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Math Mammoth users, say it isn't so!


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Darn you, Hive! You got me again! I was set to order MM during the HSBC sale this month. We use RS, but I cannot be happy with just one program and I'm considering switching either halfway through C or at the end of C. So anyway, my mind was made up and I was thrilled. I've read every Singpore vs. Math Mammoth thread I can find, and I was happy. People say the scope and sequence is different, but the same things are covered eventually, etc. Then suddenly this week I'm seeing threads about how MM doesn't have enough instruction and there's no parental involvement, while Singapore has these amazing HIGs with so many extra ideas, etc., etc. So now I just don't know anymore! Is what's in the HIGs really completely missing from MM? Does MM have nothing but basic instructions on the pages? I have one MM Blue series topic, but it's measurement, which doesn't require all that much explanation, but it seems it includes as much as any other curriculum would have. I don't think measurement's a good way to judge that, though. lol

 

So please, MM users, tell me to stop reading these threads and that you love MM and it has tons of instruction. Either that or talk me out of buying it and into Singapore. Just whatever you do, don't make me decide on my own, now that you've tripped me all up again. That would be wrong. :lol:

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I can only say for our family that MM has been wonderful. I think it has enough instruction to teach the child the material they need to know for each section. I think it explains the concepts beautifully as well. We are currently in 4B and 2A right now and I have had no complaints at all. I have them complete two pages of MM, then add one page each day of either MEP (2A or 4B level), worksheet generated math facts page (ie. multiplying in parts, converting weight, etc.), or a math art puzzle of some kind. I do this just to keep things different and interesting for them.

 

I took my dd9 out of ps last year and she was still working on getting her multiplication table memorized. Less than a year later she is completing 5 digit division and 2 - 3 part word problems. So... I don't have any complaints. ;-) I did purchase the Singapore IP to use during the summer months between MM levels for review, and have used a few pages here and there. I don't have personal experience with Singapore beyond that though. I will say that MM is more of an independent study, but it certainly doesn't HAVE to be. Some days we work on things together, and others she reads and moves ahead on her own. I have been more than fine with that myself.

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We LOVE MM!!!

 

I basically didn't do any structured math with my daughter for 2-3 years, and this year we started with 3A. We're now in 4A (almost in 4B), and I couldn't be happier. We spend a lot of time on math as I'm trying to get her up to "grade level" and we're finally there.

 

The instructions are very clear and thorough IMO. We have had no problems whatsoever understanding any of the material, and my daughter is excelling. I plan to use MM through 6B with her, and my 5 year old will start MM 1A next year. (I will be doing some Singapore 1A with her this year as I have the books and it starts out a little more slowly in 1A in my opinion).

 

So there ya go.....a little bit of a positive push for you. :tongue_smilie: Good luck deciding!

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It isn't the HIGs. If you like math, and want to do tutoring for your child, you'll like SM. If you don't like math, or teaching it, SM is not for you. MM has more repetition (good or bad, depending on your take). For my son, if he didn't get the steps to long division the first 3 times, he won't get it presented in almost the same way a fourth time. I know when I need to be creative, and SM, by being bare bones, gives me the dune buggy and the compass, and lets me do the rest. That is why I like it. That is why many don't.

I start the school day with SM because it energizes me. It makes me stretch my mind on the rack of thought.

 

SM is fairly cheap. Why not get one text book and see if you like the idea?

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This is our first year using MM and we love it here...I read what is said about other math programs, but I have no plans to switch to something else...The instruction has been enough for us so far, the spacing on the pages is fine, and there are not too many problems for my boys to do them all...I know people have had problems with these issues, but it has been fine for us so far...

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We've only completed 1A and half of 1B of both Singapore and Math Mammoth. If I had to choose one, it would be Singapore hands down. Eventually when we're no longer able to do multiple math programs, as the loads get heavier, I will definitely keep Singapore and let Math Mammoth go. Singapore is just so much more in depth. I guess I liken it to the differences between Phonics Road and AAS. Some people like the ease and simplicity of AAS and feel that it does the job. Others prefer Phonics Road which requires quite a bit more parental involvement but feel that it may be deeper or more rigorous. (I'm sure that will ignite some, but it is my opinion.) I think Math Mammoth is wonderful for those who feel that they may not have the time to spend or to be used as a supplement or maybe for those who are mathy themselves and can teach the concepts on their own. For me, I prefer the guidance of the Singapore HIG and enjoy using it to teach the concepts just as I enjoy putting in the extra time that it takes to do Phonics Road.

