kids my ds's age seems like it should trump my own particular curriculum likes/dislikes. He's all alone here schooling each day and I think he would push himself more if he were with other kids and working for someone besides me.

 

Accountability and camaraderie never trumps curriculum. If you love Abeka and Bob Jones, then by all means, go for it. But misgivings about curriculum trumps the rest, IMO.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I'm not saying what you should do, but you could certainly do the BJU US History 11 yourself. Yes, the course is quite extensive in coverage. It blows my mind that VP isn't using it for a spine (someone said they're going to use BJU American Republic 8). It lines up with Omnibus iii very well. But you can do that yourself. And if you do, then what is this weekly class doing for you? Sounds like she's getting the good part of homeschooling (the discussions) and leaving you with the grunt work. A long time ago I read a quote where the mom said she finally realized she was going to pay someone to do the cleaning, not rock her child. Pay someone to do the stuff you don't want to do, not the stuff you do. Surely there are more opportunities for socializing?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know, I wouldn't even be considering this if I had more children at home. I see many of you have several. Homschooling more than one is easier for me than just one. When I was schooling all three of my boys there was no WAY I would even consider this. But I have found that with just one at home, he and I seem to go our seperate ways a lot. I am not schooling him nearly as well as I did before this year. I think, quite honestly, I am just getting kinda tired. Or maybe it's just that time of year...

 

I do know that I am not pushing my son nearly as much as those kids in that lady's class! They seem to do/know a whole lot for meeting only one day a week. Like I said, I was quite impressed!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, it would be tempting. No, I wouldn't do it.

 

I'm finding that high school is an incredible time for her to push herself, for her to set her own schedule & guidelines, and goals without doing it just because of a class or a group. I also enjoy her working at her pace rather than a pace set by another. So, while I think it sounds ideal other than my first choice, I'd be VERY tempted, but in the end, probably would not personally do it.

 

And then there is always the old thought that if a child would really want to belong to a group, they are probably the ones that should least BE part of a group, and if the child could care less about being part of group, then they are the best candidates for a group. I have one particular child that adores group work... We are seriously re-thinking our co-op participation because she benefits least from being part of a group. It makes her more apt to "go along" and be led by the group. Opposite of what we'd like to encourage in her.

Edited by BlsdMama
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can your ds sit in on a few weeks of classes to see if it's a fit? The end of the year maybe a good time to try it out. While he won't be in the swim academically, he might get a feel for how things are done. Just because some of us wouldn't be happy with the materials or situation doesn't mean the environment, teacher, and materials wouldn't be a good fit for your family.

 

If your instincts tell you it may be a good fit for your ds, try it. If it doesn't fit, let it go. Different strokes. :D

 

 

You know, I wouldn't even be considering this if I had more children at home. I see many of you have several. Homschooling more than one is easier for me than just one. When I was schooling all three of my boys there was no WAY I would even consider this. But I have found that with just one at home, he and I seem to go our seperate ways a lot. I am not schooling him nearly as well as I did before this year. I think, quite honestly, I am just getting kinda tired. Or maybe it's just that time of year...

 

I do know that I am not pushing my son nearly as much as those kids in that lady's class! They seem to do/know a whole lot for meeting only one day a week. Like I said, I was quite impressed!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, it would be tempting. No, I wouldn't do it.

 

I'm finding that high school is an incredible time for her to push herself, for her to set her own schedule & guidelines, and goals without doing it just because of a class or a group. I also enjoy her working at her pace rather than a pace set by another. So, while I think it sounds ideal other than my first choice, I'd be VERY tempted, but in the end, probably would not personally do it.

 

And then there is always the old thought that if a child would really want to belong to a group, they are probably the ones that should least BE part of a group, and if the child could care less about being part of group, then they are the best candidates for a group. I have one particular child that adores group work... We are seriously re-thinking our co-op participation because she benefits least from being part of a group. It makes her more apt to "go along" and be led by the group. Opposite of what we'd like to encourage in her.

 

My ds actually doesn't want to do it. He likes things as they are. He's a very independent worker and prefers to work alone. BUT, recently we have started going to a writing tutor and the work he is putting out for her is wonderful...not to mention he enjoys impressing her. He doesn't even try for me. So, I ask myself, am I doing him a disservice by keeping him accountable only to me, or would it benefit him to have a different teacher to impress which would then cause him to push himself more. As for the curriculum she will be using, he would have zero problems with it. He prefers textbooks, especially BJU history. It's me who doesn't care for them.

 

Anyhow, he's a very smart kid, but doesn't work to his potential unless motivated to do so. I'm tired & need motivation myself. I'm not sure I'm the one to push him anymore. He is also the one kid who wants to go to a 4 yr university. My other boys wanted to go to the CC and transfer. Not this boy, and that kinda freaks me out too. I'm worried I can't do the job effectively enough to get him where he needs to go. Ack. I really don't know what to do. Part of me talks myself into it, and part of me just does not want to let go. :tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyhow, he's a very smart kid, but doesn't work to his potential unless motivated to do so. I'm tired & need motivation myself. I'm not sure I'm the one to push him anymore.

