Jump to content

Menu

For those of us that teach evolution as fact....


Veritaserum
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm trying to find a good science program for dd next year (6th). I stumbled upon these:

 

http://saxonhomeschool.hmhco.com/en/products/default.htm?level2Code=M0010&level3Code=M31099&level4Code=M000129&level5Code=

 

They have free homeschool lesson plans. I'm still unsure if the labs are doable at home, but I'm strongly considering giving one of these programs a go next year. It seems like an easier solution than PH or CPO. We tried OM earlier this year, but it wasn't a good fit for dd.

 

I'm pretty sure we will use OM for high school science, though. They have a syllabus with homeschool-appropriate labs and lab kits (squee!).

 

What do you think of the Saxon packages? What do you use for science (all grades)? Is evolution taught or even mentioned as fact in what you use? Anyone know of any evolution-based science programs that come with a supply kit packaged for homeschool use? That's what I really want. *sigh*

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:bigear:

 

I don't have any input on the program you asked about, but I look forward to hearing what others say.

 

If you are interested in resources dedicated just to evolution, Intellego is putting out unit studies on Evolution for both K-2 and grades 6-8. For just $10.95 on Currclick, it might be worth a look. They're not out yet, but when I emailed them, they said the K-2 one should be out this month.

 

I have several books on teaching evolution to older children, they might have some good ideas. I'd have to look through them though, I set them aside as my daughter got a really good early education on evolution from what I was able to put together a few years ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm trying to find a good science program for dd next year (6th). I stumbled upon these:

 

http://saxonhomeschool.hmhco.com/en/products/default.htm?level2Code=M0010&level3Code=M31099&level4Code=M000129&level5Code=

 

They have free homeschool lesson plans. I'm still unsure if the labs are doable at home, but I'm strongly considering giving one of these programs a go next year. It seems like an easier solution than PH or CPO. We tried OM earlier this year, but it wasn't a good fit for dd.

 

I'm pretty sure we will use OM for high school science, though. They have a syllabus with homeschool-appropriate labs and lab kits (squee!).

 

What do you think of the Saxon packages? What do you use for science (all grades)? Is evolution taught or even mentioned as fact in what you use? Anyone know of any evolution-based science programs that come with a supply kit packaged for homeschool use? That's what I really want. *sigh*

 

Laura, you need to get in touch with Corraleno (Jackie). She has several great ideas on this topic and can give you some options.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This probably won't help you now but for those of us with younger kids - the Level 2's of the RSO programs will mention evolution.

 

That's why I've been sticking with RSO. :) I pretty much ditched BFSU when I heard he wouldn't cover evolution in his second book. Well, I guess I already gave up on it by then though.

 

We started teaching evolution mingled with history and science at age 4. It made so much sense. We also had fun learning about the Galapagos Islands and Charles Darwin. We have some cute YouTube videos out there. :)

 

This book might help on teaching evolution to older children. I haven't read it, but it looks very helpful.

NSTA Tool Kit for Teaching Evolution

Science, Evolution, and Creationism - helpful for those people who are uncomfortable with evolution, shows evolution can be fully compatible with religious faith

 

There's also some great websites out there. This should be a good start for folks.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is a great series of BBC videos on evolution:

 

Before the Dinosaurs: Walking with Monsters

Walking with Dinosaurs

Walking with Prehistoric Beasts

Walking with Cavemen

 

If your daughter is a strong reader, she could read Charles Darwin's Voyage of the Beagle. My 5th grade son loved it. It is a beautifully written travel log of the research Darwin did that led to his book The Origin of Species (which I would wait until later to read as the writing and ideas are much more complex.)

 

Philip Whitfield has a nice book on evolution which a strong 6th grade reader could handle called Life: Evolution Explained (Quantum Books) (ISBN 978-1-84573-374-2)

 

Another book (lower reading level) that is good is from Time Life's Understanding Science and Nature series. It is called Evolution of Life. (ISBN 0-8094-9695-X)

 

For much younger children (3rd-4th grade) I'd recommend this meaty picture book: What Darwin Saw: The Journey that Changed the World by Rosalyn Schanzer.

Edited by Kalmia
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great list of suggestions!