 

With Math Mammoth, you're basically handing the child a worksheet, reading instructions and they do the work. With Singapore, it's broken into different parts. First you teach the lesson with manipulatives, white board, and things found in the room, etc. This is all guided and laid out in the HIG. Then you move on to the text book where the things you have taught are put into picture form and you can again go over the topic. Next you go on to the workbook where the child can work on their own to practice and to show their understanding of the concept. If you feel they are struggling or need more work, there is usually some sort of reinforcement exercise listed that you can use to help cement the topic. There are also mental math pages and it tells you exactly when to do which page. Lastly, you can do a page of CWP on the topic. Then of course you can sprinkle in the Intensive Practice (we'll be working behind by about half a level as we're just adding it), and you can see how deep you can go with it. It takes us about 15 - 20 minutes per lesson of Singapore and that includes the CWP page. This summer, we'll do the IP instead of MM as my son appears to need a little more challenge. I also like how the lessons are laid out in Singapore so you know what you are supposed to do each day. I've seen many threads here asking how many pages to do of MM each day and I agree that it isn't always clear. With Singapore, you know exactly what you should accomplish that day.

 

I like MM, and I think it's a good product. I think it just depends more on your style and what you want out of it.

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SM is fairly cheap. Why not get one text book and see if you like the idea?

 

That's a great idea!

 

Singapore is just so much more in depth. I guess I liken it to the differences between Phonics Road and AAS. Some people like the ease and simplicity of AAS and feel that it does the job. Others prefer Phonics Road which requires quite a bit more parental involvement but feel that it may be deeper or more rigorous. (I'm sure that will ignite some, but it is my opinion.)

 

Oh no! No PR comparisons! I use and love PR! lol

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I love MM. It cured me of my addiction to looking at other programs. I find that there is sufficient instruction and practice. I do the lessons with my kids so there is plenty of interaction. It is very easy to use and very effective. I could not be happier with how it's working for us. :)

 

Oh see, now that is something amazing right there.

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It isn't the HIGs. If you like math, and want to do tutoring for your child, you'll like SM. If you don't like math, or teaching it, SM is not for you. MM has more repetition (good or bad, depending on your take). For my son, if he didn't get the steps to long division the first 3 times, he won't get it presented in almost the same way a fourth time. I know when I need to be creative, and SM, by being bare bones, gives me the dune buggy and the compass, and lets me do the rest. That is why I like it. That is why many don't.

I start the school day with SM because it energizes me. It makes me stretch my mind on the rack of thought.

 

SM is fairly cheap. Why not get one text book and see if you like the idea?

 

:iagree: and if they aren't getting it, you can add in extra practice workbook or get the blue MM to supplement. We always do SM first thing of the day too!

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With Math Mammoth, you're basically handing the child a worksheet, reading instructions and they do the work.

 

I just wanted to comment on this one statement. I think it comes down to how the teacher uses the material, because this is certainly not how math is done in my house with MM. :tongue_smilie: It's the same way with Singapore too. Some people don't use the HIG, or don't supplement with the extra books, etc.... So while I can appreciate this particular opinion (as it's an opinion and meaningful to the person who wrote it), I personally don't agree with it (and that's ok as we're all different).

 

I honestly think that they are both strong programs. Good luck with your decision. :)

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I just wanted to comment on this one statement. I think it comes down to how the teacher uses the material, because this is certainly not how math is done in my house with MM. :tongue_smilie: It's the same way with Singapore too. Some people don't use the HIG, or don't supplement with the extra books, etc.... So while I can appreciate this particular opinion (as it's an opinion and meaningful to the person who wrote it), I personally don't agree with it (and that's ok as we're all different).

 

I honestly think that they are both strong programs. Good luck with your decision. :)

 

But it is true that if you do more than the worksheets, it comes from you and not from the material, correct? I'm asking this respectfully because maybe I'm missing something in MM.

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If you wait until you actually get to your jumping point in RS C, you might be lucky and find a new math curriculum has come out. Or you'll discover you're pregnant and other criteria are driving your decision. Or... :)

 

In our house, MM has turned out to be quite good. It gets done, which is a virtue. Dd has no trouble with the CWP stuff I've been throwing at her, another good thing. But the main thing is, it gets done. If you get Singapore done, you'll be happy. If you get MM done, you'll be happy. If you don't get math done, you won't be happy. Plain and simple.

