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Question regarding high-school level science curriculum


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Hello. I am collecting information for a research paper on high-school level (or equivalent) curriculums in many industrialized nations. It has been challenging to find information on high school level lab science courses, taught in a home school. I have written some specific questions below. But, any information on this subject would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance for your time.

 

1. Is it possible to conduct the lab portion of high-school level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Anatomy courses at home?

 

2. Do teens generally take these courses outside of the home? At a local community college or high school perhaps?

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1. Yes. Some are easier to do and require less investment than others. The samples for anatomy classes are quite easy to come by and not expensive, for example. In some cases, the labs are modified to be more home-friendly. You might find a website like Home Science Tools to be helpful.

 

2. There is no such thing as 'generally' in homeschooling, but in addition to community colleges, some homeschoolers take classes that are more challenging to teach either at co-ops with other homeschoolers or online.

 

HTH

Debbie

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1. yes, but it can get pricey. The Chemistry is the hardest to do at home. Biology is very simple. Physics isn't too bad either.

 

2. I don't think most taken them at community college or in a high school. Many take them through a co-op. I would guess (totally guessing/don't know if my area is the same as the rest of the world) that most do them at home.

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Yes, labs CAN be done at home, but what CAN be done, is not always what SHOULD be done.

 

I suggest you see what Dr Robinson, who wrote the Robinson Curriculum, has to say about teaching science at home, to see what untraditional method just one group is using. They believe in delaying science textbooks until the 3Rs are completed through Calculus.

http://www.robinsoncurriculum.com/

 

The Teenage Liberation Handbook has been out for a long time. and still worth reading.

 

Apologia is a commonly used traditional type lab science curriculum designed for the home, for those who choose that route. http://www.apologia.com/

 

Co-ops and community colleges are commonly used resources.

 

My teenaged sons just graduated high school early and started their freshman years early at a community college that only required good 3R skills. My oldest graduated the CC and took off for Las Vegas, at the same time his age peers were graduating high school, with a degree in business and never took a lab science at all. At 24 he is engaged, building a home of his own, and in his 4th year of managing a chain retail store which often wins company national awards for performance. This years bonuses will be funding all the new furniture for the new house :-)

 

My son would just laugh at the idea of traditional high school and college labs and ask you why they are needed. He is doing just fine without them. He took nutrition at the CC for his science requirement and baked whole grain bread, so delicious the teacher accused him of lying. He'll tell you that learning the science of bread baking using an oven has been far more useful to him than learning to separate elements with a bunsen burner.

Edited by Hunter
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I've also known some families who use these textbooks to study agriculture and electricity for science. http://www.clp.org/store/by_grade/17

 

I've known some parents to use AP Environmental Science texts and have their child involved in a lot of community projects as "labs". A LOT of homeschoolers prepare for the AP science tests. AP science is often used by the Robinson folks that I linked you to in the previous post.

 

Somewhere there is a correspondence course for ornithology, that I've seen discussed over and over through the years, but am not sure if anyone actually uses it.

 

Some students study some heavy duty food science and nutrition courses that sometimes include real labs and other times just activities.

 

And then of course there is Prepare and Pray :-) I just had to throw that in for a well rounded representation of the entire community :-) It is not a common choice!

http://www.prepareandpray.com/

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My daughter took 4 high school science courses at home. We purchased our dissection kits and chemistry supply kits along with our curriculum.There are great websites to get these items.

 

www.hometrainingtools.com

 

www.workshopplus.com

 

 

We also performed easy around the house experiments and went to a local pond to do biology sketches. We did every lab referred to in our text because my daughter loves science that much. We also bought a high school microscope along with slides so that she could do the microscope portion. It costs quite a bit but it was so worth it.

 

A college in our area offers home school science. My daughter went to a 10 week chemistry class there also.

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It is absolutely possible to conduct the lab portion of high school level science courses at home. Check out LabPaqs.

 

I don't know if my son is the norm, but he will be taking chemistry and physics at the community college. He will have taken high school chemistry, meteorology, astronomy, and biology at home.

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1. Doing experiments at home? Of course you can. I can't imagine that there's anything that a public school science class could do that homeschoolers couldn't also do, if they wanted to do it.

 

2. On this particular forum, you'll find more people who have used "community college" courses, co-ops, online courses, etc. My experience in the homeschool community offline has been the complete opposite.

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1. Is it possible to conduct the lab portion of high-school level Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Anatomy courses at home?

 

Yes, it is.

 

2. Do teens generally take these courses outside of the home? At a local community college or high school perhaps?

 

Some do, some don't. My teen did Chemistry with lab at home. She elected to do Geology and Environmental Science at the local community college.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Guest Researching

First, I would like to thank all of you who replied to my questions. I can see that I have quite a bit of information to look in to now. I truly appreciate your time and I am grateful for the information that you have provided. Momto2Ns accurately described the challenges that I have encountered while trying to research this subject: "I don't think you can say what is generally done. Homeschools and homeschoolers are by nature independent and unique." Add to this the differing state regulations across all fifty states regarding home schooling curriculum, and well, you can imagine how complicated researching this subject has become.

 

I will have follow up questions. I will either post them here, or message some of you individually to ask them. I hope that this is alright, and again, I really appreciate your time.

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First, I would like to thank all of you who replied to my questions. I can see that I have quite a bit of information to look in to now. I truly appreciate your time and I am grateful for the information that you have provided. Momto2Ns accurately described the challenges that I have encountered while trying to research this subject: "I don't think you can say what is generally done. Homeschools and homeschoolers are by nature independent and unique." Add to this the differing state regulations across all fifty states regarding home schooling curriculum, and well, you can imagine how complicated researching this subject has become.

 

I will have follow up questions. I will either post them here, or message some of you individually to ask them. I hope that this is alright, and again, I really appreciate your time.

 

Indeed we can imagine. Welcome to our world. ;)

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My son is doing AP Physics now with PA Homeschoolers and they use LabPaq, which was already mentioned, to do I think 10-12 labs a year.

 

Kathy in Richmond tells in this post what she did for labs at home.

 

I'll be using the same online labs for biology. And we are also doing some from Lab Bench

 

We did chemistry with Kosmos & Thames but I would use LabPaq now if I had known about them.

 

And we used Georgia Public Broadcasting videos which include Physics labs at an easier level than for AP...

 

Joan

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