 

Charlie's Playhouse has reviews for books on evolution.

 

I can understand why so many curriculums want to remain neutral on evolution, what I don't understand is how they remain neutral. How do you teach astronomy (light years), geology (rock formation and strata), dinosaurs and fossils, genetics, etc. without at least touching on evolution or age of the earth issues?

 

That's my main reason for wanting a program that will eventually teach evolution. I feel like they are less likely to leave things out of all the other areas that evolution/AOE touches on.

Edited by dottieanna29
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can understand why so many curriculums want to remain neutral on evolution, what I don't understand is how they remain neutral. How do you teach astronomy (light years), geology (rock formation and strata), dinosaurs and fossils, genetics, etc. without at least touching on evolution or age of the earth issues?

I was wondering the same thing. I would assume that if a curriculum claims neutrality on evolution/creation debate they still teach the traditional understanding of time periods in regards to geology and astronomy. Genetics doesn't change for the most part. The vast majority of creationists accept speciation, or the E. Coli experiments, for example, which fit in with both a creationist or an evolutionist viewpoint.

 

I am trying to teach my kids both viewpoints. I don't want a neutral curriculum that leaves all of that out... I want a curriculum that will give a good understanding of both.

 

It annoys me to no end that the vast majority of people can come out of 13+ years of school with no real understanding of the theory of evolution.

Edited by Lovedtodeath
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The neutrality might be neutral among the varying scientific viewpoints (not neutral among all viewpoints).

I would have no idea what they would be neutral on then. As far as I know, using the same reasoning if presenting the standard age of the earth, rocks, people, etc. and considering that neutral (though I originally said that didn't I?)... there is no "scientific" viewpoint that competes with the theory of evolution.

 

I am not in any way arguing. I am just trying to get some clarity... but maybe this should be a different thread? :o Laura did a good job starting it out in a very pointed way. Since I present evolution as one viewpoint (my kids have two parents) and not as fact, I shouldn't even be here (but I do want to use some of these resources).

Edited by Lovedtodeath
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Either way there seems to be a lot of fuss when in fact most elementary level science texts barely even touch the surface of that topic.
:iagree:

 

The problem is that most high school and college texts (well, unless your class is evolutionary biology. lol) barely even touch the surface of the topic. I was in honors classes and I didn't learn a thing about evolution until I purposely decided to research it myself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love how those look and will be watching with great interest. The price is pretty heavy, but if it comes with a CD for printing the needed sheets that is ok in my book. Science has always been hard for me to find something I like and although I love RSO, I don't know that it will keep pace for when I need new levels.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's why I've been sticking with RSO. :) I pretty much ditched BFSU when I heard he wouldn't cover evolution in his second book. Well, I guess I already gave up on it by then though.

 

We started teaching evolution mingled with history and science at age 4. It made so much sense. We also had fun learning about the Galapagos Islands and Charles Darwin. We have some cute YouTube videos out there. :)

 

This book might help on teaching evolution to older children. I haven't read it, but it looks very helpful.

NSTA Tool Kit for Teaching Evolution

Science, Evolution, and Creationism - helpful for those people who are uncomfortable with evolution, shows evolution can be fully compatible with religious faith

 

 

There's also some great websites out there. This should be a good start for folks.

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the resouces. I appreciate that you put them together.

 

So far I am having luck with the Usborne History books since the first section is based on evolution, but I am going to need something more in depth next year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know there's a Bill Nye on evolution :tongue_smilie:.

 

I am on the BFSU road & that doesn't really touch evolution, but we've already discussed it when we've discussed related science topics. I'm a theistic evolutionist, so we discuss both evolution & how God caused it when we discuss things like animal adaptations & anatomy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This could get hot...

 

I believe a curriculum is still neutral even when they talk about the age of the earth, rocks, people, universe, etc. (without giving full blown attention to evolution) because I don't consider the other viewpoints science. Please don't take this to mean I think they are absolute bunk or not worth considering. They just aren't science. They have not gone through the same considerations and measures as the scientific area of evolution/big bang, etc. The neutrality might be neutral among the varying scientific viewpoints (not neutral among all viewpoints).