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But it is true that if you do more than the worksheets, it comes from you and not from the material, correct? I'm asking this respectfully because maybe I'm missing something in MM.

 

Well, there are "helpful resources" lists at the beginning of every chapter (but I have never used any of those to be honest). I'm guessing that some people do.

 

I suppose that for me personally, the answer to your question is yes, with a qualifying statement. To me, the explanations in the worktexts are very thorough, so because of who I am, the extra that I do is an extension of the program that makes sense to me. I'm not sure if I'm making myself clear there. I know what I want to say, but not sure I'm getting it out right. :tongue_smilie: I don't need to go to any other source to figure out how to make math meaningful to my kids.

 

Math does come naturally to me, and because of where I am in my life right now, extending the lessons doesn't seem like I'm doing anything extra (but maybe I am?). I guess I don't know whether or not someone who is not strong in math could make that same natural extension as that's not who I am. To me, again, it just seems natural, so in my head anyone can do it. :tongue_smilie:

 

On the flip side, I suppose not everyone is looking to make those extensions as needed/desired on their own. The program is a strong program as written in my opinion.

 

Anyway, I really don't think I'm being very clear here so I apologize. It's nice that there are so many choices out there!

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Well, there are "helpful resources" lists at the beginning of every chapter (but I have never used any of those to be honest). I'm guessing that some people do.

 

I suppose that for me personally, the answer to your question is yes, with a qualifying statement. To me, the explanations in the worktexts are very thorough, so because of who I am, the extra that I do is an extension of the program that makes sense to me. I'm not sure if I'm making myself clear there. I know what I want to say, but not sure I'm getting it out right. :tongue_smilie: I don't need to go to any other source to figure out how to make math meaningful to my kids.

 

Math does come naturally to me, and because of where I am in my life right now, extending the lessons doesn't seem like I'm doing anything extra (but maybe I am?). I guess I don't know whether or not someone who is not strong in math could make that same natural extension as that's not who I am. To me, again, it just seems natural, so in my head anyone can do it. :tongue_smilie:

 

On the flip side, I suppose not everyone is looking to make those extensions as needed/desired on their own. The program is a strong program as written in my opinion.

 

Anyway, I really don't think I'm being very clear here so I apologize. It's nice that there are so many choices out there!

I think you made plenty of sense. And I'm :lurk5: enjoying this thread. Carry on...

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MM also has the "Make It Real" topical books that have a lot of extra word problems and real life problems to supplement the basic curriculum. I'm planning on getting the addition and fraction ones soon to use this summer. I'm not sure how it compares to the Singapore stuff because the idea of juggling all those books makes my head spin. I never looked too far into Singapore once I saw how involved it seemed, but the Make It Real books are additional MM resources you could pick up and integrate into your schedule.

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So please, MM users, tell me to stop reading these threads and that you love MM and it has tons of instruction. Either that or talk me out of buying it and into Singapore. Just whatever you do, don't make me decide on my own, now that you've tripped me all up again. That would be wrong. :lol:

 

Stop reading these threads, we love MM, it has tons of instructions. :lol:

 

That wasn't helpful, but I just couldn't help myself! I've never used SM, but we switched to MM this year and do like it. I look at what the lesson is on the computer and teach it with manipulatives usually, then have the practice pages printed out and DS10 works through those problems on his own. I don't think he would do as well if I just printed everything off and handed it to him.

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Well, there are "helpful resources" lists at the beginning of every chapter (but I have never used any of those to be honest). I'm guessing that some people do.

 

I suppose that for me personally, the answer to your question is yes, with a qualifying statement. To me, the explanations in the worktexts are very thorough, so because of who I am, the extra that I do is an extension of the program that makes sense to me. I'm not sure if I'm making myself clear there. I know what I want to say, but not sure I'm getting it out right. :tongue_smilie: I don't need to go to any other source to figure out how to make math meaningful to my kids.

