Jump to content

Menu

Gluttony -- a Forgotten Sin?


Recommended Posts

I do not mean to start a war on this. . . Please don't take offense, as none is intended.

 

I just thought there would be a wide variety of informed opinions here, and I really am interested.

 

Do any churches today actually discuss the sin of gluttony today? Have you personally ever heard a sermon on it?

 

If not, do you wonder: why not?

 

I am beginning to believe that gluttony is probably the most dangerous sin in America today. Destroying more families & lives than any other.

 

I am wondering if all (??) churches and pastors avoid teaching about this sin because they are:

 

1) gluttonous themselves & resistant to changing

2) don't believe gluttony is actually a sin

3) are afraid of alienating their followers

 

I wonder if reintroducing morality into our choices about food might empower some people to overcome their slavery to food. I am wondering if/how churches might involve themselves in this topic without alienating their members.

 

If you do believe gluttony is a sin, then how do you personally define it?

 

TIA

Link to comment
Share on other sites

YES! and as someone who learned since early childhood to cope with sexual, physical and emotional abuse by comfort eating, it took me a LONG time to come around to the idea that it IS a sin! this is compounded by the attitude our culture has (prejudice against overweight is the ONE acceptable prejudice) and its all about self gratification, NOT being a Godly person, so most people have VERY wrong motives around losing weight and their attitude toward overweight people. At any rate i am taking "the Lord's Table" class at http://www.settingcaptivesfree.com and its been a life changer. I highly recommend that anyone who is Christian and struggles with eating check it out!

 

Now, this is all referring to people of faith, people NOT of the Christian faith don't have to abide by our rules so that's another issue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The food supply has changed and been radically altered since biblical times. In fact, if you read and believe certain research, biblical times is when some significant (and not good) changes were initiating.

 

Gluttony, as mentioned in the Bible, is not the same *chemical* and *biological* function that happens today.

 

Our food supply and eating pattern has created the obesity and overweight problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Do any churches today actually discuss the sin of gluttony today?

I know mine doesn't and other churches we have been to didn't.

Have you personally ever heard a sermon on it?

NOPE

If not, do you wonder: why not?

I think its because they do not want to cause a war among the congregation. Small church and big church avoid this topic! We have been to both sizes of church.

I am beginning to believe that gluttony is probably the most dangerous sin in America today. Destroying more families & lives than any other.

 

 

I totally agree with you!! Hubby considers it a sin and can't believe how many overweight preachers we have here in this country. Look at the Sunday after church dinner....which table is full of stuff (the veggies/meat or desert??? Yep desert!!!

I am wondering if all (??) churches and pastors avoid teaching about this sin because they are:

 

1) gluttonous themselves & resistant to changing DITTO!!!!

2) don't believe gluttony is actually a sinDitto!!!!!

3) are afraid of alienating their followers DITTO

 

I wonder if reintroducing morality into our choices about food might empower some people to overcome their slavery to food. I am wondering if/how churches might involve themselves in this topic without alienating their members.

No idea! They do need to get serious about this

If you do believe gluttony is a sin, then how do you personally define it?

I believe its a sin because scriptures says so. You are harming your temple. Smoking is not mentioned in the Bible however Gluttony is....Yet sermons are preached againsst smoking not gluttony.

TIA

 

That is my thoughts...May have more tomorrow. TIRED:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our pastor occasionally mentions that he has problems with gluttony. I'm not sure exactly how he refers to it, but he admits he likes to eat........................

 

I have to watch it. I love to eat. And now that I'm not 18 anymore you can tell.

 

I know, i've heard pastors joke about that too, but it is a REAL sin! and as a Bible believing Christian for quite some time, i only recently discovered that!! but i think about it now and think, would you ever hear a pastor on the pulpit joke around about how he has issues with fooling around with women other than his wife or something... not going to happen! becuase most people don't think its REAL!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My exFIL (preacher and evangelist) and my exH (ex-preacher) both are very large and often preached and judged SO much on other people and their sins of cigarettes, a divorce, having an alcoholoic drink at a meal, etc. Judge, gossip and disapprove of everything with such high and haughty attitude while being tremendously overweight. They never saw it. In those lives (because the situation is personal to me) it infuriates me.

 

I'll stop there before.... Well, just before. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe its a sin. I walked the track Tues. night and started talking with this couple about loosing weight, eating healthy and all that stuff.