 

That is my "theory". :D

 

I'm not sure I understand what you mean but from what I've seen, most people who don't "believe" in evolution, their reason is because they believe in a young earth. Those who accept the old age of the earth often go at least for theistic or God-directed evolution (of animals and plants at least, not always of humans).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My 5th grader really enjoyed the David Attenborough show "Charles Darwin and the Tree of Life" We also used "Darwin and Evolution for Kids". It was mostly about the life of Darwin with parts of the book dedicated to Evolution. The last book we used was "the Kingfisher book of Evolution."

 

My son is doing logic stage science so he did some reading in "Darwin and Evolution for kids" and the Kingfisher. I then had him write narrations or outlines of sections. It was a great way to start 5th grade biology. It comes up with almost every other topic we have studied.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure I understand what you mean but from what I've seen, most people who don't "believe" in evolution, their reason is because they believe in a young earth. Those who accept the old age of the earth often go at least for theistic or God-directed evolution (of animals and plants at least, not always of humans).

I have been looking into this a lot, trying to present all angles to my kids. There are Old Earth Creationists.... and what is funny is that Young Earth Creationists (for the most part) do believe that new species have come about from ancestors of different species... it would be hard to deny that.

 

 

I am finding this very interesting... it seems that Young Earth Creationists believe in "speedy" evolution.

 

I am not debating at all... just presenting what others believe, as I was surprised, as are many.

Edited by Lovedtodeath
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been looking into this a lot, trying to present all angles to my kids. There are Old Earth Creationists.... and what is funny is that Young Earth Creationists (for the most part) do believe that new species have come about from ancestors of different species... it would be hard to deny that.

 

 

 

I am finding this very interesting... it seems that Young Earth Creationists believe in "speedy" evolution.

 

I am not debating at all... just presenting what others believe, as I was surprised, as are many.

 

 

I was not aware of that view, thanks for the link. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm working on this with my daughter right now at a kindergarten level. I've been trying to come up with an idea or experiment to help her "get" the big bang theory. So far the only thing I've been able to think of is to get a water balloon and keep filling it until it explodes. Any other ideas?

 

We read "Older than the Stars" and "Our Family Tree" and those were both good if you are looking for cute children's books- fluffy, fun edutainment, KWIM?

 

http://www.amazon.com/Our-Family-Tree-Evolution-Story/dp/0152017720/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1297205924&sr=1-1

 

http://www.amazon.com/Older-Than-Stars-Karen-Fox/dp/1570917876/ref=sr_1_10?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1297205877&sr=1-10

 

Great idea to share info! There seems to be a lack of resources available for this subject so I'll be watching to see what everyone posts...

 

Thanks!!!

Hailey

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really hope this thread does not derail and get deleted.

 

I found this:

 

http://www.lessonplansinc.com/biology_lesson_plans_darwin_evolution.php

 

So far it looks like these might be free..... ?

It looks like it and from what I see this is very promising! It looks like some of these lesson plans might help students develop a true understanding of the theory. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Doesn't look like Netflix has that David Attenborough film.

 

It is rather new. It was made by the BBC to celebrate "Darwin Year". Attenbourough made it, despite very poor health, because he realized he had never compiled compelling information about the theory of evolution in one place. He didn't want there to be a question as to where he stands.

 

It is available via Amazon.

 

For a while, when we saw it, it was on google video via BBC for Darwin year.

 

You can see a short clip, among others, as a part of this video mashup.

 

Fun with autotune! :lol: It sounds like an episode of Glee!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is a very good lecture that Richard Dawkins did back in 1991. You can buy the DVD from the Richard Dawkins website, or watch it on YouTube. It is split into five 1 hour shows on YouTube. My ds watched these last year, he was 9, and he really enjoyed them. I thought I might have to split each episode to be watched over two days, but ds watched the whole hour with out even realizing that an hour had passed.

 

 

 

 

And just a fun little video, Evolution Made Us All, based in the hymn All Creatures Great and Small.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like Prentice Hall Science Explorer for middle school science. The labs in the books are mostly quite doable at home and the supplies are easy to find at http://www.homesciencetools.com .

 

I would do Oak Meadow's high school sciences in a different order. You really need to do Chemistry before Biology. The text they have set up for Chemistry is really best for 9th grade, but really no later than 10th grade unless you have a science-hater (or one who's scared of science). It would be best to do Biology right after you do Chemistry.