 

Math does come naturally to me, and because of where I am in my life right now, extending the lessons doesn't seem like I'm doing anything extra (but maybe I am?). I guess I don't know whether or not someone who is not strong in math could make that same natural extension as that's not who I am. To me, again, it just seems natural, so in my head anyone can do it. :tongue_smilie:

 

On the flip side, I suppose not everyone is looking to make those extensions as needed/desired on their own. The program is a strong program as written in my opinion.

 

Anyway, I really don't think I'm being very clear here so I apologize. It's nice that there are so many choices out there!

 

 

Great post! I agree that MM is a wonderful, strong program even if you're just doing what's written on the worksheets. I also agree that it is easy to extend using the resources listed, or by just living with math (what we do... math is something discussed all the time here, not just as part of a math 'lesson'), or even by using a second math program. But I don't think it's necessary to do extras in order to make the program complete. (We've gone through 1a-3b.)

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But it is true that if you do more than the worksheets, it comes from you and not from the material, correct? I'm asking this respectfully because maybe I'm missing something in MM.

 

 

I think that some of the instruction my actually be built into how the problems are arranged. It is true that the actual instruction at the top of the worksheets is minimal....I supplement with manipulatives and white board instruction as needed.

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We've done 1A, 1B, and just started 2A. Some of that we were flying through, just getting some foundations laid because DS was ready for the next level, but when we've hit something new (like regrouping in 1B), the explanation was pretty clear for us. I *did* pull out base 10 blocks for that lesson, but that's something that's easy to do without being told you have to do it. My son usually doesn't need manipulatives, so I prefer this way. I will pull them out IF he needs them, but if he gets it just from the pictures, there's no need to pull out manipulatives. I think it'd be very easy to teach MM just like SM + HIG was explained. If there are pictures of base 10 blocks on the MM page, I think it's safe to assume that pulling out base 10 blocks would be a good idea if you need a manipulative. MM also teaches how to use an abacus at the beginning of 1B, so that's another manipulative you can pull in if you want.

 

I do sit down and teach my son the concepts. We go over them, and I make sure he understands them before I let him do his work. The nice thing is that we have just the worktext in front of us. I don't have to go to a gazillion different books. So it's easier for me to teach. So far, the explanations have been excellent for us. My son enjoys math and is learning new things (which he wasn't in Saxon :tongue_smilie:).

 

I think MM vs SM is just a question of which one YOU like better. They're both excellent programs. They both prepare a child for upper level math very well. They both teach mental math the "Asian way". The scope and sequence is a bit different (like multiplication in SM 1B vs MM 2B), but they get to the same spot by the end. You shouldn't find yourself "behind" with either program.

 

And while you're reading threads about MM not teaching enough, make sure you also read the threads where people talk about SM expecting kids to make conceptual leaps sometimes without teaching them all the steps. I've seen that mentioned a lot (though I don't know if those people were using the HIGs or not). There are pros and cons to every program, and no program works for every child. Give MM a try (it's certainly inexpensive!), and if you don't like it, switch to SM.

 

Since I started homeschooling, I've changed several subjects... spelling (twice!), reading, grammar, science, and next year I'm changing history and handwriting. You know what I have had no need to switch from? Math. We've both been very happy with MM (which I started using when I was afterschooling). We usually do a couple pages a day. Sometimes we'll just do 1. I look at the problems on the page and take into account other factors as well (like last week was our first week back after a week long break, so I assigned just one page of math to ease us back into things). Some concepts are easy and we can get 3 pages done. Since we're working ahead in math, I'm not too worried about how many pages per day we do. We take however long we need on a topic. MM was super easy to accelerate when we were going through 1A/1B. Now we're doing 2A as written. I was impressed that the "review" was not easy stuff, but it actually was a little more challenging than anything he had in 1A/1B. It used concepts learned in that level, but bumped the difficulty up a notch. Very cool. :)

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We have both. We've been doing Math Mammoth for quite some time and it doesn't thrill either my daughter or me at all. Please take into consideration that math is a subject where both my daughter prefers more interaction and more hands-on, as well as I enjoy teaching it. We keep doing MM because it's *cheap* and *easy* and one day I think I'll magically discover what it is that makes everyone love it so. I don't think I will. I haven't seen my daughter pick up any new skills. She just gets this glaze in her eye as she mind-numbingly does the worksheets, she's been doing 2 per day. We do look at the extra links suggested. The only reason I like MM is because it is cheap, easy, and quick. Do I want to value those qualities to teach my daughter math, one of the most important subjects? No.