 

This would make me inclined to do it. :001_smile:

 

We just did the school vs. home for high school decision a few months ago, and it's so hard. Either way, you're sure you're going to ruin them. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This has been our hardest year yet, for a variety of reasons. My dd is a born slowpoke, very easily distracted, and these days she tries to do the absolute minimum required (sometimes even less), and her attitude has been less than stellar. And I haven't been as disciplined as I need to be, either. I stink at enforcing deadlines.

 

I was beginning to feel really discouraged, especially with her lack of progress in math. She started Singapore 5A last March, and still hasn't finished it. We'd been keeping her on a time budget for her subjects, to make sure she covered everything each day, but what had started to happen was that she was running out the clock. I found that one day she had done four -- FOUR! -- math problems in 45 minutes. That was the last straw.

 

The school I'm using now had just started its spring semester when I heard about it, so it was a good time to jump in. They only offer the classes; they are not an umbrella school. They have four class periods, once a week. We could sign up for any number of classes we wanted, with supervised study hall available in the middle two periods. We ended up doing state history (yay, checked it off my to-do list), a fantasy lit class that incorporates IEW methods (her choice), Saxon 76 (which she tested into from SM 5A), and group voice lessons (my insistence). I had a chance to sit in on the classes and decide whether they'd be a good fit before signing up.

 

This move has been mostly for the sake of dealing with her attitude. I don't think she had a clue what regular schoolkids her age have to deal with (homework on the weekends, anyone?). She's spending a LOT of time on math homework now (heh heh heh). I'm worried that she won't get all the conceptual knowledge she needs from Saxon, but at least she's getting lots of drill. I will try to squeeze in some CWP when I can.

 

So far, it's been a good thing for her. She's been good about making her own lunch and packing up her stuff the night before class without being told. She likes having the option of buying lunch or snacks. She'll actually be receiving a progress report this week (another one of my weak spots). They have some good elective choices, too (Public Speaking is on my radar for the future). But she's still home, instead of the crummy middle school two blocks away.

 

For next year, I'll be considering what the cottage school has to offer. I'll have to compare it with my own goals, as well as my strengths and weaknesses. It's a half-hour drive each way, so there's another factor to consider.

 

There's also a K-12 Christian school about twenty minutes away from me in the other direction that offers a satellite program for homeschoolers to take classes and participate in sports and other activities. I'm considering using their services as well, but they are more expensive. They are on a block schedule, so classes are either two or three days a week, and on-campus Bible class and weekly chapel are required for all students. They offer AP classes, and I could definitely see outsourcing those classes for this particular kid.

 

I don't know that I would do the outsourcing with my other kids. They're different people, who might do better with an online class, or DVDs, or just dealing with Silly Old Mom. It just depends on what their needs are at any given point in time. But the longer I have them home doing my own thing, the better. At some point, outsourcing's strengths outweigh the weaknesses. For right now, this school seems to be meeting some important needs for us.

 

If you have the option of doing only one or two classes, then you can avoid the curricula you like the least. It's all about trade-offs. If the curriculum choice is just not good enough, then it's not really a viable option. If it's "good enough," then maybe it's worth a go. It depends on your goals, your strengths and weaknesses, and all of your son's needs.

 

Good luck.

 

ETA: This school has different teachers for each class. It's not one person doing it all.

Edited by FlockOfSillies
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Brenda!

 

It's so hard to know what to do. My ds does NOT want to go to this school. He will if we make him, and he'll not throw a fit or anything untoward, but it's not what he wants. He likes being lazy. Ha!

 

I also need to take into account the time of year it is. This is the point where we lose a bit of steam. We are both tired and a bit cranky, and as the days get warmer we get a little stir crazy as well. Right now I'm feeling kind of lost because this is the time of year when I plan our next years curriculum...which I LOVE to do...and with being somewhat in limbo in regards to this school decision, it's kind of put a crimp in my planning fun. :glare:

 

Honestly, I think money is also playing a role in our decision. Things are already tight right now and an added $100 expense a month will not help matters. But, our ds education is more important than all that, so we need to diligently pray about this some more and hope we have our answer when a decision must be made. :tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Melissa, I'll just be blunt. I wouldn't do it. You said he doesn't want to, and you haven't come up with a good reason except your own insecurities about whether you're doing enough. You have solid courses with O3 and the BJU history as back-up, your science, etc. I just don't see why you need this. I've been going through the BJU 11 history with a fine comb to combine it with O3, and I've got to tell you it's fabulous. Have you seen the student activity pages that go with it? I dare that lady to compare her kids. Absolutely you could teach with this and look like a great history teacher. You don't NEED that woman. You really don't. Buck up and tell yourself that. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Melissa, I'll just be blunt. I wouldn't do it. You said he doesn't want to, and you haven't come up with a good reason except your own insecurities about whether you're doing enough. You have solid courses with O3 and the BJU history as back-up, your science, etc. I just don't see why you need this. I've been going through the BJU 11 history with a fine comb to combine it with O3, and I've got to tell you it's fabulous. Have you seen the student activity pages that go with it? I dare that lady to compare her kids. Absolutely you could teach with this and look like a great history teacher. You don't NEED that woman. You really don't. Buck up and tell yourself that. :)

 

:lol::lol: Love you, OhE!