 

I had mention how the church centers every activity around food. The congregations are getting heavier. I even mention that pastor needed to set the example and preach in reference to the Scripture.

 

“Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; you were bought at a price. Therefore, honor God with your body.†~ 1 Corinthians 6: 19

 

Well we had a great 45 min walk/talk and at the end the gentleman thanked me and praised me and said he needed the "preaching". I was really surprised when he told me his name and where he preached:tongue_smilier: He was a minister at one of the "BIG" churches in the area. He is overweight and his wife had begged him to walk with her that night.

 

So anyway it is an issue and I am a Jesus girl that "got on her soap box" and maybe made difference to a congregation. I have always been about health. I am a nurse and try to be helpful with people with weight issues. I understand about eating disorder and emotional eating but honestly most of the people just really like food.

 

I have worked ER rooms for years and honesty all the local "all you can eat" restaurants, we call them "heart attack buffets" because we have so many that have heart attacks at the restaurant or right after visiting the restaurant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do any churches today actually discuss the sin of gluttony today? Have you personally ever heard a sermon on it?

 

Yes, it is regularily included when other addiction sins are mentioned. My current pastor is a recovering alcoholic. He mentions addictions often.

 

I am beginning to believe that gluttony is probably the most dangerous sin in America today. Destroying more families & lives than any other.

 

Going a bit too far here, I think. Gluttony probably sadly shortens the lives of many people by a bit, but "destryong more families & lives then any other?" I hardly think so. Gluttons don't usually steel to support their gluttony, or become intoxicated and crash their car, or neglect their children because they're in a drug induced "coma," or loose their job because they couldn't make it to work. The homeless shelters are not full with gluttons nor are the jails. Surely, gluttony causes one's life to be less then ideal and harms one's health, but I wouldn't call it equal in any respect to the devastation of an addiction to alcohol or drugs. I'm not in any way saying they are worse sins then gluttony. Just saying that the harm gluttony causes to our cumulative society IMO, does not compare to that of drug or alcohol addiction. And think of the vast devastation, destroyed marriages and crushed spirits caused by sexual sins: pornography, prostituion, human trafficking, child sexual abuse. There's simply no comparison.

 

I am shamed to admit that though I am a Christian, I am also an practicing glutton. I have been, on and off, for 30 years. I do believe my Christian walk and testimony have been negatively effected by this sin. But.....I have been happily married for 27 years and have raised 4 wonderful children. I've had a happy, glorious and blessed life (though imperfect). My life and my children's lives are by no means "destroyed." In addition, I know many other gluttons. The same is true for them.

 

I am wondering if all (??) churches and pastors avoid teaching about this sin because they are:

 

1) gluttonous themselves & resistant to changing

 

One of my previous pastors was a glutton. He was one of the most wonderful, spiritual, real, people I've ever known. He had his masters in psychology and a Phd in theology. He did admit his sin and struggle to overcome it. He never quite succeeded but never made excuses. But the good he did through out his life far, far, surpassed any negativity that this problem may have caused him or anyone else. He is a genius and one of the best speakers I've ever heard. His sermons helped me more, spiritually, then I can possibly say.

 

2) don't believe gluttony is actually a sin

 

I don't know any Christians who don't think that gluttony is a sin.

 

3) are afraid of alienating their followers

 

I am sure there are many pastors who don't mention lots of sins at the pulpit for this reason.

 

I wonder if reintroducing morality into our choices about food might empower some people to overcome their slavery to food.

 

Yes, I think it would. Gluttony is a terrible thing, as are all sins. It can cause spiritual, emotional and physical pain and it is a sin that should not be downplayed or ignored.

 

If you do believe gluttony is a sin, then how do you personally define it?

TIA

 

Regularily eating when you're not hungry for reasons other then hunger. Eating more then your body needs to the point of becoming overweight and unhealthy. Regularily and intentionally eating things you KNOW are bad for you. Regularily overeating till you are uncomfortably full. Especially relying on food as a means of self satisfying and/ or a comfort mechanism while at the same time NOT turning to God for comfort and fullfillment.

Edited by katemary63
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The food supply has changed and been radically altered since biblical times. In fact, if you read and believe certain research, biblical times is when some significant (and not good) changes were initiating.

 

Gluttony, as mentioned in the Bible, is not the same *chemical* and *biological* function that happens today.

 

Our food supply and eating pattern has created the obesity and overweight problem.