 

I'm sure other families find value in it more than we do though. I can see it doing the job, but I want to be using something that does a better job for us.

 

Now Singapore, we only started this weekend, but I have read the entire 1B Textbook and HIG. That is a program I love! Perfect amount of parent instruction - not too much, not too little. I can tell immediately that my daughter is going to learn tons.

 

For our particular family, Singapore wins, hands down. I was all set to order the 6-year Math Mammoth for just $75, which is totally dirt cheap (for SIX years!), but now I'm thinking I may not do that. I'll just invest in the Singapore books.

 

Again, take into consideration both my daughter and my learning/teaching styles and then you'll understand why we prefer Singapore or RightStart math.

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Re-reading this whole thread through, I'm wondering if I should have been using Grade 2 Math Mammoth. 1A/B is just way too easy, especially after having gone through RS A and half of B.

 

Anyway, for the price, I just decided I'll for sure get the whole 6 years of MM. Maybe in a harder level I'll see what makes MM click for so many people.

 

One very good thing about MM - it gets done. No matter if mama is sick, or you're on the road, it's easy to do Math Mammoth.

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We LOVED MM. dd was way behind in Math partly because she didn't like it and partly because she didn't get it. She could manipulate the symbols if I reminded her what to do but there was very little concrete understanding of what she was doing. So we tried all sorts of Math programs (A Beka, Math-U-See, Saxon) and although I am a certified Math teacher, I wasn't able to help a whole lot. We found MM and she began in Grade 2 to begin at the beginning (she was 11) and kept on progressing. I liked that it was short and sweet. Gave her the explanations she needed for that level, for those problems. I did a lot of Math with her and as a result she learned her basics and is now doing 7th grade Math! I am most thankful to MM for its straightforward, "Let's not make it complicated" approach.

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We just switched to MM at the beginning of last month and we love it! We had been using MUS, which is a good program, just didn't work for us. Anyway, ds is in 5A & dd is in 2A. They are both doing 3 pages per day and we have only had to back up once for a day to go over the topic that ds missed the first time (this was due to an incredibly stubborn, independent ds that absolutely refuses to ask for help!:banghead: We're working on that issue but it has nothing to do w/ math. Anyway, I went back over the instructions with him and had him read them orally and he got it!). So all I can give you from our short time w/ MM is good reviews! Cheap!!! Easy to use, my kids like it, mom likes it, so we're sticking with it! Cant wait for the group buy next month!!! Everybody buy so we can get the 40% off!!!:tongue_smilie:

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Well, there are "helpful resources" lists at the beginning of every chapter (but I have never used any of those to be honest). I'm guessing that some people do.

 

 

I DID use the resources at the beginning of the chapter and I did use the supplementary materials (they come with the level you order. With the latter, you can change the numbers and make up new worksheets.) The resources at the beginning of each chapter were good if you needed something else that was a little different (perhaps a different approach) on the same topic. Both were good and helpful. I didn't use them all the time, only when my dd needed something additional. Math comes very easily to me but not to my daughter so I found these good to have, to help her to understand or to reinforce concepts that were introduced.

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I switched from RS to MM this year. I find MM to be very straightforward, and that is why I like it. I do feel that the instruction is succinct and clear, so there doesn't need to be a whole lot of it. If my kids don't get the concept from the instructions (rare), I can expand upon it myself.

 

I do remember commenting to a friend who switched from RS to MM at the same time I did that I didn't feel like I was teaching math anymore, which was kinda weird for me. It took me a while to get used to the idea that I was in the room with the kids while they worked on math but not actively teaching a lesson. I answer some questions for my dd9; she mostly works independently. I read through the lessons and do more guided problems with my ds8. I am definitely involved in the lesson, but I feel that the book is doing the teaching and I am there to assist. For me, although it felt weird at first, this is a plus for MM because math with RS was taking over our lives. It took way too long to get two RS lessons, at two different levels, done every day. Now my kids work on math at the same time, and they get more done in 1/2 an hour of MM than they ever did in 45 minutes-1 hour of RS.

 

Both my kids like MM, and they are learning new concepts more quickly than they did in RS, and there is more practice with each skill. MM is a hit here!

 

Tara

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I prefer the more challenging questions of Singapore Math, especially the IP and the CWP. However, I've found there were some areas where my 3rd graders needed more foundation work and more practice, and I purchased the Math Mammoth Geometry worktexts for Grades 1-5 to supplement our Singapore Math curriculum.

