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In defense of carrots . . .


jld
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Nothing new here really.

 

To ignore the overall qualities of food is unwise. The high GI carbohydrates found in foods like a potatoes or carrots do not make them any more unhealthful than do the simple sugars found in fruits make them unhealthful. Nutrition-savvy people already know the general concept that legumes, whole grains, fruits and vegetables are good foods. In the whole scheme of the nutritional needs of people the importance of the rate of absorption of carbohydrates (the GI) is overrated and frequently leads the poorly-informed consumer to make bad food choices.

 

 

I didn't lose weight on an Atkins style diet, but there is no doubt that simple processed carbs are terrible for me. The focus has to be on whole grain, legumes, veggies, fruit, and good protein. It just takes a little work. It's what I'm doing with WW and it's working for me...finally.

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Yes, that is common sense.

 

And the truth is that in a traditional diet most of these high GI foods (potatoes, carrots, rice etc) would be eaten with a little fat, which immediately lowers the GI. If you put a dob of butter on your carrots, a spoonful of sour cream on your potato, or eat your rice with a curry that has some low GI foods/fats in it- immediately the overall GI is lowered.

 

It is definitely take way out of context.

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Here's an alternative view of the glycemic index:

http://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2006nl/july/glycemic.htm

Very interesting. Thank you.

I had a feeling that this was true. It's nice to see it all laid out. Common-sense advice.

 

If you put a dob of butter on your carrots, a spoonful of sour cream on your potato, or eat your rice with a curry that has some low GI foods/fats in it- immediately the overall GI is lowered.

I had no idea about that. Thanks for sharing, Peela. :) I knew it tasted better ;), but didn't know that it lowered GI :).

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Yes, that is common sense.

 

And the truth is that in a traditional diet most of these high GI foods (potatoes, carrots, rice etc) would be eaten with a little fat, which immediately lowers the GI. If you put a dob of butter on your carrots, a spoonful of sour cream on your potato, or eat your rice with a curry that has some low GI foods/fats in it- immediately the overall GI is lowered.

 

It is definitely take way out of context.

That's funny. Suzanne Somers' diet is all about separating fats and carbs. She says that carbs make your body release insulin, which is the only way your body can store fat... so eat lots of fat and protein in meals that have no carbs. Eat your carbs separately with no fat. Eat your fruit separately from all else. Her diet is all about absorption.

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I do think "starchy" veggies like carrots, peas, yams, potatoes, corn, etc. need to be eaten in moderation and always in combination with a bit of fat and a bit of protein. But I don't give them up entirely like Atkins and Phase 1 of South Beach say to. They are nutrient-rich even if they are higher on the carb count than other veggies. Carrots and yams in particular are great sources of Vitamin A :)

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In defense of the Glycemic Index.....

 

I'm a type 2 diabetic and I find the glycemic index charts extremely useful in that they give me a pretty good estimate of how my blood sugar levels are going to be impacted by various foods.

 

It doesn't mean I avoid those foods, but I eat them in smaller portions or replace them with a lower GI food when I can. Since the goal is to keep my blood sugar levels lower and stable, the GI index is a useful tool.

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Yes, that is common sense.

 

And the truth is that in a traditional diet most of these high GI foods (potatoes, carrots, rice etc) would be eaten with a little fat, which immediately lowers the GI. If you put a dob of butter on your carrots, a spoonful of sour cream on your potato, or eat your rice with a curry that has some low GI foods/fats in it- immediately the overall GI is lowered.

 

It is definitely take way out of context.

 

Eating your veggies with a bit of fat also helps you to absorb the vitamins in the veggies. I'm always doing crudites with a bit of hummus or salad with a dressing that has a bit of oil in it. Delicious and healthy, as long as the proportion of veggies to fat is reasonable!

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That's funny. Suzanne Somers' diet is all about separating fats and carbs. She says that carbs make your body release insulin, which is the only way your body can store fat... so eat lots of fat and protein in meals that have no carbs. Eat your carbs separately with no fat. Eat your fruit separately from all else. Her diet is all about absorption.

 

I am not so familiar with Susan Somers or where she is coming from (there are different reasons for different dietary approaches)- but yes, you will absorb /digest the carbs quicker/easier without fats- but the point here is to absorb them slower, not quicker.

Vitamin A, in carrots, is a fat soluble vitamin- and yes, will absorb better with fats, as well.

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