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All About Spelling is EXPENSIVE...or is it just me?


warriormom
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Ok, I have heard so many GREAT things about All About Spelling. It kind of seems expensive to me. Spelling Power always appealed to me since I only had to buy 1 spelling book for K-12. Can you tell me more about All About Spelling?

 

1.) Is it a phonics program as well as a spelling program?

2.) IF I decide to get AAS, what should I get?

3.) Would this be a good program after finishing TYCTR100EZ lessons (and reading the suggested books)?

4.) Any other suggestions for a good spelling/phonetic program?

:confused:

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AAS does teach phonics and all the spelling rules.

 

No matter the age of the student they suggest starting with Level 1.

 

You will need the teachers manual and student material packet.

 

I'm not familiar with TYCTR100EZ but I used OPGTR and it fit just fine. In fact, my daughter was an advanced reader when I started AAS and she LOVES it. I love it because it is teaching her to spell correctly through phonics and the rules instead of memorizing lists of words each week as some programs do.

 

It is a little pricey but IMO worth the money. Also, they resell quickly and easily.

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I use it and I find it expensive as well. If you are starting out I'd get the basic interactive kit that includes letter tiles, magnets, phonogram CD, and divider cards. You'd also need the Level 1 Teacher and Student packet which is $29.95 so initial outlay is around $60. I also really like the spelling review box which is another $9.95. It's not necessary but they fit the cards better than the box I'd gotten at Walmart to hold them.

 

I bought an additional student pack because I'm using it with twins which adds up. I bought the readers as well which I think are quite expensive for what they are but I like them and they tie in nicely with the lessons so I will probably continue to buy them.

 

All of AAS is nonconsumable so it can easily be sold when you are done with it. Any younger siblings can use it without purchasing anything new. Most other spelling programs we've used are consumable and I couldn't resell or reuse with a younger sibling.

 

AAS isn't a phonics program but they are supposed to be releasing All About Reading this month which is a phonics program and would tie into AAS. I'm planning to get that once it's released.

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Ok, I have heard so many GREAT things about All About Spelling. It kind of seems expensive to me.

 

It IS expensive, but I paid it and I LOVE the program, so I'm dealing. It is non-consumable, so all my kids will be able to use it, and then I could sell it if it still has any resale value left by that time. But really, my son and I love it so much, and it's way more fun than regular spelling programs where you just memorize a list of words.

 

1.) Is it a phonics program as well as a spelling program?

 

Yes, it teaches all the phonograms and the phonics rules.

 

2.) IF I decide to get AAS, what should I get?

 

I got the letter tiles and magnets, the level 1 student/teacher package, and the level 2 student/teacher package (we went through level 1 in 3 weeks, so I'm glad I went ahead and got both at the same time! Level 2 should go slower). I did not get the phonogram CD, as I had already gotten the tiles/magnets from Rainbow Resource when ordering other stuff (I was just going to use them with OPGTR, but then after trying 2 cheaper spelling programs, I realized I should really just use AAS and be done with it).

 

ETA: After reading the PP (after I posted), I forgot to say that I also got the card box and the laminated dividers. I really like both! They were definitely worth the extra money.

 

3.) Would this be a good program after finishing TYCTR100EZ lessons (and reading the suggested books)?

Absolutely. My son was reading at a 4th grade level when we started the program. He's really enjoying it. We could have easily started a year ago as well when he was in K. I'm actually thinking of trying it with my 4 year old this summer or fall. He's only reading CVC words right now, so I'd be going really slow with him. It can be used with early readers and well seasoned readers.

 

4.) Any other suggestions for a good spelling/phonetic program?

:confused:

There are plenty of cheaper options. There are the Spalding and Spalding-based programs (Writing Road to Reading is the manual for Spalding and is about $20, SWR is Spalding based and I think it's around $100 for the whole program?). I chose AAS partly because it's EASY to teach. It's completely scripted (though you can go away from the script), and it's laid out so that you can just open and go. You don't have to already know all your phonograms or spelling rules or anything like that. I'm learning spelling rules along with my son! I had no clue when to use 'c' vs 'k' at the beginning of a word, for example (see the sample lesson of level 1 for that info). I had just memorized the spellings.