 

Could we explore this idea some more?

 

Joanne, are you saying that chemicals are causing obesity? Causing food addiction? Causing false hunger? What signifcant changes were starting?

 

I am fascinated by this as I wonder how processed foods play into weight issues, health issues, hunger issues, etc. Like, if one is hungry and grabs a donut, does it cause them to be hungrier quicker than grabbing a hard boiled egg? The caloric impact is obviously greater, even though in both cases, the person is only eating one food item, and eating it out of hunger. ::think::

 

IOW, if we went to a diet that didn't consist of processed foods and ate organically grown and nurtured foods, would issues with obesity still be so great?

 

Is gluttony eating foods that are bad for you, even if you aren't overweight? Is it eating any kind of food in excess, when you aren't hungry? Is it both?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have been to a lot of different churches through our moves.

 

We have only heard one full sermon on it, at a previous church. Our current church does mention it in passing from time to time.

 

Most churches we have attended do avoid the issue, although they have preached on some other tough issues that are not popular to talk about.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My previous pastor did preach and teach about it, including it as a sin, but he was an awesome expository line-by-line preacher/teacher whom I miss terribly! If it's in the Bible, he taught about it!

 

I think many pastors shy away from it because it is such a sensitive subject (read: not PC) and being overweight and overeating are not as damaging to relationships (as the PP mentioned), as say, alcoholism or smoking or drugs or p*rn. Although it can be as damaging to one's health.

 

Still, it is a sin. And should be treated as such. It's a symptom of being out of control and having an intense self-focus, just like other indulgences and addictions are.

 

Interesting discussion, as always. :001_smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had mention how the church centers every activity around food. The congregations are getting heavier.

 

 

:iagree: I've also been noticing that everything is always 'feast' and 'treat' food. It's getting to where in order to show up at any event you 'must' bring a goodie.

 

I've known churches that intentionally had simple/healthful meals with an emphasis on fellowship. It was wonderful.

 

 

Still, it is a sin. And should be treated as such. It's a symptom of being out of control and having an intense self-focus, just like other indulgences and addictions are.

:

 

Well said. It does seem that gluttony can be about more that just food.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Could we explore this idea some more?

 

Joanne, are you saying that chemicals are causing obesity? Causing food addiction? Causing false hunger? What signifcant changes were starting?

 

I am fascinated by this as I wonder how processed foods play into weight issues, health issues, hunger issues, etc. Like, if one is hungry and grabs a donut, does it cause them to be hungrier quicker than grabbing a hard boiled egg? The caloric impact is obviously greater, even though in both cases, the person is only eating one food item, and eating it out of hunger. ::think::

 

IOW, if we went to a diet that didn't consist of processed foods and ate organically grown and nurtured foods, would issues with obesity still be so great?

 

 

 

Better Homes and Gardens has an article about this very issue in their latest issue (sorry, I couldn't find it on line).

 

"Once you start eating a highly processed food, you might find it tough to stop. Here's why.

 

1. It's super-easy to eat. With no bones, pits, or clumsy shapes to interfere, processed foods are an object lesson in instant gratification.

 

2. The texture tantalizes. Processed foods are engineered for optimal mouthfeel--whether crunchy, creamy, or gooey. These fun to eat qualities can quickly override your better judgment.

 

3. Flavors hit full-force. Health-sapping sugar, salt, and fat--plus additives such as hydrolyzed vegetable protein--ratchet up taste far beyond what you'd find in nature..."

 

David Kessler, author of The End of Overeating: Taking Control of the Insatiable American Appetite and former commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, goes on to add, " The real problem is that certain commercially made foods--the ones with tons of added sugar, salt,and fat--are so tasty and so stimulating that they actually overwhelm the brain's circuitry. When we eat them, the brain cranks out dopamine, a neurochemical associated with a reward that drives us to eat that food again...and again...and again."

 

I have noticed that people who eat mostly processed foods, find home-made cooking to be "tasteless."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, gluttony is a sin. But it can be a trap to think that you can identify when someone is indulging in that sin currently. Problems with hormones, thyroid etc. can make weight gain easy and weight loss difficult. Many people have listened to wrong information and have gotten heavier.

 

Once again, I agree with Jean!! Very succinctly put!