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We are on the brink of switching from RS A to MM. I tried the free print outs and DD enjoyed them. RS is definitely a great program but I don't think it's a good fit for my DD. I do think she'd do better with a mastery program plus the table top work/reading the directions to herself (I was obviously there to help when needed) really helped her focus. She was always so squirmy during many of the RS lessons. So, at least for us, I think her focusing on the instructions herself, visually, really helps a lot.

 

Good luck figuring it out!

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With Math Mammoth, you're basically handing the child a worksheet, reading instructions and they do the work.

 

While you certainly could use it that way, we do not. I sit with my kids and read the instructions, explain the instructions, walk through the examples, use manipulatives to further explain the ideas, and make sure they understand before they do the practice problems. I do this with extremely little effort and find it to be very effective. I never seriously considered Singapore because it has multiple books per level and just looks complicated to use. I have five kids and I need to keep things simple.

 

With MM we do however many pages makes sense for the day. Because it is just one book, we simply do the next couple of pages. We move more quickly when a concept comes easily and we slow down when a concept is more difficult.

 

I like MM, and I think it's a good product. I think it just depends more on your style and what you want out of it.

 

This is true of any program. :) BTW, we use PR as well.

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My twins couldn't stand MM, but have no problems with SM. My younger son will do anything math related and is doing SM, MM, Kumon, anything he can get his hands on for fun. I enjoy teaching SM over MM, I need more direction. I think it really depends on your teaching style and the individual student. :)

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I too am planning to switch my ds10 from RS to MM asap..We have been using RS C & D. But I plan to keep my DS9 with RS because he reading is below level, he needs more instruction, and I already have it. But as soon as he can I plan to use MM for him too. The independent learning of MM is a big attraction for me! After reading about MM I was so excited. If they need extra instruction on a particularly topic, I feel that this can be easily done. I can't wait to get it!

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I prefer the more challenging questions of Singapore Math, especially the IP and the CWP.

 

This is why I've chosen to keep Singapore as "spine" for my oldest. If Maria Miller added an enrichment book that was similar to IP and CWP, I would switch in a heartbeat.

 

And while you're reading threads about MM not teaching enough, make sure you also read the threads where people talk about SM expecting kids to make conceptual leaps sometimes without teaching them all the steps. I've seen that mentioned a lot (though I don't know if those people were using the HIGs or not).

 

I do use the Singapore HIG's but still think MM does a superior job at walking the child through the concepts step-by-step-by-step. With tricky concepts (multi-digit multiplication, long division, fractions), I have my DD work through the MM single-topic "blue" worktext first before going through the chapter in Singapore. Maria Miller's explanations help her understand the math in a way that I can't even with the assistance of the Singapore HIG's.

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Re-reading this whole thread through, I'm wondering if I should have been using Grade 2 Math Mammoth. 1A/B is just way too easy, especially after having gone through RS A and half of B.

 

Yeah, I can see MM 1 being too easy after doing much of RS B.

 

DS started MM 1A while still in school doing Saxon 1. We actually skipped some sections in 1A because we just didn't need them - they're mostly addition/subtraction facts, which he'd been drilling in Saxon. We skipped time, shapes, and money in 1B because he'd had plenty of those in Saxon at school too. He'll hit them again in the grade 2 book (I still had him take the chapter tests and the end of year test in grade 1, even if we skipped something). We made sure we did ALL of chapter 7 in 1B, since that teaches regrouping and focuses a lot on making tens. I think that was the best chapter of grade 1. :)

 

I'm *really* liking the grade 2 text so far, and we've only gone through a few sections of chapter 1.

 

Don't be afraid to skip things, cross out problems (Maria Miller says it's fine to do just 1/2 the problems if there are a lot of problems on the page), use manipulatives, etc. We have often done just half the problems if we were breezing through a topic he had been introduced to before. I always have him do ALL the word problems though, which he doesn't mind. He is good at word problems. I just have to work on getting him to show his work. He does everything in his head (very mental math oriented child).