 

I do think AAS should be priced less, given that the cards are perforated print outs on card stock that you have to break apart yourself, and the letter tiles are laminated card stock that you have to cut apart yourself and apply magnets to. But again, I love the program. I just decided that I wanted my son and I to ENJOY spelling rather than dreading it, and we really do. It's one subject I actually look forward to each day! :D

 

I think the worst part of the expense is that it's just costly to start up. You have to get the tiles/magnets and TWO levels usually, because level 1 goes by so quick. Beyond that, it won't be quite so bad each year. But yes, it's pricey, yet very effective (at least for us so far, having done level 1... my son is already applying what he's learned, and it's so cool to see the light bulb go on!).

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I do think it is expensive and that is why I held off buying it for awhile. I tried another spelling program and it didn't work out. I wish I would have just bought AAS from the beginning. :glare:

 

I agree that it has good resale value, and seems to sell very fast! I could never get a used set, I kept missing them. But try to stalk the for sale board for awhile, and you may get lucky. :) I agree with everything AmyinMD said to buy, that is what I bought as well. You can use it for other children, or probably sell it very easily once you are done. But even without taking the resale value into consideration, I do think that it is worth the cost. And that means a lot coming from me, I am cheap. :lol:

 

It is a good program, and all of the parts work together and make so much sense. That is why it is so much more effective than say, just a workbook. I can appreciate the approach now that I have seen it, read the teacher's manual, etc. Before that I was sort of like...huh? It would be my suggestion for a spelling program, and it does enforce phonics as well. HTH!

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Worth every penny. My daughter loves it and I got the AAR book too. Now she reads to me one story at bedtime with no groaning.

I was doing OPGTR but when I added AAS I saw an immediate improvement and interest in reading. She writes often too. I believe it is directly related to AAS. I did not get the CD or the box to hold the cards. I took the cards with me to the container store and found one that works. I do not have a giant magnetic board either. I might get one at some point but now things work fine on the floor for my wiggle worm. She actually learns better if she can jump to reward herself.

I cut corners when and where I can but this program was worth every penny. Put a $5 back every week until you have the payment. It is worth it.

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I use Spelling Power with my oldest and AAS with my 2nd and they are VERY different programs.

 

SP is basically a set of lists and there isn't much in the way of explicit teaching of the rules. It's a good "fit" for my "natural" speller and I was able to jump right in at her level (she placed into G but I did selected lists from E & F first) rather than having to backtrack all the way down to level 2 of AAS.

 

AAS is a much more comprehensive program. It's a good "fit" for my DS, who needs systematic, explicit teaching of the rules. It is expensive but worth it for him.

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I agree with just about everything already said. Yes, it is expensive- but it is worth it to me. :001_smile: Dd is not a natural speller, and has really benefitted from the systematic instruction. The lack of busywork is a big plus to me, even though the program is teacher intensive. I detest busywork.

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i agree it is expensive. i recently purchased the basic kit (30) levels 1(30) and 2(40) those each include a teacher's manual and 1 student pack. you can buy additional student packs if needed. I also bought the special box(10):tongue_smilie: and one of the readers (20).

 

here is a link to the product page:

http://www.all-about-spelling.com/spelling-products.html

 

 

i am using the program with my 6 year old who is almost done with opg. the reader is more for my 4 1/2 yr old who is just starting opg. i wanted to try the reader as an alternative to the bob books.

 

my oldest seemed to pick up the rules in opg so i wonder if aas will be the best use of our time (we have just started). i figure i'll work through levels one and two and make my decision at that point. the website offers a one year money back guarantee, so I can use that if necessary. It seems like a great program if it works for you and your dc. Once you figure that out, you'll know if it is worth the money. (i'll be figuring out that one for myself in the next year)

 

good luck in your decision making

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I agree it is expensive, but it is so worth it. I tried Spelling Workout which was just busy work, then Sequential spelling which didn't explain the phonic rules, and finally decided to get All About Spelling and couldn't be happier. For my son, it not only works on spelling but his reading is where I get the best payoff. The phonic rules make sense, and I guess it is the combination of learning through seeing, manipulating, hearing, and writing, but the retention is better than any other program in any other subject I have found as of yet.