 

Anne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are a lot of heavy women in the local Christian homeschooling group in my town in America. I can't imagine ever saying anything about it to any of them, and I bet their ministers feel the same way. I certainly wouldn't want to put a "sin" twist on it, as I'm sure they already feel bad.

 

From what I've read, there are 3 main ways to lose weight: 1) portion control, 2) low-carb, or 3) low-fat. I doubt the ministers want to get involved in a 3-way war.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I have heard this spoken from the pulpit in more than one church. We have mostly attended churches that practice expository preaching, so it is mentioned when it comes up in the Scriptures. That is one of the things that I love about expository preaching - you can't skip the parts you think the congregation doesn't want to hear.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I have heard this spoken from the pulpit in more than one church. We have mostly attended churches that practice expository preaching, so it is mentioned when it comes up in the Scriptures. That is one of the things that I love about expository preaching - you can't skip the parts you think the congregation doesn't want to hear.

 

Love expository preaching.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, gluttony is a sin. But it can be a trap to think that you can identify when someone is indulging in that sin currently. Problems with hormones, thyroid etc. can make weight gain easy and weight loss difficult. Many people have listened to wrong information and have gotten heavier.

 

:iagree:

Absolutely. Very, very good point, Jean.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There seems to be an assumption that overweight = glutton and thin/fit = non-glutton that I think one has to be careful about. You can have thin people who binge, overeat, make food an idol just as you can have overweight people with a right relationship toward food.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know, i've heard pastors joke about that too, but it is a REAL sin! and as a Bible believing Christian for quite some time, i only recently discovered that!! but i think about it now and think, would you ever hear a pastor on the pulpit joke around about how he has issues with fooling around with women other than his wife or something... not going to happen! becuase most people don't think its REAL!

 

He's far from joking about it, he's serious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So where does the Bible talk about gluttony as a sin? I thought that that view was just a tradition.

 

Also, C.S. Lewis has a great riff on gluttony in "The Screwtape Letters". He describes an old, thin woman as a glutton because she wants her food to be EXACTLY some way, and drives her servers and family crazy over this, while sort of pretending to be being simple and easy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do any churches today actually discuss the sin of gluttony today? Have you personally ever heard a sermon on it?

 

If not, do you wonder: why not?

 

I am beginning to believe that gluttony is probably the most dangerous sin in America today. Destroying more families & lives than any other.

 

I am wondering if all (??) churches and pastors avoid teaching about this sin because they are:

 

1) gluttonous themselves & resistant to changing

2) don't believe gluttony is actually a sin

3) are afraid of alienating their followers

 

I wonder if reintroducing morality into our choices about food might empower some people to overcome their slavery to food. I am wondering if/how churches might involve themselves in this topic without alienating their members.

 

If you do believe gluttony is a sin, then how do you personally define it?

 

TIA

 

Great subject for discussion, Tia. I have heard very little about this subject in all the years I've attended church. When I was a kid it was pointed out regularly that drinking and smoking were sinful, and I always wondered why they left out the part about gluttony. We have certainly seen enough church potlucks, cake walks and pie socials to prove that our example of eating needs to be overhauled. Along with a lack of teaching very little about taking a sabbath rest, the most churches are very guilty of ignoring to teach about taking care of our personal temples. This is one area that I believe contributes to the American church being asleep. It would be quite interesting to learn about what is taught about this in churches abroad in other countries.

 

I'll also add that I don't believe that the inclusion of food with church events is wrong. Sharing a meal in fellowship with believers is a tradition that began in ancient days and is not, in itself, the sin. It is the overeating on a regular basis, failing to eat the right foods that promote health, making an idol of food that I feel are the real sins.

 

This is one of the areas of sin that are big (no pun intended) in America today. I think that strong contenders for the "greatest" sin would be materialism and idol worship.

 

Thanks for bringing this up. We really do need to have more conversations about being better stewards of what God has given us.

 

Blessings,

Lucinda

Edited by HSMom2One
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There seems to be an assumption that overweight = glutton and thin/fit = non-glutton that I think one has to be careful about. You can have thin people who binge, overeat, make food an idol just as you can have overweight people with a right relationship toward food.

 

:iagree: Absolutely. In my "definition" I included several possible behaviors that would fall under gluttony. Only one mentioned overweight, and that, specifically caused from overeating. I, personally, am overweight due to gluttony (trust me! LOL). But that is me. There should be no assumption about gluttony based on a person's weight alone.

