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Can anyone recommend a 'literature through movies' type book?


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MovieLit and Kathryn Stout's Movies as Literature. I have not used them enough to know how great they are, just knew we wanted film to be part of education, plus the kid loves to read what he wants to read.....and the stuff assigned to him...not so much. :D

 

If you have specific questions, I'd be happy to help, e-mail me or pm me if I don't answer right here. I'm surfing around.

 

LBS

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We used Kathryn Stout's Movies as Literature and loved it! The questions require critical thinking and analysis, and taught my son and me a lot about critically viewing movies. There are good suggestions for essays for each movie with an excellent explanation for writing 5-paragraph essays. I no longer have the currriculum, but I do remember there are suggestions for expanding its use. All in all, an excellent curriculum which I highly recommend.

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One other thought ...

 

 

There was an article by Rebecca Rupp in Home Education Magazine's January/February 2010 column titled Film Clubs. In it she listed resources for all ages including Movies as Literature {curriculum}, Math in the Movies {website}, Finding Inspiration in Literature and Movies {downloadable curriculum}, David Gilmour's memoir of homeschooling his troubled son via watching movies The Film Club, etc.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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I know this is not a film resource, BUT... I listed some ideas in this past thread for DC who don't like to read or who have never read the classics that might help encourage you to do a LITTLE reading of classics -- it's good for everyone! (And who knows, start small with reading great short stories watching plays, or listening to classics as books on tape -- and DC may develop a taste for it!;))

 

Below are some more ideas. ENJOY watching AND reading your literature! ;) Warmest regards, Lori D.

 

 

- WATCH a classic play, and then discuss the next day.

 

- Read some very engaging or intense short stories and discuss:

* The Lady or the Tiger (Stockton)

* The Most Dangerous Game (Connell)

* Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (Bierce)

* How Much Land Does a Man Need (Tolstoy)

* Ransom of Red Chief; Gift of the Magi (or other story by O. Henry)

* A Story Without an End (Twain)

* The Open Window (Saki)

* The Monkey's Paw (Jacobs)

* The Lottery (Jackson)

* There Will Come Soft Rains (Bradbury) -- resources

* The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas (LeGuin)

* The Metamorphoses (Kafka)

* The Catbird Seat (Thurber)

 

- Enjoy a classic work with a well-written program like Literature Lessons from the Lord of the Rings that helps you understand literary terms and basic themes, and helps bring to life a very enjoyable classic.

 

- Read a series of classic sci-fi, fantasy, or whatever genre of works DS does enjoy and discuss/analyze.

 

- Read some poems with great storylines:

* "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" (Coleridge) -- I kid you not: it has zombies!!

* "Midnight Ride of Paul Revere" (Wordsworth) -- adventure!

* "Darkness (Byron) -- yowzah! powerful story/images of what mankind would do to one another if the sun suddenly died

Edited by Lori D.
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