 

I am holding on to the AAS that we have finished to use with the 4 year old, but if not the resale value is excellent as well.

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I'll be the dissenting voice. I bit the bullet and purchased the first two levels after reading reviews here about how great it is. She's a great reader and is great at phonics, but a poor speller and I thought it be a gentle way to help her spell. I wish I never had. She hated it. I hated it. She cried about doing it. (And she's not a crier.) We finally switched to Sequential Spelling and she LOVES it.

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1.) Is it a phonics program as well as a spelling program?

 

It's a complete phonics program--everything your child can spell, she can read. It's scripted and paced for spelling though. Some people feel very comfortable making slight adjustments to focusing on reading, and use it for dual purpose. Others want something separate for teaching reading.

 

2.) IF I decide to get AAS, what should I get?

 

Probably the Basic Kit and Level 1 to start.

 

3.) Would this be a good program after finishing TYCTR100EZ lessons (and reading the suggested books)?

 

I used Reading Reflex, so can't comment on 100 EZ lessons directly--this would have worked very well with RR though--I wish I had found it when my kids were much younger, that's for sure. We went through Spelling Power, Natural Speller, Sequential Spelling, Spectrum Spelling, making up my own spelling with dictation (which was 2nd only to AAS for us), Tricks of the Trade...After all that, AAS didn't seem so expensive, LOL! And especially after I tried to design my own multi-sensory program and saw just how much time it took me.

 

Not all kids need AAS. It's best for kids who are either new to spelling, kids who want to learn the rules, or for kids who are struggling with spelling.

 

HTH some! Merry :-)

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I wouldn't say AAS is right for every kid, but if it's right for yours, it's worth every penny. I like that it is non-consumable (all except for the progress charts which you can easily do on your own or skip them, they aren't necessary just a fun extra). I do plan to use it for more than one child. I think it's a great program. I do think it is pricey for just one subject, but if you need it, you need it! I love the fact that it is all done for me, I don't need to do any planning, just making sure the tiles are ready to go and cards organized. I see that a lot of detail-oriented work has gone into this curriculum and so I think it's worth the money. I appreciate the little tips on the side. While my son is breezing through it all very quickly, I can see that all the little extra helps placed throughout the book would be very helpful if my child was needing more practice.

 

So yes, expensive but worth it. And frankly, it isn't anymore than I spent for the whole kit and caboodle of SOTW materials...AG and all.

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I wouldn't say AAS is right for every kid, but if it's right for yours, it's worth every penny. I like that it is non-consumable (all except for the progress charts which you can easily do on your own or skip them, they aren't necessary just a fun extra).

 

Actually you can download extras of these for free on their message board, the chatterbee, or you can email & they'll send you a download.

 

So yes, expensive but worth it. And frankly, it isn't anymore than I spent for the whole kit and caboodle of SOTW materials...AG and all.

 

LOL, yes, when I was first wrestling with it and one day thought, I spend more than this on math each year, and I use my spelling skills as much as I use my math skills...that put it into perspective for me!

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Ok, I have heard so many GREAT things about All About Spelling. It kind of seems expensive to me. Spelling Power always appealed to me since I only had to buy 1 spelling book for K-12. Can you tell me more about All About Spelling?

 

1.) Is it a phonics program as well as a spelling program?

2.) IF I decide to get AAS, what should I get?

3.) Would this be a good program after finishing TYCTR100EZ lessons (and reading the suggested books)?

4.) Any other suggestions for a good spelling/phonetic program?