 

I'm doing RS A with my middle son right now (very slowly), and I'm not sure yet if we'll do RS B or just go straight to MM 1. I guess it will partly depend on how his writing is and how much he needs manipulatives. My oldest doesn't need manipulatives very often, though he wouldn't have been able to handle the writing in MM 1 any earlier than first grade (he could have handled the math easily in K). Middle son actually gets to work ahead a bit like oldest should have, so we may very well be hitting MM 1 in K, but his fine motor skills are much better, so we'll see.

 

I've looked at SM a million times, and just haven't seen anything in the samples that MM doesn't do. The layout of SM is certainly more appealing, but since my DS is fine with the MM layout, I'm not fixing what isn't broken. Plus, the multiple books vs. 1 student worktext is a biggie for me. I'll eventually have 3 kids to school, and even with just one and littles running around, I prefer dealing with just one book. Actually, I print the pages and stick them in each day's folder, so in one day, I pull out 2 pieces of paper and that's it!

 

But again, both programs are excellent. Do whichever one you and your kid(s) prefer - whichever one gets done regularly. :)

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I agonized over this about a year ago or so as well. I really think the only way to know is to get one half level of SM and one half level of MM. Try them both and see which you like. That was the only way I could settle it for myself. It turns out that I really do like both for reasons already stated, and we use both. If you're a multi curricula user like many of us, you'll probably end up using both too. :lol:

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(Maria Miller says it's fine to do just 1/2 the problems if there are a lot of problems on the page)

 

Does anyone happen to have a link to this? I read it before more than once myself, but I can't find it on the MM site - maybe in her blog? I need the link for one of my kids' teachers (long story ;) - trying to get a school to consider MM).

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Thank you, everyone! I believe you are absolutely right, Cindyz, that I will just have to get both. I'll get all of MM in the sale, because that's too good to miss, and get maybe 2a of Singapore. I already have the CWP 1 and we will use CWP no matter what main program we use. I feel much better now...although I somehow just got sucked into spending more money and buying even more curriculum. :001_huh::lol:

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Does anyone happen to have a link to this? I read it before more than once myself, but I can't find it on the MM site - maybe in her blog? I need the link for one of my kids' teachers (long story ;) - trying to get a school to consider MM).

 

It's in the user's guide when you purchase the program:

 

When you have a page or two filled with lots of similar practice problems ("drill") or large sets of problems, feel free to only assign 1/2 or 2/3 of those problems. If your child "gets it" with less amount of exercises, then that is perfect! If not, you can always assign him/her the rest of the problems some other day. In fact, you could even use these unassigned problems the next week or next month for some additional review.

 

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It's in the user's guide when you purchase the program:

 

Thank you!!! I knew I read it someplace in her own words, but I had never looked at the user guide before (I have Light Blue). I hadn't even noticed that there was a user guide :lol:. But now I see it there in the folder.

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Thank you, everyone! I believe you are absolutely right, Cindyz, that I will just have to get both. I'll get all of MM in the sale, because that's too good to miss, and get maybe 2a of Singapore. I already have the CWP 1 and we will use CWP no matter what main program we use. I feel much better now...although I somehow just got sucked into spending more money and buying even more curriculum. :001_huh::lol:

 

This is exactly the decision I have come to after reading all the replies and other threads discussing MM and SM.... of course, the large discount on MM this month is a great incentive as well.

 

This seems intuitive, but I thought I'd ask anyway- if I end up deciding to use MM as the supplement and not the spine, I assume the light blue series would work just as well as the blue for that purpose?

 

(*end mini-hijack*)

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This seems intuitive, but I thought I'd ask anyway- if I end up deciding to use MM as the supplement and not the spine, I assume the light blue series would work just as well as the blue for that purpose?

 

 

I think it'd work fine that way if you have the whole series (grade 1-6). You'd just have to jump ahead in MM a bit when doing some of SM where the scope & sequence is different. For example, if you want to supplement SM 1B's multiplication introduction, you'd need to use MM 2B for that. The topics are by chapter though, so for example, 1A starts out with addition 0-10, then the next chapter is subtraction 0-10, then the next chapter shows the relationship between addition and subtraction. So it'd be easy to see where you'd go in MM to supplement, I think.

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We have both. We've been doing Math Mammoth for quite some time and it doesn't thrill either my daughter or me at all. Please take into consideration that math is a subject where both my daughter prefers more interaction and more hands-on, as well as I enjoy teaching it. We keep doing MM because it's *cheap* and *easy* and one day I think I'll magically discover what it is that makes everyone love it so. I don't think I will. I haven't seen my daughter pick up any new skills. She just gets this glaze in her eye as she mind-numbingly does the worksheets, she's been doing 2 per day. We do look at the extra links suggested. The only reason I like MM is because it is cheap, easy, and quick. Do I want to value those qualities to teach my daughter math, one of the most important subjects? No.