 

Plus, I think we're talking about acknowledging and confronting gluttony as a sin in a general way, not confronting or accusing individuals about weather they are gluttons or not. If gluttony is difined is such a way, during a sermon or conversation, that makes clear that there can be a right or wrong way to view and use food, then individuals should take no offense if it does not apply to them.

Edited by katemary63
Link to comment
Share on other sites

:iagree: Absolutely. In my "definition" I included several possible behaviors that would fall under gluttony. Only one mentioned overweight. I, personally, am overweight due to gluttony (trust me! LOL). But that is me. There should be no assumption about gluttony based on a person's weight alone.

 

 

I think it's possible for those who are "foodies" by definition or obsessed with only the most perfect foods to be gluttons as well. They've elevated food and the pleasure they get from preparing and eating it to a place of idolatry. It is not just the excessive eating any more than lust is only possible if it's an addiction to porn. Rebecca DeYoung's "Glittering Vices" is an excellent treatment of the Seven Deadly Sins. http://www.amazon.com/Glittering-Vices-Seven-Deadly-Remedies/dp/1587432323

 

Here's the chapter on Gluttony from Google Books: Go to Contents then "Feeding Your Face, Starving Your Heart"

http://books.google.com/books?id=iGqK65RGGkIC&printsec=frontcover&dq=glittering+vices+gluttony+chapter&source=bl&ots=8xJ968LAIr&sig=aSQbBMtyqr_e_0uj7tnlqohWNKM&hl=en&ei=X6VeTZmBPYG8lQfv6J2aDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CEAQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q&f=false

Edited by Jami
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So where does the Bible talk about gluttony as a sin? I thought that that view was just a tradition.

 

Also, C.S. Lewis has a great riff on gluttony in "The Screwtape Letters". He describes an old, thin woman as a glutton because she wants her food to be EXACTLY some way, and drives her servers and family crazy over this, while sort of pretending to be being simple and easy.

 

Proverbs 23 is a good one on gluttony. I don't want to quote the whole chapter.

 

Proverbs 28:7 says "He who keeps the law is a discerning son,But he who is a companion of gluttons humiliates his father."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Is gluttony eating foods that are bad for you, even if you aren't overweight? Is it eating any kind of food in excess, when you aren't hungry? Is it both?

 

 

I would also consider being obsessed with food, food issues, constantly thinking about being slim....that is making food an idol.

 

Anything that controls us...gluttony or food obsessions is sin. We are to only be under the control of the Hold Spirit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There seems to be an assumption that overweight = glutton and thin/fit = non-glutton that I think one has to be careful about. You can have thin people who binge, overeat, make food an idol just as you can have overweight people with a right relationship toward food.

:iagree: -- gluttony refers to an improper relationship to food. Putting it on a pedestal, so-to-speak. One can eat a lot and be a glutton. One can eat very little and be a glutton. My father who is very fit could arguably be called a glutton. My mother, who is not fit, I would have a difficult time labeling a glutton. If you watched them at the table...you would see what I mean.

 

It does not necessarilly mean one who is fat, automatically is a glutton. Some have argued those who buy expensive foods are "gluttons." In today's market... expensive/luxurious could mean organic foods (or even a hyper-focus on healthy eating).

 

The Pharisees did what was "right" (in a very legalistic sense), but were still sinning. It was the condition of their heart...something it is very difficult for man to judge.

 

I believe more needs to be done in nutrition education. Learning how to eat to live...vs. living to eat. Like Sodom, our country's easy availability to food has become a curse. As a society, we have let greed (a synonym of gluttony, by the way), the pursuit having more overwhelm and crush our understanding of nutrition.

 

I see no issues with a monthly church pot-luck... or even desserts. Just as I see no issue wtih the consumption of alcohol. When ones' relationship to food/drink is wrong... it's the state of the relationship NOT the object itself.

 

Just like worshiping a golden calf. There was nothing wrong with cows, but the act of worshiping the cow which was wrong.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another great resource for anyone wanting to over come gluttony is a new book "Made to Crave". It is seriously one of the best books I have ever read on dealing with any addictive type of sin issue not just food. It is written specifically to address food issues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:iagree: -- gluttony refers to an improper relationship to food. Putting it on a pedestal, so-to-speak. One can eat a lot and be a glutton. One can eat very little and be a glutton. My father who is very fit could arguably be called a glutton. My mother, who is not fit, I would have a difficult time labeling a glutton. If you watched them at the table...you would see what I mean.