:confused:

 

It's all about perspective. Most o/g programs are much more expensive. Wilson runs $500, and Barton has 10 levels and runs $250 to 350 a level. :D The Phonics Road to Reading runs $200 a level (with 4 levels) and Spell to Write and read is $100 for material, and unless you are smarter than I and can figure it out on your own you need to attend the $100 basic seminar, and later the $100 advanced seminar.

 

The strength in o/g is the multi-sensory work. Workbooks are cheap to print, but not as effective. The tiles, visual work (cards, word banks), dictation, homonym work, silent e book, plural book, and writing station all come together to create a very solid program, with very little teacher prep and scripted lessons.

 

I have been able to re-use all the materials/cards for the next child (except the jail, silent e and plural books, which you can buy cheaply from AAS), and so far it has worked well for all my kiddos. My children do tend to do better with spelling than blending, so a spelling focus, like what is in AAS, works well here. 100 EZ lessons quickly went out the door, never to be seen again.

 

If you have an older child you can start with level 2, but personally I wouldn't start with any higher level. Level 2 is the only one that quickly reviews everything learned in level 1. From level 3 on out it assumes mastery of all previous material. But with a younger student I would start with level 1, even if most of it is review, because the goal is mastery.

 

Heather

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If I added up all the $$ I have spent (and wasted) by buying other spelling programs that DIDN'T work, it would be far more than the initial cost of AAS. So wish I had known about it when I was starting out and been able to save not only the money, but the frustration and time, too. It is a solid spelling AND phonics program and IMHO, worth every cent. :001_smile:

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just a suggestiin for those with multiple children: I bought 2 sets of cards, as suggested, but found a better/cheaper method and wish I had saved my $. I found that most of my kids needed to learn the same phonograms (b is easy when you know how to read, but ch making the k sound or ng isn't as much). So I got out colored index cards and designated a color for eeach kid. On the cards I listed out everything they need to masted. (every phonogram on that card, every key 1-whatever on that card, ect.) As that child mastered things, I check it off on their card, which it kept in the front of the box. Cards do leave the review section until everyone's got it. So, as I start a lesson, I take 2 seconds to flip through the review cards and take out what that kid needs. It's fast, easy, and I'm not even using that second box I painstakingly punched out. I suppose if you had one child who struggled immensely more than the others, you'd want a seperate box, but I haven't found it necessary. Just something else taking up room on the shelf.

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AAS is something I cannot wait to use for next year. After watching my youngest struggle with reading so much, I would pay triple the amount for something that will help him along. I know it's not a reading program, but he is making significant progress with the I See Sam readers, and I think (hope!) AAS will spur him on.

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I never thought that AAS was that expensive. The inital purchase was $60 but we are using it for Spelling and Reading/Phonics instruction plus I have another child coming up that will be able to use it. Each subsequent year will be less ($39.95).

 

In comparison - I spent $61.85 for SOTW1, the activity guide and pdf student pages. We haven't even started using this yet and I'm glad I got it but it probably won't get as much daily use as AAS. Doesn't count the purchase of the Usborne IL Encyclopedia of World History and various picture books and chapter books I bought to go along with it.

 

ETC was pretty cheap - less than $18.00 for Books 1 and 2.

 

For Science, I purchased BFSU ($25.00) but feel the need for more open-and-go stuff so I am going to use the BFSU sequence but use RSO to flesh it out. This means buying all three Level 1 RSO books at once for $38.99 each. That doesn't count the large number of experiment books and picture books I also bought. Also doensn't count the supplies we will need to do the experiments.

 

Math Mammoth is $32.00 for 1st Grade and we will probably only use 1/2 of it before having to get Grade 2, altholugh this will be used with dd also.

 

Handwriting without tears for my dd - just the book, teachers guide (only one I plan to buy) and the stamp & see - will run $33.00.

 

This isn't everything but its a typical sampling of what we use. Compared to boxed curriculums, I always felt we were getting off cheap.

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I too agree with many..it's costly. However I paid for level 1 and level 2 for 2 children just recently and have NO regrets! We love spelling now!!