 

I won't go anywhere near Saxon and that's what they use for Physics. I am using Giancoli's for Physics, but it's an AP level text and really does need a knowledgeable teacher, so if you don't think you can handle that level, then you should use a different physics text.

 

I had originally planned to use Oak Meadow's Chemistry next year for my middle dd (will be in 11th grade), but after Giancoli's Physics, it's far too simplistic. It would have been fine if I'd used it for her in 9th grade. I'm mostly likely going to use Tro's Introductory Chemistry instead.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for all of the resources posted so far! I'm encouraged! :)

 

This probably won't help you now but for those of us with younger kids - the Level 2's of the RSO programs will mention evolution.

 

I know (and I'm so glad!), but they aren't out, yet. :( I'm pretty sure I'm going to use Real Science Odyssey with my younger ones this coming year. It helps that HomeScienceTools sells kits for RSO. I love kits. :)

 

That's why I've been sticking with RSO. :) I pretty much ditched BFSU when I heard he wouldn't cover evolution in his second book. Well, I guess I already gave up on it by then though.

 

I was so disappointed when I heard that even Vol. 3 won't mention evolution. I was leaning toward using it, but I don't want to have to supplement.

 

Great list of suggestions!

I can understand why so many curriculums want to remain neutral on evolution, what I don't understand is how they remain neutral. How do you teach astronomy (light years), geology (rock formation and strata), dinosaurs and fossils, genetics, etc. without at least touching on evolution or age of the earth issues?

 

That's my main reason for wanting a program that will eventually teach evolution. I feel like they are less likely to leave things out of all the other areas that evolution/AOE touches on.

 

:iagree: Exactly! Science is already neutral. If you "neutralize" science by expunging any references to the age of the earth or evolution, are you really left with a solidly scientific program? :confused: (Please, let's NOT turn this thread into a creationism vs. evolution debate. This is a support thread for those of us who have the very difficult task of finding homeschool-appropriate science resources based on mainstream scientific theory and teaching. :))

 

OM? Oak Meadow?

 

Yes, Oak Meadow. :)

 

I like the looks of these books as well (more from Saxon Homeschool):

http://saxonhomeschool.hmhco.com/en/products/default.htm?level2Code=M0010&level3Code=M31099&level4Code=M000128&level5Code=

 

And these:

http://saxonhomeschool.hmhco.com/en/products/default.htm?level2Code=M0010&level3Code=M31099&level4Code=M000130&level5Code=

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, I thought this Futurama episode was a hilarious way to explain the whole debate between evolutionists and creationists:

 

http://www.comedycentral.com/videos/index.jhtml?videoId=350306&title=evolution-under-attack

 

I would do Oak Meadow's high school sciences in a different order.

 

Thanks for the heads up. I would have done biology first, but will look at chemistry first instead, when we get there. I took calculus-based physics in college, but I'm rather rusty now. If I have a good textbook I can do it, I think.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like Prentice Hall Science Explorer for middle school science. The labs in the books are mostly quite doable at home and the supplies are easy to find at http://www.homesciencetools.com .

 

I would do Oak Meadow's high school sciences in a different order. You really need to do Chemistry before Biology. The text they have set up for Chemistry is really best for 9th grade, but really no later than 10th grade unless you have a science-hater (or one who's scared of science). It would be best to do Biology right after you do Chemistry.

 

I won't go anywhere near Saxon and that's what they use for Physics. I am using Giancoli's for Physics, but it's an AP level text and really does need a knowledgeable teacher, so if you don't think you can handle that level, then you should use a different physics text.

 

I had originally planned to use Oak Meadow's Chemistry next year for my middle dd (will be in 11th grade), but after Giancoli's Physics, it's far too simplistic. It would have been fine if I'd used it for her in 9th grade. I'm mostly likely going to use Tro's Introductory Chemistry instead.

 

Any specific reasons not to use Saxon for science? Have you seen the texts? I ask because they seem interesting but I have not seen the texts? I appreciate any info:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those packages are not actually "Saxon" textbooks, they are just Holt textbooks and the packages are just the textbook with all the trimmings. Honestly, I'm not impressed with the Holt books in middleschool, I like the PH better, but have used and liked them for high school especially with the OM syllabi.