 

It does not necessarilly mean one who is fat, automatically is a glutton. Some have argued those who buy expensive foods are "gluttons." In today's market... expensive/luxurious could mean organic foods (or even a hyper-focus on healthy eating).

 

The Pharisees did what was "right" (in a very legalistic sense), but were still sinning. It was the condition of their heart...something it is very difficult for man to judge.

 

I believe more needs to be done in nutrition education. Learning how to eat to live...vs. living to eat. Like Sodom, our country's easy availability to food has become a curse. As a society, we have let greed (a synonym of gluttony, by the way), the pursuit having more overwhelm and crush our understanding of nutrition.

 

I see no issues with a monthly church pot-luck... or even desserts. Just as I see no issue wtih the consumption of alcohol. When ones' relationship to food/drink is wrong... it's the state of the relationship NOT the object itself.

 

Just like worshiping a golden calf. There was nothing wrong with cows, but the act of worshiping the cow which was wrong.

 

Great post! :iagree: Like most things biblical, it comes back to the condition of the heart.

 

(While I am reading this thread, dh texts me and asks me if I want an ince cream cake for my birthday on Tuesday. :lol: I feel guilty that I do!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There seems to be an assumption that overweight = glutton and thin/fit = non-glutton that I think one has to be careful about. You can have thin people who binge, overeat, make food an idol just as you can have overweight people with a right relationship toward food.

 

this is VERY true! i would consider gluttony to be someone putting food as an idol. Just like some overweight people can NOT be gluttonous, some skinny people CAN! you can't tell by looking at someone and people shouldn't be judging other people anyway, but the job of a preacher is to teach truth- even hard truth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now I have a question: where does it say that drinking is a sin? Jesus turned water into wine at the wedding, not the other way around.

 

Drinking is not a sin. Drunkenness (a kind of gluttony) is a sin.

 

Galatians 5:19 - 22 Now the deeds of the flesh are evident, which are: immorality, impurity, sensuality, idolatry, sorcery, enmities, strife, jealousy, outbursts of anger, disputes, dissensions, factions, envying, drunkenness, carousing, and things like these, of which I forewarn you, just as I have forewarned you, that those who practice such things will not inherit the kingdom of God.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

not sin and lack of self control? i still have to choose, pick up and put the food in my mouth. just sayin. i know when i make certain choices, i gain weight and feel lousy--an indication that i have indulged in something that is purely for pleasure than for my well-being. that has little to naught to do with the food supply or history. i believe that our culture is very ready to pass off responsibility for most sins that affect the body to chemistry, genetics, and marketing these days. it makes it easier if you can say, "it's not my fault."

 

When I see an overweight person, don't think "sin".

 

There *are* biochemical realities to addiction that have been proven by science. The function of alcohol in an alcoholic, for example, is chemically different in the body of a non alcoholic.

 

I am a huge take responsibility advocote. I also believe that the whole picture must be evaluated. In evaluating the whole picture of food, I believe the research that suggests that the development of current food has elements that become a bio-chemical reality in person's bodies.

 

Do I think that can be changed by individuals? Yes. I changed drinking alcoholically by not ever putting it in my system. People can change their food issues, but only if they have the right information about how food effects them.

 

That information is debateable, confused, and may even vary by body.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The concept of sin is not a part of my belief system, but I certainly think gluttony as commonly defined, is unhealthy.

 

 

I wonder if reintroducing morality into our choices about food might empower some people to overcome their slavery to food. I am wondering if/how churches might involve themselves in this topic without alienating their members.

 

 

I hope I'm correct in thinking that you mean that this morality in food choices should be taught in churches and not society at large. We already have enough food police. :001_smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wonder if reintroducing morality into our choices about food might empower some people to overcome their slavery to food. I am wondering if/how churches might involve themselves in this topic without alienating their members.

 

Sure, gluttony is a sin. And if, according to Jesus, "thinking" about adultry is adultry then would just "thinking" about overindulging be gluttony?

 

My take is that we overeat because we are bored, or too self-focused, or complacent. Rather than have a church "preach" about repentance from the sin of gluttony, why not get the congregation OUT of the pews and INTO the community working to help people in need? When you're out serving someone else, there's no time to indulge Self.

 

Disclaimer: I'm overweight and the above is something that's been on my own heart for some time, based on my own experience and my own conviction. I have a dream. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I said this in the s/o thread.