 

It's taken my natural speller into wanting to try and SPELL on her own when writing..which before she prompted me to help her spell..now she tries to spell EVERYTHING on her own. She might not get everything correct but that's a HUGE leap in our home.

 

It's taken my struggling reader dd5 from frustrated in reading to wanting to read words with the tiles and spell!! Her reading has improved BIG time since beginning AAS.

 

I bought EVERYTHING used so I didn't spend retail for everything. But I did have to hold out on starting the program 2 weeks to wait for all the supplies to arrive from different sellers. Well worth the effort in purchasing used.

 

I got TM for level 1 and level 2. Magnet tiles, Phono CD, Student Packets for level 1 (2 of those) and Student Packets for level 2 (2 of those as well)...so my children didn't have to share the cards. Now I'm considering purchasing another set of tiles so they don't have to share those either. I usually would only purchase 1 of each level but because I'm starting my dd5 and dd7 both on AAS I know they will progress differently and I didn't want to write notes and post it's to keep track of their progress since they'd share a set of cards. I think my total investment for everything and 2 sets of student packets for levels 1 & 2 was just under $104.

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just a suggestiin for those with multiple children: I bought 2 sets of cards, as suggested, but found a better/cheaper method and wish I had saved my $. I found that most of my kids needed to learn the same phonograms (b is easy when you know how to read, but ch making the k sound or ng isn't as much). So I got out colored index cards and designated a color for eeach kid. On the cards I listed out everything they need to masted. (every phonogram on that card, every key 1-whatever on that card, ect.) As that child mastered things, I check it off on their card, which it kept in the front of the box. Cards do leave the review section until everyone's got it. So, as I start a lesson, I take 2 seconds to flip through the review cards and take out what that kid needs. It's fast, easy, and I'm not even using that second box I painstakingly punched out. I suppose if you had one child who struggled immensely more than the others, you'd want a seperate box, but I haven't found it necessary. Just something else taking up room on the shelf.

 

Boy does that help me!!! Thank you thank you!!!

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This probably sounds terribly cheap, but here goes anyway. Can you make your own set of tiles/magnets from craft supply stuff/home printer/laminater? Is there some sort of master list in the level one kit that explains what's in the start up kit? Can you buy one and make the other?

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This probably sounds terribly cheap, but here goes anyway. Can you make your own set of tiles/magnets from craft supply stuff/home printer/laminater? Is there some sort of master list in the level one kit that explains what's in the start up kit? Can you buy one and make the other?

 

Probably. The list of phonograms covered is in the back of the book. You just need to color code them. Red=vowels and vowel teams, blue=consonants and constant teams, /er/ sounds = purple, suffixes= pink, prefixes = cream, /sh/ sounds = green, or, ar are "other" and yellow, and then ed, -, ' are orange and also "other"

 

Their is a card for each of the main words (not the extra words), so you could write them on 3x5 cards. Same with phonograms, sound cards and you could make your own rule cards.

 

But the TM is $17, so you only save about $13, and you have a lot of work to do.

 

Heather

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Over the years, I am finding I often get what I pay for.

 

AAS is really not bad when you consider you are teaching the lifelong skills of reading and spelling. Additionally there is a certain amount of teacher training in the process. I don't know about you, but when I started home schooling, I didn't know how to do a lot of things. The scripts you get w/ AAS are teaching training condensed for your use.

 

My favorite programs, The Phonics Road and Tapestry of Grace, are up front costly, but worth every penny and will provide for years of education. Break it down over many children and they are both bargains!

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This probably sounds terribly cheap, but here goes anyway. Can you make your own set of tiles/magnets from craft supply stuff/home printer/laminater? Is there some sort of master list in the level one kit that explains what's in the start up kit? Can you buy one and make the other?