 

Cost wise, you'd be better off just getting PH Science Explorer from Amazon- I picked up the student book, teachers book, and study guide for under $40.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any specific reasons not to use Saxon for science? Have you seen the texts? I ask because they seem interesting but I have not seen the texts? I appreciate any info:)

 

I don't think there's any specific reason. I read some reviews of the Holt books on Amazon that say the information is presented disjointedly and is sometimes not correct, but content/set up wise, I think they are much the same as any other text book.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was so disappointed when I heard that even Vol. 3 won't mention evolution. I was leaning toward using it, but I don't want to have to supplement.

 

Oh, no! :crying: I could understand him not including it in the early years, because it would be very difficult to approach it in a direct inquiry sort of way with those ages. But in the middle school years, you could. So it must have been a marketing decision. That is too bad. :mad:

 

 

 

Thanks to everyone who has provided links and resources in this thread!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those packages are not actually "Saxon" textbooks, they are just Holt textbooks and the packages are just the textbook with all the trimmings. Honestly, I'm not impressed with the Holt books in middleschool, I like the PH better, but have used and liked them for high school especially with the OM syllabi.

 

Cost wise, you'd be better off just getting PH Science Explorer from Amazon- I picked up the student book, teachers book, and study guide for under $40.

 

To clarify, it sounds like you like PH for middle school and have used Holt for highschool and like the same. Am I confused? I appreciate your input:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cost wise, you'd be better off just getting PH Science Explorer from Amazon- I picked up the student book, teachers book, and study guide for under $40.

 

Can you list titles or links for these? There seem to be many, many titles....

 

Here I am cruising along thinking that by the time I need it, it should be easy. Is this a problem when looking for high school materials as well?

 

If nothing else, there's OM syllabi to convert standard textbooks....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We looked at a number of books and Steve Jenkins, Life on Earth: The Story of Evolution has proven to be one of the most useful for my K'er.

 

Also, if you are anywhere even vaguely near NYC or are planning a trip, I cannot recommend enough the Spitzer Hall of Human Origins at the Museum of Natural History. It is a stunning exhibit. This book, which goes along with the exhibit but could also stand alone, I think, is also excellent:

 

http://www.amnhshop.com/books-posters-media/children-s-books/bones-brains-and-dna-the-human-genome-and-human-evolution.html

 

The museum website has some good resources, including some specifically for educators;

 

http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/permanent/humanorigins/

Edited by JennyD
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We looked at a number of books and Steve Jenkins, Life on Earth: The Story of Evolution has proven to be one of the most useful for my K'er.

 

Also, if you are anywhere even vaguely near NYC or are planning a trip, I cannot recommend enough the Spitzer Hall of Human Origins at the Museum of Natural History. It is a stunning exhibit. This book, which goes along with the exhibit but could also stand alone, I think, is also excellent:

 

http://www.amnhshop.com/books-posters-media/children-s-books/bones-brains-and-dna-the-human-genome-and-human-evolution.html

 

The museum website has some good resources, including some specifically for educators;

 

http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/permanent/humanorigins/

 

We live in the west, but we are planning an East Coast trip for next year. My mom is coming with us and I think she might be YEC. She is at least OEC. Not sure if she'd appreciate the exhibit, but it looks neat. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, these are pretty neat:

 

http://www.pearsonschool.com/index.cfm?locator=PSZe1j

 

The sample they have for Explorer is earth science. It has video clips and some little online activities. There are worksheets you can print out for various sections.

 

You can click on a button to hear a voice narrate the text. My dd10 hates reading text for school on a computer screen, but she loves being read to.

 

I think we are going to try one of these. If she likes it, we will get more titles.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know if this will help at all....our DS1 is 7.5. I have scoped out some books that are the "easy reading" version of some science textbooks for older grades. I am thinking I will get them and start them early with him, and he can use them until he progresses past needing easy reading. Anyway...the series is AGS. I don't know if anyone here has used them and can comment on them. However, I found a site that sells them that has previews, including the tables of contents. The TOC for the Biology book has a chapter on evolution:

 

http://www.wiesereducational.com/previews/MM7381/tb/pages/-Table-of-contents-p5_jpg.htm

 

There is a student text, workbook, and lab manual for the Biology book.