 

Why must people suck the joy and beauty out of the abundance that is part of creation.

 

We can abuse this abundance (and many do-- Monsatan and other greed-mongers) or we can share it and try to get good food to all people.

 

Instead of creating an anger and shame based ministry by calling out the fat people at church (who may or may not be sinful), we could try to see that Jesus would want us to take care of each other, feed each other well (physically and emotionally) and share what we have.

 

There is a reason it's called Communion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since this is much my issue, I am agreeing!

 

I am actually going in for bloodwork next week to see what in the world is going on with my endocrine system.

 

I find I eat far less than many of my friends when we go out. I take home at least half of my meal, while they eat most or all of theirs. And yet, I don't lose weight. There is something other than gluttony going on. I am not saying I am perfect with my eating, but I can go for long periods of time sticking closely to an eating plan and not lose any weight at all.

 

Dawn

 

Yes, gluttony is a sin. But it can be a trap to think that you can identify when someone is indulging in that sin currently. Problems with hormones, thyroid etc. can make weight gain easy and weight loss difficult. Many people have listened to wrong information and have gotten heavier.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since this is much my issue, I am agreeing!

 

I am actually going in for bloodwork next week to see what in the world is going on with my endocrine system.

 

I find I eat far less than many of my friends when we go out. I take home at least half of my meal, while they eat most or all of theirs. And yet, I don't lose weight. There is something other than gluttony going on. I am not saying I am perfect with my eating, but I can go for long periods of time sticking closely to an eating plan and not lose any weight at all.

 

Dawn

 

The human body is an amazing creation. We're meant to find pleasure in eating, so that we will not starve.

 

We are meant to store fat in perparation for times of famine. Our brains have allowed us to preserve food, and move food, which means that more people have more food, and far fewer of us expereince regular famine. Sharing abundance with others is a way we share our lives and our gifts.

 

This is a complicated issue of biology that isn't goint to change. Not even if each and every Sunday pastors shame all of their fat members. Do the Amish eat? They do, and well. But they help each other raise barns and plow fields. Maybe every church needs a giant garden. Put up greenhouses, raise some organic hens for eggs. Do many churches sponsor gardens or community garden plots? Do something that makes a difference. Get people outside moving. Let the people dance.

Edited by LibraryLover
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the key to dealing with gluttony in any setting is to point out (as others have done here) that gluttony as referenced in the Bible is NOT just about overeating! While that is a part of it (and what most people think about when you talk about gluttony as evidenced by most of the posts here), gluttony is an overindulgence of ANYTHING!

 

We can be gluttons of entertainment, alcohol, clothing, money, sports, etc. Usually gluttony is tied closely with idolatry because what we crave or want more of soon becomes the focus in our lives. I wouldn't say that people who eat unhealthy foods are gluttons (rather not being a good steward of their body) or people who are obsessed with food and dieting are either (idolatry, but not gluttony). However, I am also not such a stickler that I would go around telling someone that if they eat a piece of chocolate cake they are sinning. God only wants us to do our best and then lean on Him for the rest.

 

As for the OP's original question that gluttony is a problem in our society, I agree. In the US we tend to think that bigger is better, more will make me happier, if I have one why not two or three, etc. When my dh was in India a few years ago, he asked his translator what was the one thing he would like to have more than anything. His translator didn't even hesitate in answering. What did he want? A washing machine. He had always wanted one, but never could afford it. I felt so humbled by his response.

 

I don't think it's wrong to be rich or have stuff, but when we want more just because we want it (no true need is involved), then we have crossed over into gluttony. Since my husband's trip to India, I've tried to use that mindset when I think about things I "need". Do I have to have a new purse or will the five others in my closet work fine? Do I have to have another piece of pie or am I already full?

 

No, this concept is not taught enough, and if it was taught properly EVERYONE in a church would feel convicted about something instead of just people who are overweight.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the key to dealing with gluttony in any setting is to point out (as others have done here) that gluttony as referenced in the Bible is NOT just about overeating! While that is a part of it (and what most people think about when you talk about gluttony as evidenced by most of the posts here), gluttony is an overindulgence of ANYTHING!

 

 

This is it, exactly! Gluttony is not only about food, it's about excess. I personally don't struggle much with gluttony re food, but do in respect of computer time--both are forms of the same failing, IMO.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...