 

I took some poster board and printed the phonograms on it in different colors. I cut the poster board into normal paper sized pieces, made the font really big, double spaced everything, and cut everything out myself. It took about 2 hours. I am using it with 2 students but I only need one set of letters. They are sturdy and while I was unable to cut them all out to exactly the same size of a perfect square or rectangle or whatever, they work fine. I didn't know you needed them when I bought everything and it was going to be so expensive with shipping to order them alone after the fact. They aren't magnetized as I've felt no need yet. We just do it on the floor. I used the master list in the back of the book and I didn't follow their color guidelines exactly. It doesn't matter, IMO, as long as you know when they say "yellow" tiles then you should say "orange" or whatever color you use. The yellow from my printer was too light and were hard on the eyes so I switched it to something else.

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  • 3 years later...

Ok, I have heard so many GREAT things about All About Spelling. It kind of seems expensive to me. Spelling Power always appealed to me since I only had to buy 1 spelling book for K-12. Can you tell me more about All About Spelling?

 

1.) Is it a phonics program as well as a spelling program?

2.) IF I decide to get AAS, what should I get?

3.) Would this be a good program after finishing TYCTR100EZ lessons (and reading the suggested books)?

4.) Any other suggestions for a good spelling/phonetic program?

:confused:

 

You can do Spalding for a one-time purchase of less than $50. Spalding teaches children to read by teaching them to spell (yes, children who already read can benefit from Spalding), and simultaneously teaches penmanship, capitalization and punctuation, and simple writing, all in one fell swoop, for multiple children.  It's all you need for "language arts" except for a library card (Spalding recommends good trade books rather than vocabulary-controlled basal readers).

 

You will need to study the manual first (Writing Road to Reading; Spalding is the method, WRTR is the manual), but once you get started, you just jump right in each day. :-)

 

When I taught Spalding in a one-room school, all the children improved their spelling skills by at least two grade levels by Christmas, and I taught one child to read whose previous teachers suspected that he was dyslexic (he wasn't; they were just trying to do sight reading with him).

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This probably sounds terribly cheap, but here goes anyway. Can you make your own set of tiles/magnets from craft supply stuff/home printer/laminater? Is there some sort of master list in the level one kit that explains what's in the start up kit? Can you buy one and make the other?

I did this. I am using level 5 currently with my son. I have only ever purchased the teacher's manuals. He hardly ever uses the letter tiles. It just isn't his thing. He'd rather use a white board or spell words orally. This year he is enjoying illustrating his dictated sentences from the lessons.

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I see that this is an old thread, but I just bought AAS last night and I do have to say I have buyers remorse right now. :/  I really hope it's worth it.  I can't believe I paid so much for it, but I did go off of other's reviews because I am desperately needing something that works for ds7.  OPGTR has been working for phonics and I like the idea that the two can be used/ are being used by other families here on the forum.  

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I see that this is an old thread, but I just bought AAS last night and I do have to say I have buyers remorse right now. :/  I really hope it's worth it.  I can't believe I paid so much for it, but I did go off of other's reviews because I am desperately needing something that works for ds7.  OPGTR has been working for phonics and I like the idea that the two can be used/ are being used by other families here on the forum.  

 

It worked great for us and was totally worth it, but they do have a 1-year, 100% guarantee in case it's not a good fit for you & your kids. I spend more on math without thinking about it, and math and spelling are both daily-used skills, so that made it worth it to me. Anyway, hope it works out for you!

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Excellent analogy, Merry, between spelling and math. I had never thought about it before, but they are both essential skills for daily life, and while weaknesses in both areas can be aided by modern technology (calculators and spellchecker), a strong foundation is essential for both. Thinking about it this way, I should be willing to spend at least as much on reading & spelling curricula as I do on math (and I have been known to buy 3-4 curricula for one child just to make sure all the bases and possible approaches are covered).

 

I think you'll be pleased with AAS.

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AAS is phonics and spelling in one.  

 

I used AAS for 3 years, beginning after we finished TYCTR.  It laid a beautiful foundation for spelling and reading, things we continue to utilize now that we've moved on to a less phonics based spelling curriculum.  

 

Last summer, I sold my magnetic tiles and student materials (the cards and dividers), and easily made back 50 percent of the original cost.  

 

Stella

 

 

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