 

I don't need that woman.

I don't need that woman.

I don't NEED that woman.

I DON'T NEED THAT WOMAN! :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is the second year that I've outsourced most of the subjects for a once-a-week program.

 

Last year was truly glorious. Indeed the teacher got more out of my student than I could have, and it truly was a wonderful educational partnership with good communication between teacher and parent. I couldn't have asked for better.

 

This year was a disappointment, and I should have known better.

 

So if you think that the concept is reasonable and can afford it, don't commit until you sit in class and are able to talk to the parents of current students offline. Be bold with your questions about classroom management, what is done in class/at home, grading, etc.

 

I personally wouldn't do it for all textbooks though.

Edited by GVA
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't do it if I wasn't pretty happy with the curriculum choices, but that's just me. If I thought the choices were 8s (1-10 scale), or even 7s, I'd think hard about it. But, if they were 6s or under, probably wouldn't even consider it. (If they were 9s &10s, I'd jump at it.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OhE (who I'd never normally disagree with :blush:)

 

Oh mercy, feel free to disagree with me, and often. :)

 

I only got emphatic toward the idea of no when she said her ds was adamant about not going. I guess she has to weigh whether his self-knowledge (which it sometimes takes the parents a while to figure out) or the disinterested in doing school for mom thing is the bigger issue. Obviously getting something done is more important than the perfect thing not done. :)

 

And with no kids of high school age, I can shut up now, lol. My only reason for popping into the thread in the first place was to suggest that *academically* should *could* match this lady, using things her ds already likes. Beyond that, I have no clue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I would send him. We put my oldest in a twice-a-week umbrella this year, and it was the right decision. He needed other teachers than me. Did this mean I didn't know my stuff? or wasn't capable of presenting material? or having discussions? or teaching Math? No, no, and no. I could do it. But ds wasn't really taking me all that seriously any more. Not in a disrespectful way, but still, I'm just Mom. I honestly think teens need to hear someone else enforcing what you say, as opposed to you repeating yourself day after day. Honestly, I was sick of MYSELF, so I know he was sick of me.

 

OhE (who I'd never normally disagree with :blush:) is not quite fair in her analogy about rocking the baby vs cleaning the house. There is a time for that baby to walk, and you can't hold his hand the whole time without pulling him down. The cottage school might be a good transition to outside accountability without the horrors of a full-time public/private school. If he's wanting to start at a 4-year, don't you want him to have the experience of what it is like to have multiple teachers and balance multiple expectations?

 

Also, and I say this as sweetly as possible, it sounds like this is as much about you as it is about him. So what if he doesn't go through Omnibus? Do it yourself if you are that anxious to read the books. There is also a lot you could do with him over summer break. Abeka and BJU are not the end of the world, nor are they a sign of the Apocalypse. They may not be GB, but both are solid, Christian curriculum. Period. geesh :lol: So very true!

He's in 8th grade right? Why not give it a go for a year? You can always pull him out it if it isn't a good fit, and he might (just maybe) love it.

 

Thanks Shari!

 

It's nice to hear from those who have btdt. ;)

 

You know, it's not Omnibus or the curriculum the school uses. I don't care if my ds does Omnibus. He likes BJU's History textbooks. He would probably like Abeka's Lit too. He's pretty easy to please most of the time. But, he IS learning a a ton with Omnibus and reading books he would never choose to read on his own, and actually enjoying them. Our Omni discussions have been very fruitful. It's been a good choice for him.

 

If I keep him home for 9th, we will most likely do BJU's US History (the same the school will be using) and add in some Omnibus III readings & assignments. I will probably focus mostly on the American Lit books, leaving some of the World Lit selections off the schedule. So, though I would add in more whole books, my ds would mainly be doing the same history curriculum-wise as the cottage school. I would not have to use Saxon, and he would probably not be bothered at all with Abeka's Lit. So, it's not so much the curriculum that's worrying me, I guess.

 

It's just a hard decision. It's hard to let go. I've been schooling for over 15 years, and letting go feels somewhat like retiring from a job you love. Am I tired? Yes. Have I lost steam? You betcha. But my question to myself is, will another person do for money what I, who love him and want him to totally excel, cannot? Or, is there some way I can motivate him to work hard for me? Do I have the energy to even try anymore? Ha! So many questions whirling around in my brain. I love scheduling and planning. I love buying new curriculum. I love the beginning of the school year. My ds wants to keep things as is. He has no desire to go to that school once a week. BUT, what will be better for him in the long run? THAT is what I am trying to figure out. It really shouldn't be about my desires, or even his, it should be about what is best for him at this time of his life. And I just don't know the answer to that. :confused:

 

So, I will pray, pray, pray and hope that God gives me the answer in a big unmistakable neon sign. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...