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Narration Question


mom31257
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I am trying to do more of a CM narration with my ds in subjects like history and science. I had him read a couple of books on the life of Abraham Lincoln and asked him to tell me what he knew. He still needs some leading questions to help his recall.

 

Because it was all about a person, he was beginning almost every sentence with "he". Should I be correcting that? I wrote down everything he told me. Should I take those and show him how to turn them into better sentences and paragraphs? I guess I'm unsure what to do at this level.

 

Thanks for any advice.

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Is this the 7 year old? I wouldn't worry about beginning every sentence with "he" for a child that age. That is the natural way we talk when talking about a person. And it's okay to give him some leading questions to get him started. If he continues to need prompts for everything as he gets older and you think he either isn't reading carefully or is dawdling, you can always say, "Maybe you should go read this again more carefully this time." That worked for my oldest, he would suddenly remember all about the person! But my second son doesn't do well with that kind of pressure, so I just try to draw him out with questions.

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Is this the 7 year old? I wouldn't worry about beginning every sentence with "he" for a child that age. That is the natural way we talk when talking about a person. And it's okay to give him some leading questions to get him started. If he continues to need prompts for everything as he gets older and you think he either isn't reading carefully or is dawdling, you can always say, "Maybe you should go read this again more carefully this time." That worked for my oldest, he would suddenly remember all about the person! But my second son doesn't do well with that kind of pressure, so I just try to draw him out with questions.

 

Yes, it is my 7 year old. I'm trying to decide now if his is dawdling or not because he has really hit a stage of not liking school. I use CLE for math and LA, and those are the subjects he has complained most about. Honestly, I think it is because of the lack of color. He is a very visual kid, so I got a 2nd grade BJU workbook that was partially used. He says he really likes it much better. Next year I'm switching him to BJU Math and English as well as spelling from ACSI. All of them are much more colorful and "fun" looking.

 

The one thing he never complains about is studying any war, so if you know of a curricula that teaches every subject from the study of wars, let me know!! :D

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The one thing he never complains about is studying any war, so if you know of a curricula that teaches every subject from the study of wars, let me know!! :D

:lol:

My sons are like that too. I finally decided to go with it. I tried teaching history from the standpoint of what it was like for people, etc., but all they remember is the fighting! I finally found a history book that includes a lot of battle plans and have had them copy the battle plans and summarize the battles and that seems to stick more than anything!

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:lol:

My sons are like that too. I finally decided to go with it. I tried teaching history from the standpoint of what it was like for people, etc., but all they remember is the fighting! I finally found a history book that includes a lot of battle plans and have had them copy the battle plans and summarize the battles and that seems to stick more than anything!

 

 

What is the name of the book???

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Galore Park's So You Really Want to Learn History books 1 & 2 have several battle plans each, but it is only British history and it is probably too much for independent reading for a 7 year old, though you could read it to him. I wouldn't get these just for that unless you can find some used copies somewhere; it wouldn't be cost-effective. But, for US history, there is the United States History Atlas. It has other maps besides battle plans, too. You can read to him while he copies it:

http://www.maps.com/map.aspx?cid=2,622&pid=11030

You would be surprised at how many children's library books have battle plans in them. I never even noticed them before, but they are there.

 

Hope that sparks some interest for him!

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I wouldn't worry about it. I think the idea is less about composition and more about content. Plus, I wouldn't want to discourage him. You might want to check out the narration suggestions on the Simply Charlotte Mason website. It will give you a lot of ideas, other than a straight forward narration.

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I wouldn't worry about it. I think the idea is less about composition and more about content. Plus, I wouldn't want to discourage him. You might want to check out the narration suggestions on the Simply Charlotte Mason website. It will give you a lot of ideas, other than a straight forward narration.

 

 

Thanks, I'll look at the site.

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