 

I have better books that cover evolution already...this looks like just a nutshell view....but if there is a need for a textbook that doesn't skip it, this might work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm working on this with my daughter right now at a kindergarten level. I've been trying to come up with an idea or experiment to help her "get" the big bang theory. So far the only thing I've been able to think of is to get a water balloon and keep filling it until it explodes. Any other ideas?

 

For little ones' date=' I like the presentation used in Montessori's "First Great Lesson". It involves the use of a balloon and gold stars to tell the story of the beginning of the universe. See this link for how to do it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You have several options with PH Science Explorer. You can get the topical bindups (Earth Science, Life Science, Physical Science), you can get the mixed-topic bindups (has topics from each strand in all three books), or you can get the individual texts.

 

One bindup or 5 individual texts will definitely take a full year to cover. We typically did 4 individual texts each year. My middle dd started the series in 5th grade, so she had time to do it that way and still cover all of the books.

 

The individual texts can be done in any order. In general, the earth science books are the easiest and the physical science books are the hardest.

 

--------------

 

I thought the Holt Biology book that Oak Meadow used for high school was fine, but it would have been better to have covered chemistry first because it starts off with biochemistry.

 

I won't use Saxon because I can't stand it. The Saxon methodology makes absolutely no sense to me.

 

I tried the Prentice Hall Biology book by Miller&Levine with my oldest and hated it. It was far too complicated and is used for Honors classes in my area.

 

I tried Hewitt's Conceptual Physics with my oldest, but it had so little math that my dd couldn't make any sense of the physics. She did much better when I switched her to Giancoli's Physics even though Giancoli's is typically used for AP.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, no! :crying: I could understand him not including it in the early years, because it would be very difficult to approach it in a direct inquiry sort of way with those ages. But in the middle school years, you could. So it must have been a marketing decision. That is too bad. :mad:

 

 

Here's what Dr. Nebel said about why he's not covering evolution (from the K5science group):

My aim is to have kids learn through through their own observations and rational thinking. I see the role of the teacher as guiding kids toward making the observations and keeping their thinking on a rational course. In short, this is what learning how to learn and the habits of mind for life-long learning are about.

 

Coming specifically to evolution, I do not mention it in the current volume of BFSU for K-2 nor do I address it in upcoming volumes for 3-5 or 6-8. You might say that this is sidestepping the issue, but I do not feel remiss in this. Evolution is a complex theory based on numerous lines of evidence, i.e., observations. Again, I focus on making the observations and rational thinking, and letting that take one where it will.

 

I hope at the very least, it leads to appreciation, awe, and wonderment as to how much is "out there" to explore, learn, and attempt to understand.

 

I have the sense that he does accept evolution. I also have the sense that he isn't an atheist, or at least he's not an atheist who is outwardly anti-religion. The only clue I've seen in my time (2 years?) on the K5science list is his response to this article, which was that it "does rather parallel my own thinking". He didn't say what about the article is parallel to his thinking, nor did he specify anything else.

 

Here's something else... the table of contents to the textbook on environmental science that he co-authored includes a chapter called "Ecosystems and Evolutionary Change" (see here). It might be interesting to track down a copy and see what he says.

 

FWIW...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We looked at a number of books and Steve Jenkins, Life on Earth: The Story of Evolution has proven to be one of the most useful for my K'er.

 

Also, if you are anywhere even vaguely near NYC or are planning a trip, I cannot recommend enough the Spitzer Hall of Human Origins at the Museum of Natural History. It is a stunning exhibit. This book, which goes along with the exhibit but could also stand alone, I think, is also excellent:

 

http://www.amnhshop.com/books-posters-media/children-s-books/bones-brains-and-dna-the-human-genome-and-human-evolution.html

 

The museum website has some good resources, including some specifically for educators;

 

http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/permanent/humanorigins/

 

:iagree: I've already bookmarked the museums website (as well as the Smithsonian) and once we start pre-history and lead into dinosaurs and then animals, I figure we'll be making weekly trips into NYC for the museum. Only about an hour by train.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...