 

I'm sure other families find value in it more than we do though. I can see it doing the job, but I want to be using something that does a better job for us.

 

Now Singapore, we only started this weekend, but I have read the entire 1B Textbook and HIG. That is a program I love! Perfect amount of parent instruction - not too much, not too little. I can tell immediately that my daughter is going to learn tons.

 

For our particular family, Singapore wins, hands down. I was all set to order the 6-year Math Mammoth for just $75, which is totally dirt cheap (for SIX years!), but now I'm thinking I may not do that. I'll just invest in the Singapore books.

 

Again, take into consideration both my daughter and my learning/teaching styles and then you'll understand why we prefer Singapore or RightStart math.

 

 

I don't know how to quote a partial post but where were you going to order MM for $75?

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I too agonized over MM and SM. We had done SM Earlybird and then MEP while I tried to decide. I ended up going with MM for 1A and B. But after a while I found like a PP mentioned that it was like giving my child a page to get done. Now, he didn't have any problem necessarily doing it after we read the instructions. And if you are short on time, don't like to teach, or naturally good at finding ways to explain or make math hands-on then I think you'll like it.

I found I missed the hands-on and teacher interaction. I want to learn how to do math the "Asian" way right along with my son. And I need a bit more hand-holding than MM gives me. I took a longer look at SM, ordered 1A materials and after looking at it today- it's what I want. Since I have MM I will supplement with it as needed. Now, I haven't looked at the higher grades and I am sure instruction is different. If he were older and/or I didn't have as much time to do math with him then I would rely more on MM.

 

I also agree with others that it depends on learning style and teaching style. MM is pretty straightforward, but I wanted more meat for me and more teacher direction/interaction.

 

Also, after looking through the HIG, Textbook, and Workbook- I can see that it's doesn't always mean flipping through all of them. I can read through the HIG once or twice while my ds is writing or taking a snack break. I get my ideas, understand what I am trying to teach and ways to teach it, what I need to do in the textbook and workbook- and then just use the other two books. It's not as cumbersome as I thought it would be. But then, it is only Year 1.

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This is why I've chosen to keep Singapore as "spine" for my oldest. If Maria Miller added an enrichment book that was similar to IP and CWP, I would switch in a heartbeat.

 

.

 

I haven't looked at my MM books lately but I do believe in the 3rd or 4th level Maria Miller does suggest one use Singapore CWP. She gave several options but CWP was one of them.

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I was also thinking about all of this more and, for right now at least, we're still going to be using Rightstart, so I don't need any long lessons or long-winded explanations for anything unless or until we drop RS. I have RS for that. I'm still going to order both, because for all I know we may hate C and drop RS sooner than I thought, or even if we don't, I'd like to have this decision made before I absolutely need to know which one to will be better for us. Oh, and thanks to the pp who bumped up that other thread. I'd read it when there were only 4 or 5 pages. I didn't know there were more. :)

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For my son, if he didn't get the steps to long division the first 3 times, he won't get it presented in almost the same way a fourth time.
Wow, we haven't gotten to division, but so far MM has presented everything in several different ways. We are halfway through 3A.

 

I have not seen Singapore, and those threads had me second guessing myself on MM as well... but I did try the Kahn Academy videos that go with the Singapore lessons. DD didn't like them. I didn't see them presenting anything differently or better than MM, and based on those videos, I definitely didn't see Singapore as more advanced than MM.

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With Math Mammoth, you're basically handing the child a worksheet, reading instructions and they do the work.

 

I disagree that this is how MM is intended to be used. I think that Math Mammoth does need to be actively taught AND the author expects the homeschool teacher to actively teach it. If you just hand your child the workbook, you will likely not have good results. If you need lots of guidance on how to teach, another program may work better for you. I admit that I am a mathy person and have been through education classes and have had teacher training, and I like Math Mammoth because I don't have to consult a teacher's manual, rather I use the instruction in the book as a jumping off point for teaching the material. I understand why someone who liked more specific suggestions for teaching would want to use another program.

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